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CATALOGUE 

OF 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTIETH YEAR 



May, 1918 




Andover, Massachusetts 
THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1918 



1918 1919 1919 1920 



S M T W T F S 



4 

10 11 
1 



24j25 26 27 
31 



AUGUST 



4 6 
11 12 

18 19 
25 26 



..I..I II 2! 8 
6 7 8 9jl0 
13 14 15|l6ll7 
20 21 22 28 24 
27 28129 30|31 



SEPTEMBER 



10 11 

17 18 
24i2J 



51 6 
12 13 
19120 
26127 



6 7 8 9 
1314 15 16 

20:21/22 23 
27 28 



31 41 5 
10 11 12 
17 18 19 

24|25l26 
29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 



8 4! 6 6 7 8 
10 11112113 14 15116 
171819 20 21 22 23 
24|25I26 27l28|29 30 



DECEMBER 



2 
9 

16 

22 23 
29 



31 4 
10 11 
17 18 

25 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 



FEBRUARY 



2 
9 
16 

23 24 



4 

10 11 
18 
25 



20 21 
27 



••I 1 
7 8 
14 16 



7 

13 14 

20 21 
27 



7 

13 14 
21 
28 



9 10 
16 17 



31 4 
10 11 

17 1 18 
24| 25 



S M T W T F S 



20 21 
27 



2 
9 
16 
28 
29 80 













1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


81 















SEPTEMBER 



81 4 
lOjll 
17118 
24 25 



5' 
12 1 
19; 20 
26 27 



6 6 

12 18 
19 20 
26 27 



II 2| 3 
8l 9 10 
15l6|17 
22 23 24 
29 30; 31 



NOVEMBER 



2 8 

9110 
1617 
23; 24 

301.. 



4 5 6 7 8 

11 12 13 1 14 15 

18 19 20|21 22 
25126 27J28 29 



DECEMBER 



' 1 2 3 
7| 8! 910 
1416116 17 
21:22 23!24 25 
28129 30 31 



s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



5 6 

12 13 
19 20 
26 27 



11 2 
8 9 
15 16 

22 23 
29:30 



10 
17 

24 25 



20 21 
27 28 



3I 4 51 6 7 
lOlll 12;1314 
17 18 19120 21 
24 25 26|27 28 



JUNE 



2 3 
9110 
1617 



4 5 
11 12 
18 19 



January 3 
March 28 
April 10 
June 13 

June llf, 

June 18 and 19 



June 22 

J >ne 17 to 22 



September 10 

September 11 

September 12 

November 28 
December 19 



January 6 
March 21 
April 1 
June 12 

June 13 

June 17 and 18 



June 21 



CALENDAR 

1918 



Thursday, 8.30 p.m. 
Thursday noon 
Wednesday, 8.30 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 

Tuesday and Wednesday 
Saturday 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for two lower 
classes 

Commencement 

Entrance examinations in An- 
dover, New York City, Chi- 
cago, and other cities 

Third term ends for two upper 
classes 

College Entrance Board exam- 
inations 



Tuesday, 9.00 a. m. 
Wednesday, 745 a.m. 
Thursday, 745 a.m. 



Thursday 
Thursday noon 



1919 



Monday, 845 p.m. 
Friday noon 
Tuesday, 845 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 

Tuesday and Wednesday 



Saturday 



Chapel, followed by entrance 

examinations 
Exercises begin for two lower 

classes 

Exercises begin for two upper 

classes 
Thanksgiving recess 
First term ends 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for two lower 
classes 

Commencement 

Entrance examinations in An- 
dover, New York City, Chi- 
cago, and other cities 

Third term ends for two upper 
classes 



3 



FOUNDERS 



Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS Hon. JOHN PHILLIPS, LL.D. 

Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS, Jr. 



Constitution and Deeds of Trust signed 
Board of Trustees organized, 
School opened for instruction, 
Act of Incorporation passed, 
Theological Seminary opened, 
Scientific Department opened, 
Archaeological Department opened, 
Theological Seminary incorporated, 
Theological Seminary real estate purchased, 



April 21, 1778 
April 28, 1778 
April 30, 1778 
October 4, 1780 
September 28, 1308 
September 2v, 1830 
May 1, 1901 
April 16, 1907 
July 1, 1908 



PRINCIPALS 



ELIPHALET PEARSON, LL.D. 1778 — 1786 

EBENEZER PEMBERTON, LL.D. 1786 — 1793 

MARK NEWMAN, A.M. 1795 — 1810 

JOHN ADAMS, LL.D. 1810 — 1833 

OSGOOD JOHNSON, A.M. 1833 — 1837 

SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, LL.D. 1838 — 1871 

FREDERIC W. TILTON, A.M. 1871 — 1873 

CECIL F. P. BANCROFT, Ph.D., LL.D. 1873 — 1901 

ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 1903 — 



4 



TRUSTEES 



ALFRED LAWRENCE RIPLEY, A.M. 
Elected 1902 

CLERK 

ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, Litt. D., L.H.D 
Elected 1903 

TREASURER 

JAMES COWAN SAWYER, A.B. 
Elected 1900 



GEORGE BROWN KNAPP, A.M. 
Elected 1899 

JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D. 
Elected 1899 

CLARENCE MORGAN, A.B. 
Elected 1900 

CLIFFORD HERSCHELL MOORE, Litt.D. 
Elected 1902 

Hon. HENRY LEWIS STIMSON, A.M. 
Elected 1905 

ELIAS BULLARD BISHOP, A.B. 
Elected 1907 

Hon. JOHN ADAMS AIKEN, LL.D. 
Elected 1908 

FRED TOWSLEY MURPHY, M.D. 
Elected 1908 

JOSEPH PARSONS 
Elected 1910 

FREDERICK GOODRICH CRANE 
Elected 1912 



Andover 
Andover 
Andover 

Boston 
Cambridge 
Shelburne, Yt. 
Cambridge 
New York City 
Newton Centre 
Greenfield 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Lakeville, Conn. 

D ALTON 



5 



FACULTY 



ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, A.M., Litt.D., L.H.D., Principal 

On the Peter Smith Byers Memorial Foundation 6 Chapel Avenue 

Instructor 1897—1903. Elected Principal 1903 



MATTHEW SCOBY McCURDY, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
GEORGE THOMAS EATON, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
CHARLES EMERSON STONE, Ph.B. 

Instructor in French 
CHARLES HENRY FORBES, A.M. 

Professor of Latin on the John C. Phillips Foundation 
ARCHIBALD FREEMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in History 
ALLEN ROGERS BENNER, A.B. 

Professor of Greek 
JAMES CHANDLER GRAHAM, S.B. 

Peabody Instructor in Natural Sciences 
BERNARD MELZAR ALLEN, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
FREDERICK EDWIN NEWTON, Ph.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
CHARLES PEABODY, Ph.D. 

Director of the Department of American 
Archaeology 
WARREN KING MOOREHEAD, A.M. 

Instructor in Archaeology and Curator of 
the Museum of American Archaeology 
LESTER EDWARD LYNDE, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
HORACE MARTIN POYNTER, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
PEIRSON STERLING PAGE, M.D. 

Physical Director and Medical Visitor 
GEORGE WALKER HINMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in Latin 
CECIL KITTREDGE BANCROFT, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin, Principal's Assistant 
and Registrar 



60 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1873 
73 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1880 
158 Main Street 
Appointed 1890 
25 Hidden Road 
Elected 1891 
Phillips 16 
Appointed 1892 
Andover 7 
Elected 1892 
Phillips 5 
Appointed 1892 
56 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1893 
Williams Hall 
Appointed 1894 
9 Salem Street 
Appointed 1895 
197 Brattle Street, Cambridge 
Elected 1901 

Hidden Field 
Elected 1901 

195 Main Street 
Appointed 1901 
21 Phillips Street 
Appointed 1902 
193 Main Street 
Appointed 1902 
169 Main Street 
Appointed 1906 
Bartlet 5 
Appointed 1906 



6 



CHARLES ARTHUR PARMELEE, A.M. 

Instructor in French 
ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
♦MARKHAM WINSLOW STACKPOLE, S.T.B. 

School Minister 
GEORGE FRANKLIN FRENCH, A.M. 

Instructor in German 
CLAUDE MOORE FUESS, Ph.D. 

Instructor in English 
FREDERICK MAY BOYCE, A.M. 

Instructor in Physics 
GIJY HEBARD EATON, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
OSWALD TOWER, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
FRANK O'BRIEN, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
CARL FRIEDRICH PFATTEICHER, A.M. 

Instructor in Music and Bible 
FREDERIC WILLIAM HEATON STOTT, A.B. 

Instructor in English and Public Speaking 
SAMUEL NEWHALL BAKER, A.M. 

Instructor in French and Spanish 
VAUGHN SEAVY BLANCHARD, A.B. 

Instructor in German and Assistant 
Physical Director 
SHARON OSBORNE BROWN, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
EDWIN TENNEY BREWSTER, A.M. 

Instructor in General Science 
HOWARD WADSWORTH CHURCH, Ph.D. 

Instructor in German 
DUMONT CLARKE, A.B. 

Religious Secretary and Instructor in Bible 
ARTHUR BURR DARLING, A.B. 

Instructor in History and Englisk 
ROY EVERETT SPENCER, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
ROY SNOW HAGGARD, S.B. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing and 
Assistant in Chemistry 



Bartlet 22 
Appointed 1906 
79 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1907 
189 Main Street 
Appointed 1907 
12 School Street 
Appointed 1907 
183 Main Street 
Appointed 1908 

Taylor Hall 
Appointed 1909 
Bancroft 8 
Appointed 1909 

Adams Hall 
Appointed 1910 

Adams Hall 
Appointed 1910 
Eaton 7 
Appointed 1912 

Taylor Hall 
Appointed 1912 
Day 7 
Appointed 1914 
34 Salem Street 
Appointed 1915 

32 Phillips Street 
Appointed 1916 
8 Judson Road 
Appointed 1916 
Bishop 30 
Appointed 1917 
215 Main Street 
Appointed 1917 
Bishop 7 
Appointed 1917 
Pemberton 4 
Appointed 1917 
Day 30 
Appointed 1917 



* Absent in service of the United States. 



7 



GUY JOHNSON FORBUSH, A.B. Draper 4 

Instructor in French Appointed 1917 

HARRY UPSON CAMP Williams Hall 

Instructor in Mathematics and Assistant in Physics Appointed 1917 

MAJOR ROBERT N. DAVY Bancroft 1 

Instructor in Military Science and Tactics Appainted 1917 



SARAH LOW FROST 

Librarian 

♦FREDERICK JOSEPH DALY, A.B. 

Private Secretary to the Principal 



OTHER OFFICERS 

VIRGIL D. HARRINGTON, A.B. 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 
HENRY S. HOPPER 

Bursar 
FRANK L. QUINBY 

Secretary of the Bureau of Self -Help 
HARRIET L. ERVING 

Cashier 
MABEL L. JONES 

Secretary to the Principal 
ALICE T. WHITNEY 

Recorder 
MONTVILLE E. PECK 

Assistant to the Physical Director 
MAIDIE L. ERVING 

Assistant in the Treasurer s Office 
ETHEL A. HITCHCOCK 

Assistant in the Superintendent's Office 
ETHEL M. EATON 

Assistant Secretary to the Principal 
MARIE DAVANEY 

Matron at the Isham Infirmary 
MRS. MABEL F. PARKS 

Matron at Williams Hall 
CLEMENTINE M. KELLOGG 

Assistant in the Treasurer's Office 

♦Absent in service of the United States. 



201 Main Street 
Appointed 1912 



I 

18 Chapel Avenue 
69 Salem Street 
Hidden Road 
43 Salem Street 
49 Whittier Street 
61 Bartlet Street 
Williams Hall 
59 Salem Street 
High Street 
67 Bartlet Street 
Isham Infirmary 
Williams Hall 
107 Main Street 



8 



ACADEMY PREACHERS, 


1917-1918 


Professor WILLIAM R. ARNOLD, Ph.D. 


Cambridge 


President CLARENCE A. BARBOUR, D.D. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Rev. EDWARD C. BOYNTON 


Worcester 


Rev. ARTHUR H. BRADFORD, D.D. 


Rutland, Vt. 


Dean CHARLES R. BROWN, D.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Principal HUBER G. BUEHLER, A.M., Litt.D. 


Lakeville, Conn. 


Rev. WILLIS H. BUTLER 


Boston 


Rev. WILLIAM R. CAMPBELL, D.D. 


Boston 


Rev. EDWARD M. CHAPMAN 


New London, Conn. 


Rev. VAUGHAN DABNEY 


Durham, N. H. 


Rev. D. BREWER EDDY 


Boston 


President W. H. P. FAUNCE, D.D., LL.D. 


Providence, R. I. 


Rev. JOHN C. FERGUSON, D.D. 


Newton 


Bishop EDWIN H. HUGHES, D.D. 


Maiden 


Rev. ALFRED RODMAN HUSSEY 


Lowell 


Rt. Rev. WILLIAM LAWRENCE, D.D. 


Boston 


Rev. ASHLEY D. LEAVITT 


Portland, Me. 


President JAMES G. K. McCLURE, D.D. 


Chicago, HI. 


Rev. CHARLES S. MILLS, D.D. 


Montclair, N. J. 


Rev. ARTHUR W. MOULTON 


Lawrence 


President LEMUEL H. MURLIN, LL.D. 


Boston 


Dr. GEORGE A. PARKIN 


Eogland 


Rev. WILLIAM W. PATTON 


Haverhill 


Principal LEWIS PERRY, Litt.D. 


Exeter, N. H. 


Professor WILLIAM LYON PHELPS, Ph.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Rev. J. WINTHROP PLATNER, D.D. 


Cambridge 


DAVID R. PORTER 


New York, N. Y. 


Very Rev. EDMUND S. ROUSMANIERE, D.D. 


Boston 


Rev. HENRY P. SCHAUFFLER, D.D. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


ROBERT E. SPEER, D.D. 


New York, N. Y. 


OLIVER 0. STANCHFLELD 


Bangalore, India 


Principal ALFRED E. STEARNS. Litt.D., L.H.D. Andover 


President J. ROSS STEVENSON, D.D. 


Princeton, N. J. 


President JOHN M. THOMAS, D.D. 


Middlebury, Vt. 


Prof. HENRY HALLAM TWEEDY 


New Haven, Conn. 


Colonel CECIL G. WILLIAMS 


Toronto, Canada 



9 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is not a private school, but an endowed 
academy, controlled by a Board of Trustees and administered 
under the written constitution of its founders. By the terms 
of this Constitution, or Deed of Gift, signed April 21, 1778, 
Esquire Samuel Phillips (1715-1790) of North Andover and his 
brother, John Phillips (1719-1795) of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
set aside tracts of about 141 acres on Andover Hill and 200 acres 
in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, together with the sum of 1614 
pounds, as a foundation for a school. This document, outlining 
the broad principles upon which the proposed institution was to 
be conducted, was composed by Esquire Phillips's son, Samuel 
Phillips, Jr. (1752-1802), with the advice and aid of his friend, 
Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826). Samuel Phillips, Jr. was after- 
wards Judge of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, 
President of the Senate, and Lieutenant-Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Although Judge Phillips derived many of his educational 
theories from the writings of John Locke and from the English 
nonconformist schools with the scheme of which he was f amiliar, 
his plan was nevertheless highly original. The purpose of the 
academy was specifically stated in the following words : — 

"And, in order to prevent the smallest subversion of the true intent of this 
Foundation, it is again declared, that the first and principal object of this 
Institution is the promotion of true Piety and Virtue; the second, instruction 
in English, Latin, and Greek languages, together with Writing, Arithmetic, 
Music, and the Art of Speaking; the third, practical Geometry, Logic, and 
Geography; and the fourth, such other of the liberal Arts and Sciences, or 
Languages, as opportunity and ability may hereafter admit, and as the Trustees 
shall direct. " 

10 



The chief emphasis was laid on the development of character, 
and the Master was to take pains "to regulate the tempers, to 
enlarge the minds, and form the Morals of the Youth com- 
mitted to his care". It was stipulated, also, that the school 
"shall be ever equally open to youth, of requisite qualifications, 
from every quarter ". The government was placed in the hands 
of a self -perpetuating Board of Trustees. In order to prevent 
sectarianism and provincialism, it was specified that a majority 
of the members should be laymen, and that more than half 
must not be residents of the town in which the academy is 
located. The Trustees were hampered by no vexatious or 
trivial restrictions, but were given sole authority over the institu- 
tion. By the provisions of the Act of Incorporation, passed by 
the General Court, October 4, 1780, their number was fixed at 
never more than thirteen or less than seven, and they were 
permitted to possess real estate with an income not exceeding 
five hundred pounds and personal property with an income not 
greater than two thousand pounds. These holding powers have 
since been considerably enlarged by legislative enactments, as 
the school has grown. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Tuesday, April 28, 1778. Of the twelve original members, four 
were members of the Phillips family: Esquire Samuel Phillips, 
John Phillips, William Phillips of Boston, and Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. These men became in turn the first four presidents of the 
Board. The other members, all relatives or close friends of the 
Phillips family, were John Lowell and Oliver Wendell of Boston, 
Rev. Josiah Stearns of Epping, Rev. Elias Smith of Middleton, 
Rev. William Symmes of North Andover, and Rev, Jonathan 
French, Nehemiah Abbot, Esq., and Eliphalet Pearson of 
Andover. 

Phillips School, as it was called until its incorporation, was 
opened for instruction April 30, 1778, in a remodeled carpenter's 
shop on Andover Hill, thirteen pupils being present; before the 
year was over, fifty -two had registered. The first principal was 

11 



Eliphalet Pearson, a stimulating teacher and Jstern^discipli- 
narian, who established high standards of instruction and 
supervision. Shortly before he resigned in 1786 to become a 
professor at Harvard, a new wooden building was erected to 
meet the demands of the rapidly expanding school. Pearson 
was succeeded by Ebenezer Pemberton, a polite and scholarly 
master, who devoted much attention to the manners of his 
pupils. When he left in 1793, he was followed in office by Mark 
Newman, in whose administration the Andover Theological 
Seminary was founded, largely through the efforts of Dr. 
Pearson. This seminary, which was opened September 28, 
1808, was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees 
of Phillips Academy, and remained in Andover almost exactly 
a century. 

The fourth principal, John Adams, who replaced Newman in 
1810, raised the prestige of the school, increased the attendance, 
and enlarged the faculty. He published the first catalogue and 
made the first revision of the curriculum ; but his primary interest 
was in the moral welfare of the boys. The second Academy 
building was burned on January 28, 1818, and a new brick, 
colonial edifice, designed by the famous architect Bulfinch, was 
erected within a year; this "classic hall", described in Oliver 
Wendell Holmes 's poem, The School Boy, is now in use as the 
Dining Hall. In 1830 the Teachers' Seminary, a new institu- 
tion made possible by a bequest of His Honor, William Phillips 
(1750-1827) of Boston, was opened in a massive square structure, 
commonly known as the Stone Academy, built for that purpose. 
This Teachers' Seminary, combining the aims of a normal 
school and a scientific school, was the second of its kind in the 
United States. After twelve years of existence with only 
moderate success it was finally, in 1842, merged with Phillips 
Academy as the "English Department", a name which was 
changed in 1892 to a more nearly accurate title, "Scientific 
Department". 

12 



In 1832 John Adams resigned at the age of sixty, and Osgood 
Johnson was elected principal. Unfortunately he died inl837, 
of consumption, in his thirty-fifth year. During his adminis- 
tration the " Commons", dormitories known to so many gene- 
rations of Phillips boys, were built under the direction of 
Samuel Farrar, Esq., Treasurer of the Trustees. 

Samuel H. Taylor, whose reign of thirty-four years was the 
longest in the school history, became principal in 1837. The 
word "reign" is used advisedly, for he was an autocrat, severe 
in his methods of government and prompt to punish offenders. 
"Uncle Sam", as he was familiarly called, was a relentless 
drill-master in the classics and gained a well-deserved repu- 
tation for thoroughness and accuracy. He was a strong and 
vigorous personality, who made an enduring impression on all 
who came under his influence. In 1864 the Stone Academy 
was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by the present Main 
Building, which has since been twice reconstructed. In 1865 
Mr. George Peabody gave $25,000 to found the Peabody 
Instructorship in Natural Sciences, first filled by the late 
William B. Graves. Dr. Taylor, on January 29, 1871, dropped 
dead in the vestibule of the Main Building. For the next 
two years the office of principal was held by Frederic W. Tilton, 
who, however, could do little in that short period. 

The modern era of development began in 1873 with the 
arrival of Cecil F. P. Bancroft, who was principal until his 
death in 1901. Dr. Bancroft, working in a quiet, tactful, but 
persistent way, brought about many needed reforms. He 
first made a complete revision of the curriculum, thus enabling 
the school to meet the entrance requirements of any college, 
classical or scientific, and greatly broadening the range of 
studies. In his effort to gather about himself a larger and 
more efficient body of teachers he was entirely successful. The 
attendance also increased: in 1873 there were 252 pupils; in 
1895 this had grown to 524, and after 1892 it never again 
dropped below 400. Dr. Bancroft also strove to secure additions 

13 



to the plant, especially by providing dormitories in which boys 
could live under the direct supervision of instructors. He was 
aided in this aim by Melville C. Day of the class of 1858, who, 
in 1892, gave $8000 for a new dormitory, Taylor Cottage (now 
Pemberton Cottage), which was the beginning of the present 
extensive system of houses for students. Mr. Day continued 
his gifts, providing in all six dormitories which to-day furnish 
rooms for 168 boys, besides the teachers in charge. At his 
death in 1913 Mr. Day made Phillips Academy his residuary 
legatee. His gifts to the school amount in all to over $800,000. 

On June 5 and 6, 1878, Phillips Academy celebrated its 
centennial anniversary with elaborate exercises, including an 
historical paper by Rev. William E. Park, an oration by Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and 
speeches by Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Gustavus V. Fox, 
and other distinguished men associated with the school. At 
this time a fund of $100,000 was raised, partly for the en- 
dowment of a principalship and a professorship in Latin. 

Dr. Bancroft's period was marked by both progress and 
expansion. He was a man of clear vision and foresight, firm 
will, and shrewd discrimination, who had the good sense to be 
patient until circumstances were favorable for pressing his 
projects. His policy has been maintained by his successor, 
Alfred E. Stearns, during whose administration Phillips 
Academy has grown in material equipment, in numbers, and in 
efficiency. In 1908, when Andover Theological Seminary was 
moved to Cambridge, the Trustees acquired the entire Seminary 
plant on Andover Hill at a cost of $200,000, thus more than 
doubling its property in land and buildings. In 1901 two 
generous benefactors of the school, Mr. R. Singleton Peabody 
of the class of 1857, and his wife, Margaret Peabody, estab- 
lished the Archaeological Department providing for it a large 
endowment for instruction, publication, and research, and for 
the care and housing of collections in American Archaeology. 

14 



The official installation of Principal Stearns into office happily 
coincided with the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the 
founding of the school, held on June 16, 1903. The guest of 
honor was His Excellency, Sir Chentung Liang Cheng, Minister 
Plenipotentiary from the Chinese Empire to the United States, 
who was a student at Phillips Academy in 1880 and 1881. At 
the exercises in the new Borden Gymnasium the speakers were 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie, Hon. Robert R. Bishop, Sir Chentung 
Liang Cheng, and Mr. Stearns. On the same day Brothers' 
Field was dedicated with an address from the principal donor, 
Mr. George B. Knapp. 

The Bulletin, a magazine devoted to the interests and history 
of the school and its alumni, is published four times a year and 
sent to all former members of Phillips Academy whose addresses 
are known. 



15 



THE ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is national in its representation and demo- 
cratic in its life and spirit, and is "equally open to youth of 
requisite qualifications from every quarter". It aims to attract 
students of serious educational purposes and high moral 
standards. 

The Academy is not a suitable school for boys who are idle, 
insubordinate, or lacking in self-control; nor is it adapted for 
those who require the constant supervision of teachers in the 
preparation of school work. Students who are found to be un- 
able or unwilling to meet the requirements, and those whose 
influence is injurious, must be withdrawn from the school. As 
maturity is not always to be measured by years, the school has 
no specific regulation as to the age of the candidate. In general, 
however, it has been found that boys of fourteen are able to meet 
the responsibilities of life in the Academy. 

The school provides accommodations and surroundings for its 
students which enable them to pass by gradual and natural 
stages from the paternalism of home life to the freedom that 
awaits them in college. Williams Hall, with its close supervision, 
special hours, and home life, offers attractive and helpful 
surroundings to the young boy just leaving home for his school 
career. A natural and progressive development is provided for 
subsequent years in the houses and halls which are in charge of 
married instructors. The regulations which obtain in all 
dormitories are here in force, but there is in them the atmos- 
phere of home. The later life of the dormitories is designed to 
develop a larger sense of responsibility and to prepare for the 
community life of college. Boys in the dormitories are under 
the supervision of instructors and are required to observe fully 
the regulations of the school. In the judgment of the school 

16 



authorities the average boy will secure the best results intel- 
lectually and morally by following out this gradual change in 
residence. 

LOCATION 

Andover is a town of eight thousand inhabitants, situated 
on the Portland Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
twenty-three miles north of Boston. For convenience the fol- 
lowing addresses are given: Miss Bertha Bailey, Principal of 
the Abbot Academy for girls; Chester W. Holland, Cashier 
of the Andover National Bank; Edward L. Perley, Station 
Agent, Boston and Maine Railroad; John M. Stewart, mana- 
ger of the Phillips Inn; Hon. John N. Cole, the Andover Press 
and the Andover Bookstore. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

„ , . . 7 Candidates for admission to the Academv are 
L estimomals . , , ,. . , „ . , 

required to present testimonials 01 good moral 

character and certificates of standing in the schools formerly 

attended, and no application for admission can be accepted 

definitely until satisfactory letters have been received. These 

testimonials and certificates must be presented not later than 

the date of the entrance examinations, and should be forwarded 

earlier if possible to the Principal of the Academy. 

Entrance Examinations are required for entrance to the 

Requirements three lower classes. Although scholarship 

Three Lower records of other schools are not accepted for 

Classes admission to the several classes of the Academy, 

they are of service to the school officers in 

determining the classification of applicants. 

In filing application for admission the blank inserted in the 

back of this catalogue should be used. As the information called 

for on this blank is of importance to the school authorities, it 

should be given with the utmost attention to detail. 

17 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Junior Class: 

Arithmetic; English, grammar and composition; Geogra- 
phy: these subjects as ordinarily taught in grammar schools. 

Lower Middle Class: 

Arithmetic; Algebra, work of Junior year as given on page 
48; the work in English prescribed for the Junior year on 
page 46 ; either French, the work of Junior year as given on 
page 43, or German, the work of Junior year as given on 
page 44; Latin, grammar and exercises; Caesar, Gallic War, 
Book II. 

Upper Middle Class: 

Algebra, work of Junior and Lower Middle year as given on 
page 48; Plane Geometry, work of Lower Middle year as 
described on page 49; the work in English prescribed for 
the Lower Middle year on pages 46-47; Latin, grammar and 
exercises; Caesar, Gallic War, four books; Nepos, ten lives; 
two years' work (four hours a week) in French or German, 
and one years' work in either Greek or the second modern 
language. Candidates for the Scientific department may 
substitute for the second modern language a school certi- 
ficate in any accredited college examination subject in which 
at least four recitations a week have been held. 

Specimen examination papers will be supplied upon 
request. 

Entrance ^° examma ^ ons are gi yen by the Academy 

„ . , for admission to the Senior class. Applicants 

thBOUl TBlll CTltS 

. ~, ' may secure provisional credit for courses pur- 
Senior Class , . , , , . 

sued m other schools by presenting a certm- 

cate or formal statement from the college of their choice, 
showing with what subjects the college has credited them 
towards admission. Such certificates may be obtained either 
by passing entrance examinations set by the college, or by 
presenting to the college the returns secured from the ex- 
aminations of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

18 



Credits may also be secured from colleges which admit on the 
certificate plan, by having the required statement filled out 
by the principal and sent to the college. In the case of those 
who plan to enter college by the Comprehensive Examinations, 
after one year in the Academy, a formal approval of their 
previous courses by the college they plan to enter will be 
accepted for corresponding courses in the Academy. Candidates 
for admission to the Senior class should indicate in their pre- 
liminary correspondence the subjects credited to them in their 
college examinations. Seniors arrange their schedules on the 
basis of the college certificates which they hold, those studies 
being selected which best complete the student's preparation 
for his college or scientific school. The lists of Senior subjects 
given on pages 40 and 41 exhibit the range of this selection. 
Students are not admitted to the Senior class later than the 
beginning of the winter term. 

. , Candidates for the diploma of the Academy 

n , . should note carefully the following statements 
Requirements . _ • . , 

relative to benior standing: 

1. College preliminary certificates are accepted as equivalents 
for the Phillips Academy courses which they represent. 

2. If the certificate covers all the courses up to the Senior 
year, the holder is admitted to full entrance to the Senior class, 
and is a diploma candidate. 

3. If the certificate covers all but eight hours a week of the 
courses up to the Senior year, the holder is admitted to the 
Senior class, but may or may not be a diploma candidate. 

4. If the certificate represents nine or more hours less than the 
courses up to the Senior year, the holder can not enter the 
Senior class. 

Entrance Candidates for admission to the Junior, Lower 

Examinations -^^dle, an( ^ Upper Middle classes will be 
examined on Tuesday and Wednesday, June 18 
and 19, 1918. Candidates must register between 9.00 a.m. and 
9.30 a.m. at one of the following places: 

19 



Andover: Phillips Academy, Graves Hall. 

Chicago: Hurd Hall, Northwestern University 

M v lr Building, corner Lake and Dearborn Sts. 

JNew York: y.M.C.A. Building, 215 West 23d St. 

Examinations will be held in other large cities, in June 
only, if the number of candidates in any vicinity is sufficient. 

On Tuesday, September 10, 1918, examinations will be held 
at 9.30 a.m., in Andover only, according to a schedule of rooms 
and hours announced at that time. 

For examinations held in Andover on these regular dates no 
fees are charged. For examinations held outside of Andover, 
and for special entrance examinations held at other times than 
those here given, a fee of $5.00 is required. 

Candidates intending to present themselves at these examina- 
tions should give early notice to the Registrar of the Academy, 
and are strongly urged to take the examinations in June while 
the subjects are still fresh in their minds. 

Where a prospective student's preparation does not exactly 
correspond with the school curriculum, he may take the ex- 
aminations of a higher, or lower, class than the one he plans to 
enter, in any subject for which he is prepared. 

The subjects upon which entrance examinations will be given 
in June and September are as follows : 

Junior Class Upper Middle Class 

Arithmetic Algebra 
English English 
Geography Latin Grammar and 

Lower Middle Class Composition 

Arithmetic and Algebra Caesar and Nepos 

English French 
French Geometry 
German German 
Latin Grammar and Caesar Greek 



For admission requirements see page 18. 

20 



CLASSIFICATION 

. . , Candidates must be enrolled in one of the regu- 
Assignment , , ~ . 

to Classes classes. Owing to differences in prepara- 

tion it often happens that a student 's work lies 
mainly in two classes. In determining his classification in such 
instances a net aggregate of nine hours in the lower class neces- 
sitates enrolment with that class. Furthermore, whenever a 
student for any cause falls behind his class in a net aggregate 
of nine hours he must be registered with the lower class. 
~ . , No special students, except foreigners, are re- 

c ,, 1 , ceived in the Junior or Lower Middle year, and 

students Al . , , . . „ . , 

the Academy makes no provision tor special 

students who are not candidates for graduation, or for entrance 

to college, scientific school, or professional school. 

Special courses may be arranged in the Upper Middle and 
Senior years, only at the written request of parents and by 
special Faculty vote. Such courses, without Latin, do not 
entitle the student to a diploma. 

At least the first and second years of Latin are required for 
the Scientific diploma. 

t, . J . Written examinations are held in each study at 
Examinations , , . ., . . , , 

least once a term, but the term grading is based 

Promotions ° n ^ e resu ^ s °f both written examinations and 
daily work. A student who is guilty of dis- 
honesty in an examination may be suspended or dismissed. At 
the close of each term, a report of the student's scholarship 
and attitude towards his work is sent to his parents or guardian. 
Mid-term reports are also sent for all students whose work is 
below the passing grade, 60 per cent, and for those who obtain 
grades of 80% and above. 

Class Each student is assigned to the special care of 

Officers a mem ^ er °^ tne faculty who is known as his 

Class Officer. This officer arranges the sched- 
ule of studies for each member of the class under his charge, 
and recommends such subsequent changes as seem desirable. 

21 



Division 
Officers 



The entire school is divided into groups of 
approximately twenty students each. Each 
group is assigned to the special charge of an 
instructor whose duty it is to familiarize himself with the 
previous history and present standing of the several members 
and to serve as their counselor. 

APPOINTMENTS 

7.45 a.m. Morning chapel. 

8.07 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. [Recitation 

Daily 4.07 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. (and study hours. 

Appointments 8.00 p.m. Evening study hours begin. 

10.30 a.m. and 5.15 p.m. Sunday chapel services. 
Half-holidays, Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noons. 

Students are expected to occupy themselves 
with their studies or other school work during 



Study Hours 
all study hours. 

Absences 



Every absence of the student from recitation, 
morning chapel, Sunday service, or from his 
room during study hours, must be accounted for. The accumu- 
lation of eight unexcused absences involves suspension from 
school. In all cases of illness, notice must be sent at once to the 
Medical Visitor, who investigates daily all cases reported. 

Special importance is attached to meeting all appointments 
immediately preceding and following vacation and recess periods. 
A failure to meet such appointments must be regarded as a very 
serious offence and may necessitate withdrawal from school. 

All out-of-town excuses must be obtained from 
the Principal. On half -holidays and on spe- 
cial holidays such excuses are granted occa- 
sionally to those whose school standing is good. The student 
who goes out of town without permission forfeits his connection 
with the school. 

22 



Out-of-town 
Excuses 



t> i> • Students are required to be present at morning 

^ . chapel. The Sundav services in the Chapel 

LjX6TCXS6S 

and the religious work of the school are in 
charge of the School Minister, who is also the pastor of the 
Academy Church, an undenominational organization. Dis- 
tinguished clergymen are frequently invited to preach to the 
school. The Society of Inquiry holds a voluntary meeting on 
Sunday evening, usually addressed by some invited speaker. 

Upon written request from their parents, students may be 
excused to attend the morning services of the Protestant Epis- 
copal, Baptist, or Roman Catholic churches. 

EXPENSES 

Parents can estimate approximately the expenses of their sons 
at the Academy, and they are particularly requested not to 
furnish money beyond what is necessary for modest expendi- 
tures. Pupils who are supplied with much spending money, 
or who are allowed to incur debts, often accomplish little in 
their studies, and are liable to form habits which require their 
withdrawal from the school. Parents are earnestly requested 
to refuse permission to their sons to contract debts. The 
schedules of the items named below indicate the ordinary cost 
for limited, average, and ample expenditure. 

*Economical Moderate Liberal 

Tuition, $200.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Room, light, and heat, 40 . 00 175 . 00 200 . 00 

Board, 210.00 210.00 297.50 

Athletic charge, 9.00 15.00 15.00 



$459.00 $600.00 $712.50 

*Scholarship boys by earnest endeavor may meet these charges in part or 
in whole. 

m ... r .. 77 The tuition for the year is $200.00 divided as 
Ivihon Bills e „ , nP , ,r,™™ ti ^ 

tollows: tnree-nltns, or $120.00, payable Oct- 
ober 1; two-fifths, or 80.00, payable on March 1. Each student 



is 



is required to deposit with the Treasurer on entering the school 
the sum of $10.00 to cover breakage and other obligations which 
may be incurred during the school year. The balance remaining 
after such charges have been deducted will be returned. 

An additional charge of $8.00 is made to the final bills of 
members of the Senior class to cover the expenses of Commence- 
ment. A rebate of $1.50 from this charge is made if the student 
fails to secure his diploma. Students in Chemistry and Physics 
are charged for the supplies which they use. All bills are mailed 
to parents or guardians, or may be paid in person by the 
students. Class-room privileges will be denied to students 
whose bills are not settled on or before the dates mentioned 
above. As instructors must be engaged and other provisions 
for education must be made by the school authorities for the 
entire year in advance, tuition charges will not be refunded when 
students are suspended, dismissed, or withdrawn during the school 
year. Checks should be drawn in favor of the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy. 

T „ The regular tuition charge includes an allow- 

/ nfirTnaru 

ance of $10.00, credited to each student for 

service 

infirmary service, and entitling him to care and 
board — during illness — at the infirmary for a period not to 
exceed seven days during any one school year. Boys who are 
compelled to use the infirmary for longer periods are charged at 
the regular rate of $2.00 a day. Extra charges are made for 
operations and diseases requiring special nursing. At the dis- 
cretion of the Principal, this charge may be remitted in the case 
of scholarship boys. 

Athletic Fee ^ charge of $5.00 a term is made for the 
maintenance of athletics, but for scholarship 
applicants this charge is $3.00 a term which may be paid in 
whole or in part by the performance of special work assigned 
by the Treasurer. Three-fifths of the total amount of this 
charge is payable October 1st, and two-fifths on March 1st. In 

24 



return for this payment, students are granted free admission 
to all games played on the grounds or in the gymnasium, 
and are not asked to contribute further to the financial sup- 
port of the various school teams. 

„ n J Payments for student rooms in the school 
Room Rents , . , - „ , , 

buildings are required as iollows: tnree-nitns 

of the entire yearly rental on or before October 1 ; the remaining 
two-fifths on March 1. A deposit of $25.00, which will be 
credited to the first regular payment of room rent, is required 
when the contract for the room is filed and the assignment 
made. When a room is assigned to a student, his parent or 
guardian agrees by contract to pay the entire rental of the room 
up to the close of the current school year, whether the student con- 
tinues a member of the Academy or not. The right is reserved 
by the Trustees to transfer boys from room to room in the 
school buildings whenever changes seem desirable; such changes, 
however, do not relieve the original occupants from the obliga- 
tion of meeting the entire year's rent unless newcomers are 
secured to fill the vacancies. 

Beginning with the next school year all rooms will be fur- 
nished with a rug, desk, chiffoniere, chairs, bed, and bedding. 
Towels are not included. 

No refund of deposits will be made until the close of books for 
the fiscal year, June 30. 



SUMMARY OF PAYMENTS 



Tuition 1st payment, Oct. 1; $120.00 2nd payment, March 1; $80.00 

Athletic Fee: 1st " " 1; 9.00 2nd " " 1; 6.00 

Room: 1st " "1; three- 2nd " " 1; two- 
fifths of total charge. fifths of total charge. 
Deposit: Payable October 1; amount, $10.00. 
Graduation Fee: Payable March 1; amount, $8.00. 
Table Board: Payable one half-term in advance. 



25 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 



IT/-?/- tj ii Through the generosity of Prof. Edward H. 
Williams Hall T °, , . , 

^1 Dormiton for ™"" ams > ** T > °* tne c * ass °i 1868, the school 
Town 2?o? * n secured possession of a valuable piece of 
property for the housing and care of younger 
boys. The property, comprising several acres, adjoins the old 
campus and is within a short distance of the other school 
buildings. 

Williams Hall has attractive accommodations for twenty- 
four boys. The rooms are spacious, light, and airy, and are 
heated with hot water and lighted with electricity. On the 
main floor is a common reading and recreation room. Table 
board is furnished in the building to all occupants of the house. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to provide in this building sur- 
roundings as helpful as possible for the best development of 
young boys, and to this end they have placed it in charge of a 
married instructor. Boys whose work is below standard may 
be required to report at seven-thirty each evening, where they 
work under supervision and are free to consult the resident 
instructor and his assistant in regard to their studies. 

Williams Hall supplies a stepping-stone between the natural 
restrictions of the home and the somewhat freer life of a large 
school. Although the boys who live here have all the advan- 
tages that Phillips Academy offers, they are under somewhat 
closer supervision than is customary throughout the rest of the 
school. For the school year 1918-19 the charge for room and 
board in Williams Hall, not including the regular tuition charge, 
will be $550.00. A limited number of room scholarships are 
awarded annually in this hall. A special circular explaining 
in detail the equipment and arrangements of Williams Hall, 
and containing both interior and exterior views of this building, 
will be furnished on request. 



. TT The school provides for dormitory purposes 

t acuity Houses e i • , • x j 1 

eight houses formerly occupied as private dwel- 
lings. These houses are suitable for younger boys, especially 
those who are members of the two lower classes. Each house 
is in charge of a resident married instructor. The rooms are 
furnished, and the charges include heat, light, and care of the 
rooms. 

The Abbot House provides accommodations for nineteen 
boys, the Churchill House for seven, the Clement House for 
thirteen, the Farrar House for seven, the Hardy House for 
five, the Pease House for nine, the Tucker House for seven, 
and the Woods House for five. 

't 'e- Through the generous gifts of Mr. Melville C. 

Day of the class of 1858, Mr. Warren F. Draper 
of the class of 1843, and a number of citizens of Andover, and by 
the purchase of the property formerly belonging to the Andover 
Theological Seminary, the Academy now possesses thoroughly 
modern dormitories providing at reasonable rates attractive 
accommodations for almost the entire student body. Below is 
given a brief description of these various buildings, and a list 
of the prices of rooms in each will be found on page 31. With 
the exception of some of the Faculty Houses and Williams Hall 
these buildings are of brick. All are heated by steam, lighted 
by electricity, and equipped with shower-baths and the modern 
sanitary conveniences. Most of the study rooms have open 
fire-places. Each building or entry is in charge of a resident 
instructor. 

Phillips Hall, erected in 1808 and formerly the property of 
the Theological Seminary, was entirely remodelled in 1912. It 
is divided by a fire wall into two separate entries and provides 
accommodations for fourteen boys in each entry. 

Bartlet Hall, erected in 1817, and entirely rebuilt in 
1915, was formerly the property of the Theological Seminary. 
This building also is divided by a fire wall into two separate 

27 



entries, and contains both double and single suites, accommo- 
dating twenty-one boys in each entry. 

Pemberton Cottage, erected in 1891, contains five furnished 
double suites. 

Andover Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double 
suites, one single suite, and two single rooms, all furnished. 

Draper Cottage, erected in 1892, contains five furnished 
double suites. 

Eaton Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four furnished 
double suites and two furnished single suites. 

Bancroft Hall, erected in 1900, contains fourteen furnished 
double suites. The building is divided by fire walls into three 
separate entries, each entry accommodating ten boys. 

Day Hall, erected in 1911, contains twelve double suites, two 
single suites, and twenty single rooms. The building is divided 
by a fire wall into two separate entries, each entry accommo- 
dating twenty-three boys. Rooms in this building are fully 
furnished. 

Bishop Hall, erected in 1911, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Day Hall and accommodates the same 
number of boys. Rooms in this building are fully furnished. 

Adams Hall, erected in 1912, is divided into two separate 
entries, each of which, like the Faculty Houses, is in charge of 
a married instructor. The rooms in this building are fully fur- 
nished, and each entry accommodates eighteen boys. 

Taylor Hall, erected in 1913, accommodates eighteen boys 
in each of its two entries and is in charge of two married in- 
structors. Rooms in this building are fully furnished. 

(For prices of rooms and board see pages 31-33.) 

Main This recitation building was erected in 1865 

Building and contains twelve recitation rooms. 



28 



Graves Hall Graves Hall, devoted to Science, contains in 
addition to the large and well-equipped labora- 
tories for Physics and Chemistry, four recitation rooms, a 
lecture room, and a drafting room. 



TT „ Pearson Hall, formerly the propertv of the 
Pearson Hall . . . . * I T 

theological Seminary, is used lor recitation 

purposes. It contains six large recitation rooms. 

. , , This building contains rooms for the collection 

jy of the Department of Archaeology and a lecture 

room. 



Peabod House ^ ea ^ ^ House bears the name of the founders 
of the Archaeological department, with the 
funds of which it was erected. The building carries out the 
expressed wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody that their bene- 
faction should promote the social interests of the student body 
as well as further the study of American Archaeology. Quar- 
ters are provided for the Phillips Union and include a well- 
appointed grill, a large and attractive reading room, and a 
memorial room used as an assembly hall for receptions, lectures, 
and meetings of the various organizations of the school. 



. , . . . Brechin Hall, formerly used as the library of 

Administration r™ i • i o • i i • i 

Offices and theological Seminary, has been extensively 

T altered inside and is now used for administra- 

tive and library purposes. The lower floor 
contains the offices of the Principal, the Treasurer, and the 
Registrar. A large hall on the upper floor is devoted to the 
library of over ten thousand volumes, which is in charge of a 
trained librarian and is open daily for the use of students. 



29 



The Ch el ^ e ^ na P e ^ provides accommodations for the 
religious exercises of the school. The daily 
morning chapel exercises and the Sunday preaching and vesper 
services are held in this building. The Chapel contains the 
William Couch Egleston memorial organ. 

Borden ^ G ^ ca d em y nas a l ar & e gymnasium, com- 

r . pletely equipped with modern apparatus, and 

in charge of a Physical Director who is also 
the Medical Visitor. Students of all classes are required to take 
regular gymnasium work. 

Swimming Pool The swimmin 8 P ool > adjoining the gymnas- 
mm, is seventy-nve feet long and thirty leet 
wide, and represents the most modern ideas in swimming pool 
construction. The elaborate filtration plant in the basement of 
the building assures the purity of the water used in the pool. 

The swimming pool was constructed in 1910 with funds se- 
cured entirely by the efforts of the students themselves. 

Philli s Inn ^ e scno °^ P r0 P er ty includes a well-equipped 
hotel, situated in the centre of the grounds, 
under lease to a manager, and furnishing to parents and friends 
of the school quiet and comfortable accommodations. 

The Isham ^ e i ^ ca< ^ em y maintains an infirmary, the gen- 
j ' erous gift of Miss Flora E. Isham, whose name 

it bears. The infirmary was completed in 1912, 
is thoroughly modern in all its appointments, and was carefully 
planned under the direction of experts in hospital construction. 
In addition to the general wards, it contains single rooms for 
those requiring special treatment, an operating room, and quart- 
ers for visiting parents. The contagious wards are completely 
separated from the ordinary wards, and at each end of the build- 
ing there is a large sun parlor entirely encased in glass. Boys 
who are sufficiently indisposed to be unable to attend classes 
are sent to the infirmary for proper care. Except when special 



30 



arrangements have been made in advance by parents or guar- 
dians, the following regulations will be observed in the conduct 
of the infirmary. Patients at the infirmary requiring medical 
attention shall call in local physicians approved by the school 
authorities. In cases requiring the attendance of special- 
ists, the best men available in Boston will be called in con- 
sultation. In special emergencies, when operations seem 
necessary and parents cannot be consulted in advance, the 
Principal of the school assumes responsibility for authorizing 
such operations. The Physical Director may at any time 
examine and report upon individual cases. 

Athletic Brothers' Field, comprising twenty-three acres, 

Grounds 1S * n c ^ ose P roxmi ity to the gymnasium and 

contains ample facilities for baseball, foot- 
ball, and track athletics. The Academy possesses other exten- 
sive grounds for various athletic sports, including baseball, 
football, soccer, lacrosse, and tennis. It also provides two 
quarter-mile cinder running tracks, a pond for ice hockey, and 
an indoor rifle-range. 



PRICES OF ROOMS FOR 1918-1919 

SINGLE ROOMS 

$100.00. Andover, Nos. 3, 5; Pease, No. 14; Woods, No. 8; Clement, No. 6. 
$125.00. Churchill, No. 4; Hardy, Nos. 4, 5 
$135.00. Woods, No. 7. 

$150.00. Churchill, No. 6; Clement, Nos. 3, 5, 8; Taylor, Nos. 5, 12, 19, 26; 

Tucker, Nos. 2, 4, 5. 
$160.00. W T oods, No. 5. 

$175.00. Bishop, Nos. 15, 34; Churchill, No. 3; Clement Nos. 4, 7; Day, 
Nos. 15, 22, 34; Farrar, No. 3; Hardy, Nos. 1, 2, 3; Taylor, 
Nos 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27. 

31 



$200.00. Abbot, Nos. 11, 13, 14; Adams, Nos. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20; 

Bishop, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; 

Clement, No. 1; Day, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 

25, 26, 31, 32; Phillips, Nos. 3, 4, 7, 10, 14, 15, 18, 21; Taylor, 

Nos. 7, 14, 21, 28. 
$225.00. Clement (private bath), No. 2. 



SINGLE SUITES 

$200.00. Eaton, Nos. 3, 4. 
$225.00. Clement, No. 13. 

$250.00. Adams, Nos. 1, 7, 18, 24; Andover, No. 4; Bartlet, Nos. 4, 10, 11, 
14, 15, 16, 23, 24, 27, 28; Bishop, Nos. 7, 13, 36; Day, Nos. 13, 36. 



DOUBLE ROOMS 

$135.00. Abbot, Nos. 4, 5, 7, 16; Farrar, Nos. 4, 6; Pease, Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. 
$150.00. Churchill, Nos. 2, 5; Tucker, No. 3. 
$175.00. Tucker, No. 1. 



DOUBLE SUITES 
$160.00. Abbot, Nos. 6, 15; Farrar, No. 5. 

$175.00. Andover, Nos. 1, 6, 9; Bancroft, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 
18; Draper, Nos. 3, 5, 6; Eaton, Nos. 1, 5, 6; Pemberton, Nos. 1, 
3, 5, 6; Woods, No. 6. 

$200.00. Adams, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 23; Bartlet, Nos. 1, 2, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 30; Bishop, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 
33, 35; Day, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 33, 35; Phillips, 
Nos. 2, 12; Taylor, Nos. 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25. 

$225.00. Phillips, Nos. 1, 8, 11, 13, 19, 22. 

$275.00. Bartlet (private baths) Nos. 7, 20. 



fl oom About twenty "room scholarships" amount- 

q i j » . ing to approximately $50.00 each are available 

for deserving boys. These scholarships will be 
credited to the regular room charges on the recipients' term 
bills and will be awarded by the Principal to boys whose cir- 
cumstances compel them to keep their expenses at a low average. 



D 'n 'n Hall ^ e ec l u ^P men ^ °^ the Academy includes a well- 
appointed Dining Hall which is under the 
charge of a manager, and accommodates two hundred and fifty 
boys. The price of board for the coming year will be $6.00 a 
week. Extra orders are served at cost. 

Private About eighteen private houses in the vicinity of 

Houses ^ G Academy, under license from the Trustees, 

provide board and lodgings for students, 
and no student may occupy any house not thus licensed by the 
school. Some of the houses provide furnished rooms only; 
others provide rooms and board, and some furnish board for 
students rooming in neighboring houses. The price of table 
board is $7.50 to $9.00 a week. Students rooming in private 
families may, if they desire, board at the Dining Hall. The 
price of furnished rooms, including ordinary service, is from 
$3.00 to $6.50 a week. 

As engagements for rooms in private families continue to 
the end of the Academic year, care should be exercised in the 
selection of rooms. Engagements for table board may, on 
suitable notice, be terminated at the close of any term. Ar- 
rangements and payments for room and board in private houses 
must be made with those in charge of the houses. 



33 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND ENDOWMENT 



Scholarshi ^ C sums S rante< ^ as scholarships vary aecord- 

ing to the excellence of the boys in their 
studies, a student of the highest rank receiving 
a sum equivalent to the full tuition fee. Every new applicant 
for a scholarship must pay on entering the Academy the sum 
of $50 toward his tuition. This sum is not remitted. At the 
close of each term scholarships are adjusted in accordance 
with the student's record in his studies during that term. Boys 
of limited means who possess scholarly ability and ambition are 
encouraged to apply for admission, and, if admitted, may be 
reasonably sure of financial assistance. 

. , Furnished rooms are set apart in various 

~ . . r dormitories for boys who are obliged to keep 

Provision for . . . . ,, , . 

° h l h Tt their expenses withm the lowest possible 

P limits. A rental of $40 to $50 is charged each 

occupant of these rooms. Choice of room is determined by the 

scholarship rank of the applicant. 

Q 7/ 77 7 Ample opportunities are afforded by the Acad- 

emy to scholarship boys to earn a portion of 
their school charges. Service in the Dining Hall and boarding 
houses enables them to earn their board. Several agencies are 
assigned by the Bureau of Self Help and a number of students 
may earn a portion of the school charges by work in connec- 
tion with the school offices, and in caring for recitation rooms. 
An energetic boy may find various other chances for remunera- 
tive work. 

oil 7 • The Student's Educational Fund, begun with a 

p gift of $100 from the Senior Class of 1854, now 

amounts to $5,700. 

The Farrar Fund, a legacy from a former Treasurer, Samuel 
Farrar, established in 1865, amounts, with additions from 
income, to $22,000. 

34 



The Clarke Scholarship Fund of $1,200 was established in 1870 
in memory of Mrs. John Aiken Clarke. 

The Samuel H. Taylor Memorial Fund of $3,700 was estab- 
lished in 1871. 

The Peter Smith Byers Scholarship of $500 was established in 
1878 by the late John Byers. 

The Class of 1878 Scholarship Fund, established by the Classi- 
cal Class of 1878, amounts to $818.37. 

The Jonathan Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1878 by the late Edward Taylor in memory of his father. 

The French Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 1879 by 
the bequest of Hiram W. French. 

The Caroline Parker Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1880 by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy. 

The Alden Memorial Fund of $5,000, a legacy from the late 
Dr. Ebenezer Alden, was established in 1881. 

The Gerard Sumner Wiggin Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1881 by the bequest of Lady Elizabeth Sumner 
Buckley-Mathew Fleming. 

The Stone Educational Fund of $25,000 was established in 
1882 by Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Warren F. Draper Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Warren F. Draper. 

The Richards Scholarship of $1,450 was established in 1889 
by the late Mrs. Mary A. Richards in memory of her sons. 

The Charles L. Flint Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the bequest of Hon. Charles L. Flint. 

The Henry P. Haven Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1890 by the estate of Henry P. Haven. 

The Emma Lane Smyth Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1890 by the late Ex-Governor Frederick Smyth of New 
Hampshire. 

35 



The James and Per sis Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Mrs. Mary E. Fairbanks. 

The Dowe Scholarship Fund, established in 1892 by the be- 
quest of Joseph Dowe, amounts to $3,097.98. 

The John Cornell Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was established 
in 1894 by the bequest of John Cornell for pupils from the town 
of Andover. 

The James Calvin Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was founded 
in 1895 by his sister, the late Mrs. Mary W. Fairbanks. 

The Mary W. Holbrook Fund of $500 was founded in 1900 
by legacy of Mary W. Holbrook. 

The Edward Taylor Fund, a legacy from the late Edward 
Taylor, established in 1900, amounts to $1,000. 

The Ruby A. Carter Scholarship of $1,500 was founded in 1905 
by the late Mrs. Ruby A. Carter, in memory of her husband 
and daughter. 

The Herman Verhoeff Hartwell Scholarship of $2,000 was 
founded in 1907 by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Hartwell in memory 
of their son. 

The Timothy A. Holt Scholarship Fund of $26,000 was estab- 
lished in 1908 by the bequest of Timothy A. Holt, for the benefit 
of pupils from the town of Andover. 

The James Huntington Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1910 by the widow and daughter of James Huntington, 
P. A. 1848. 

The Charles Clayton Clough Memorial Fund of $220 was 
founded in 1912 by his friends. 

The Allan Morse Penfield Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1913 by the legacy of Allan Morse Penfield, P. A. 1904. 

The George B. Knapp Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1914 by a legacy of Miss Katherine Knapp. 

36 



The James Greenleaf Fuller Memorial Scholarship of $200 is 
sustained by Samuel Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, in memory of his 
brother, and is available during his Senior year for a student 
of limited means, who in the judgment of the Principal embodies 
the best ideals of school life in scholarship, character, and 
influence. 

The Class of 1871, Andover-Harvard Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by Henry S. Van Duzer, P. A. 1871, is awarded on the 
basis of high scholarship to a member of the Senior class who is 
preparing for Harvard; the award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his record 
up to that time. 

The Class of 1871 Harvard- Andover Scholarship of $300, also 
sustained by Henry S. Van Duzer, is available for a graduate of 
Phillips Academy during his Freshman year in Harvard Col- 
lege; the award, based on high scholarship, is made by the 
faculty of Phillips Academy, and is announced at the close of 
the recipient's Senior year in the school. 

The Henry P. Wright Scholarship of $300, sustained by an 
alumnus of the Academy in memory of Henry P. Wright, P. A. 
1863, late dean of Yale College, is awarded on the basis of high 
scholarship and character to a member of the Senior Class who 
is preparing for Yale. The award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, and on the basis of his 
record up to that time. 

The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship of fifty dollars 
is awarded annually to a member of the Academy, preference 
being given to a son of a member of the association. 

The John Reed Williams Scholarship at Yale is available to 
Phillips Academy graduates under the following terms of gift: 

"The income from the John Reed Williams Fund of one thousand dollars, 
* * * is awarded annually at the close of Freshman or Sophomore year, * * * 
to a member of the Academic Freshman or Sophomore class, preferably from 
Phillips Academy, Andover, who is helping to support himself by his own efforts 
and has proved himself to be a man of high character, and of large promise, 
especially in English Literature or History." 



37 



The Columbia University Scholarship. A scholarship, which 
practically amounts to the tuition charges, is granted by Colum- 
bia University each year to a student of Phillips Academy who 
has satisfied the full requirements for admission to the College, 
and whose standing in the Academy has been of sufficiently 
high grade to gain the recommendation of the school faculty. 
The scholarship may be renewed in the years following the 
Freshman year if a high grade is maintained. 

The Wesleyan University Scholarship. Wesleyan University 
grants each year to a student of Phillips Academy going to the 
University, a scholarship equal in amount to the tuition bill 
of the Freshman year. Provided the quality of his work 
warrants it, the scholarship is renewed each year throughout 
the college course. The award is made to that student whose 
high scholarship, in the opinion of the Academy Faculty, en- 
titles him to the scholarship. 

In addition to these scholarships, prizes amounting to $790.00 
are awarded annually. The conditions governing these prizes 
are given on pages 54 — 59. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY 



As the subjects are taught with a view to the student's pro- 
gressive development, it is desirable for him to take the entire 
course in the Academy. In order that he may plan his work to 
the greatest advantage, it is important that he decide as early 
as possible upon the higher institution which he intends to enter. 
He is designated as a classical or a scientific student in accord- 
ance with the character and requirements of the institution 
selected. The course of study is designed to furnish adequate 
preparation for any college or scientific school. 

Note — In order to define the work of the pupil in his last year, it is required 
that he take preliminary examinations for some college. June examinations, 
both preliminary and final, are held in Andover by the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 



THE CLASSICAL COURSE 



Required Hrs. 
Latin 1 5 
English 1 4 
Algebra 1 5 
Physical Training 3 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR 

Electives (5) H RS. 
French 1 5 Two class exercises with- 

5 out home study count as 



German 1 
Choir 



one hour 



17 



Required 
Latin 2 5 
English 2 3 (with Public 

Algebra 2 \ Speaking) 

Plane Geometry 1 / 4 
French 2 

or 4 
German 2 

Physical Training 3 



CLASS III — LOWER MIDDLE 

Electives (4) 



Greek 1 
French 1 
German 1 
Choir 



19 



39 



CLASS II — UPPER MIDDLE 



Required 




Electives (6-8) 




t *: 3 
Latin 


5 


Greek 


5 


English 3 


3 


i 1 

Greek 1 


4 


Algebra 3 


1 

5 


Greek Testament 


1 


Plane Geometry 2 i 


1 


Tr~.~~ 3 2 1 

r rencn , or 


4 


Physical Training 


3 


3 2 1 

German , * or 1 


4 






American History 


4 




16 


fAncient History 


5 






English History 


5 






Classical History 


2 






Physics 


* 4 






Chemistry 


* 4 






Choir 


1 



Required 
English 4 

Physical Training 



CLASS I — SENIOR 

Electives 

Latin (Horace) 1 

Latin 4 5 

Greek Testament 1 

Greek 3 4 

Greek 2 5 

American History 4 

fAncient History 5 

English History 5 

European History 1 

Physics *4 

Chemistry *4 
Trigonometry and 

Solid Geometry 4 



(16 or 17) 

Algebra 4 (Advanced) 2 

Mech. Drawing **3 

French 3 or French 2 4 

French 4 2 

German 3 or German 2 4 

German 4 2 

Spanish 4 

Public Speaking 2 

Bible 2 2 

Harmony 2 

Archaeology 1 

Choir 1 



Numbers placed at the right and above a subject indicate successive courses in the same 
•ubject. 

fNot open to those who elect Classical History. 

*Each laboratory period occupies 2 hours, but counts only 1 hour on the schedule. 
**Mechanicai Drawing takes 6 hours of time, but counts only 3 hours on the schedule. 



THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



Required Hrs. 



Latin 1 
English 1 
Algebra 1 

Physical Training 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR 
Electives (5) 
French 1 
German 1 



Choir 



Hrs. 

5 Two class exercises with- 
5 out home study count 
one hour 



40 



CLASS C — LOWER MIDDLE 



Required 
Latin 2 
English" 
Algebra" 
Plane Geometry 1 
French 2 



u 



(with Public 
Speaking) 



Ehctives (4) 
French 1 
German 1 
General Science 
1 



Bible 
Choir 



German 

Physical Training 



23 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLE 



Required 
English 3 3 
Algebra 3 \ g 

Plane Geometry 2 / 
French 3 or French 1 

or 4 
German 3 or German 1 
Physics 

or *4 
Chemistry 

Physical Training 3 



Eledives (4 or 5) 
French 2 or French 1 
German 2 or German 
Latin 3 

American History 
fAncient History 
English History 
Choir 



19 



CLASS A — SENIOR 
Required Eledives (12 or 13) 



English 4 


4 


French 3 or French 2 


4 


Mech. Drawing 


**3 


Trigonometry and 




French 4 


2 


Chemistry 


*4 


Solid Geometry 


4 


German 3 or German 2 


4 


Physics 


* 4 


Physical Training 


3 


German 4 


2 


Bible 2 


2 






Latin 4 


5 


Public Speaking 


2 




11 


Spanish 


4 


Harmony 


2 






American History 


4 


European History 


1 






fAncient History 


5 


Archaeology 


1 






English History 


5 


Choir 


1 






Algebra 4 (Advanced) 


2 







Diplomas are granted to students who secure passing grades in 73 hours, exclusive of 
Physical Training, in either of the courses of study, provided that they pass in all of the work 
assigned to them in the senior year. A schedule of at least 20 hours, exclusive of Physical 
Training, is assigned to all seniors. 

All seniors must report to the Librarian for instruction in the use of the library. 



41 



STATEMENTS OF COURSES 



GREEK 

The first year (Class III) is devoted mainly to forms and the 
most essential principles of syntax. Benner and Smyth's Be- 
ginner's Greek Booh is used. To aid the memorizing of inflec- 
tions. and vocabularies there are daily exercises, both oral and 
written, enforced by incessant drill. In the third term Xeno- 
phon's Anabasis is begun and the reading extends at least 
through the first three chapters of Book I. 

The second year (Class II) is occupied with Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-IV, sight reading, translation from English 
into Greek, and grammar reviews. Great effort is made to 
secure simple, idiomatic English in both oral and written work. 
Grammar and composition are studied throughout the year 
and occupy a part of every recitation period. 

There is an elective course in the Greek Testament — one 
hour a week — open to both Upper Middlers and Seniors. 

The third year (Class I) is spent mainly in reading selected 
books of the Iliad and the Odyssey. After the dialect is mas- 
tered, more attention is given to the literary side of the poems 
and to the translation of Homer at sight, about 5000 verses 
being read during the year. 

LATIN 

The work of the Junior year consists of thorough drill in the 
essentials of the grammar, and training in methods of study. 
There is constant practice in the writing of Latin. In the spring 
term, Book II of Caesar's Gallic War, or an equivalent amount 
of Latin selections, is read.* 

The Junior work is designed for five periods of fifty-three minutes each a week. This 
necessarily implies a larger total of work for the year than that of the average High School. 
Students preparing for the Lower Middle work should take notice of this fact. 



In the Lower Middle year Books I, III, IV, or V of the Gallic 
War, and about ten Lives of Xepos, or an equivalent in selec- 
tions, are read. There is continued study of Latin prose com- 
position and syntax, of word formation, and of method in sight 
translation. 

In the L'pper Middle year the course in Cicero aims to render 
the student familiar with the chief characteristics of Cicero's 
oratory, with his life, and with the history and antiquities of 
his time. The work in Latin prose composition is devoted to 
connected narrative based on the text studied. The Catili- 
narian Orations, the Monition Law, the Archias, the Marcellus, 
and the Milo or de Senectute or Sallust's Catiline are read. 
There is also sight reading. 

In the Senior year poetic diction and prosody receive atten- 
tion and every effort is made to cultivate a sympathetic appre- 
ciation of good literature. Books I— VI of the *Eneid, and the 
Bucolics or an equivalent amount from the Metamorphoses of 
Ovid, or Cicero's de Amicitia are read, with additional practice 
in reading at sight. Topics in the private life and customs of 
the Romans are studied. 

FRENCH 

The first year's work in French (Classes III, C, and IV) 
comprises the principles of pronunciation, drill in the funda- 
mentals of grammar including the inflections of the regular and 
the more common irregular verbs, of nouns, of adjectives, of 
participles, of pronouns; the uses of pronouns, the simple uses 
of the conditional and subjunctive, and the elementary rules of 
syntax; abundant easy exercises for oral translation into French, 
and the reading of about two hundred pages of easy French 
prose. The following texts have been used. Kuhn's Reader, 
Super's Reader, Aldrich & Foster's Reader, La Tvlipe Noire, 
LEte de la Saint-Martin, Sans Famille, and Fraser and Squair, 
and Aldrich and Foster Grammars. 



43 



The second-year course of four hours completes the elemen- 
tary course in French and consists of a review of elementary 
grammar and continued work in composition and translation. 
Such texts as Colomba, La Mere de la Marquise, Le Roi des 
Montagues, Syntax of the French Verb, Comfort's Composition 
have been used. 

The third year covers the work of the college examination 
for Intermediate French. Contes de Daudet, La Debacle, Les 
MisSrables, and similar texts furnish material for translation 
and work in composition and grammar is done throughout the 
year. 

The fourth-year work consists of rapid reading and trans- 
lation of selected passages from English authors, with discussion 
of helpful topics in French history and literature as they come 
in the course. This course is for those who have passed the 
College examinations and who wish to continue their work in 
the language. 

GERMAN 

The first year's work in German (Classes III, C and IV) com- 
prises the principles of pronunciation, drill in the inflection of the 
articles and the commoner nouns, adjectives, pronouns, and 
weak and strong verbs, also in the use of prepositions, the simpler 
uses of the modal auxiliaries, and the elementary rules of syntax 
and word order; abundant easy exercises for translation into 
German; and the translation of about 150 pages of easy German 
prose, such as is contained in Huss's or Nichols's Readers, 
Bacon's Vorwarts, Heyse's Niels mit der Offenen Hand, Lean- 
der's Traumereien and Gerstacker's Germelshausen. In class 
IV, Bacon's New German Grammar has been used; in classes 
III and C, Wesselhoeft's Elementary German Grammar, 
Duerr's Essentials of German Grammar and Chiles's German 
Prose Composition. 

The second-year course which completes the elemen- 
tary work in German, comprises a thorough review of 

44 



elementary grammar, as outlined above, and continued trans- 
lation and composition. Ham and Leonard's German Grammar 
has been used in these classes, and texts such as the following 
have been studied: Heyse's Anfang und Ende, Hillern's Hdher 
als die Kirche, Riehl's Burg Neideck, Rosegger's Das Holzknecht- 
haus, Wildenbruch's Das Edle Blut, and Zschokke's Das Wirts- 
hans zu Cransac. 

The third year's work prepares for the examination in 
Intermediate German (German B) as set by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Such texts as Freytag's 
Die Journalisten, Heine's Harzreise, Keller's Kleider machen 
Leute, Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans, Wilhelm Tell, Der Dreis- 
sijaghrige Krieg III and Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea are 
read and advanced grammar and composition are studied 
throughout the year. Bernstorff's Handbook of German Gram- 
mar and Pope's composition books have been used in this work. 

The fourth year course of two hours a week consists in 
the rapid reading and discussion of classic and modern 
prose and poetry, readings in the history of German literature, 
and supplementary lectures by the instructor. This course is an 
elective, open to those who have passed the third year's work 
in German or the College Entrance Examination Board's "Ger- 
man B"; also, upon consultation with the instructor, to others 
who can satisfy him of their ability to do the work of the course. 
Students in this class are not recommended for additional 
college credits in German. 

SPANISH 

The year's work in Spanish (Senior elective) is as follows: — 
(a) thorough drill in the principles of pronunciation; (6) rules of 
syntax and essentials of Spanish grammar including the in- 
flection of verbs (regular and irregular), nouns, adjectives, 
pronouns, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions, the uses of 
the conditional and subjunctive; (c) abundant easy exercises for 



45 



translation into Spanish; (d) the translation of two hundred or 
more pages of easy Spanish prose, such as is contained in Hill's 
Spanish Tales, Berge-Soler and Hatheway's Reader, Morrison's 
Tres Comedias, Alarcon's Short Stories, Isaacs's Maria and 
Supple's Spanish Reader; grammars such as Hill and Ford's, 
De Vitis's, and Olmstead and Gordon's; (e) selections from 
Crawford's Prose Composition and elementary work in Spanish 
correspondence during the final term of the course. 

ENGLISH 

The work in composition in the Junior year is based on weekly 
themes, written outside of class, — simple narratives and des- 
criptions, and, less often, simple expositions and arguments, — 
on subjects chosen from the student's observation and experi- 
ence, or suggested by his reading and imagination. This work is 
supplemented by frequent themes written in class. Attention 
is given to the correction of common grammatical errors in 
speech and writing, with such consideration of theoretical gram- 
mar as may be involved in explaining the faults in question; 
to the simpler matters of punctuation; to spelling; and to the 
building up of vocabulary. Considerable emphasis is laid on 
reading aloud. The work in literature consists of a somewhat 
close study of several suitable books or selections, chosen 
from English and American literature, — narrative prose and 
poetry, chiefly of the romantic and heroic type, and some 
simple lyric poetry; a more rapid and informal reading, optional 
or required, of a number of books or selections of a similar sort; 
a brief study of the lives of a few of the authors. Among the 
books prescribed are: St. Ives; Quentin Durward; Nicholas 
Nickleby; Les Miserables. 

In the teaching of composition in the Lower Middle year the 
general plan of the preceding year is continued, with a somewhat 
higher standard of requirement, the chief object being to secure 
plenty of practice in writing. The study of literature com- 
prises the careful reading of some selected books, and the rapid 

46 



reading of others, as in the Junior year. Among the books 
prescribed are: Richard II; Dr. Jehyll and Mr. Hyde; The 
Woman in White; The Moonstone; The Ebb Tide; Gawain and the 
Green Knight. Particular attention is given to oral English, 
each student being required to deliver two carefully prepared 
original speeches each term and to read aloud in the class-room 
as frequently as possible. 

In the Upper Middle year the study of formal rhetoric is 
begun. As many themes as possible are written outside of 
class, and there is considerable writing in the class-room. The 
course in literature includes a careful reading of seven books se- 
lected from the groups prescribed in the list for reading (a) 
in the College Entrance Requirements; the lives of the authors; 
and the rapid reading, optional or required, of as many other 
books as possible. 

In the Senior year the principles of composition-rhetoric 
studied in the preceding year are reviewed with a higher stand- 
ard of requirement in their application to writing. Weekly 
or bi-weekly themes and writing in the class-room are required, 
as in the Upper Middle year. The course in composition gives 
final preparation for the comprehensive examination offered by 
the College Entrance Examination Board. The course in 
literature, which also prepares for this examination, includes 
a rapid reading of some books and a careful study of others; 
the life and times of the chief authors; and as much supple- 
mentary reading as possible. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Public Speaking is taken up as part of the Lower Middle 
English course. 

The work of the Senior year comprises training in the prepara- 
tion and delivery of expositions, argumentative speeches, and 
debates. A considerable amount of oral reading is done 
throughout the course. 

47 



ENGLISH BIBLE 

In the two curriculum courses the Bible is studied as an 
English classic. Attention is constantly given to the Biblical 
sources of quotations and allusions. The methods and stand- 
ards are those of the other school studies. Each of the courses 
extends through a year, with two recitation periods each week. 

After the present year the first course (for Lower Middlers) 
will consist of all the narratives of the Old Testament as ren- 
dered in the King James version. Sheffield's The Old Testa- 
ment Narrative will be the textbook. 

The second course (for Seniors) includes the historical books 
of the Old Testament and numerous selections from the poetical 
and prophetical writings. The textbook is the complete Old 
Testament in the King James version as published in four 
volumes in "Everyman's Library" under the title Ancient 
Hebrew Literature. 

ALGEBRA 

The study of Algebra is begun in the Junior year in a course 
occupying five hours a week throughout the year. Slaught and 
Lennes' Elementary Algebra is used as a textbook and chapters 
I-XI and XIII-XVIII, omitting imaginary numbers, are 
completed. 

In the Lower Middle year the work of the preceding year 
is continued with four recitations a week during the fall term. 
The subjects to which most attention is given are radicals, 
exponents, and quadratic equations in one unknown. 

The course in Elementary Algebra is completed in the Upper 
Middle year, and includes in that year more difficult work on 
the topics already studied and advance work in ratio and 
proportion, simultaneous quadratic equations, the progressions, 
and the binomial theorem. Five recitations a week during the 
fall term and three during the spring term are held. 

48 



ADVANCED ALGEBRA 

The two-hour Senior course, Algebra 4 , covers the topics in 
Advanced Algebra specified by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board and meets the entrance requirements of all colleges 
and scientific schools. If not offered for admission it may be 
used to secure advanced credit at some colleges. 

GEOMETRY 

Demonstrative Plane Geometry is taken up in the Lower 
Middle year. Four recitations a week during the winter and 
spring terms are given to the subject. In the work of this year 
the chief aim of the instruction is to develop in each student 
the ability to reason clearly and logically. Accuracy, clearness, 
and completeness of statement are insisted upon. To develop 
originality and independence of thought as much time as 
possible (from one-third to one-half) is devoted to the solution 
of exercises of gradually increasing difficulty. The examination 
for admission to the L'pper Middle classes tests not only the 
candidate's knowledge of the usual propositions of Books I, II, 
III, and IV, but also his ability to solve exercises of moderate 
difficulty. 

During the Upper Middle year the same objects of instruction 
are sought, a rapid review is taken, Book V is covered, and much 
time (from one-half to three-quarters) is given to work on 
exercises. Five recitations a week during the winter term and 
two during the spring term are allotted to the course. 

In the Senior year Solid Geometry is taught four hours a 
week during the whiter term and two hours during the spring 
term. The course meets the entrance requirements of all col- 
leges and scientific schools, and, when not offered for admission, 
may be substituted for Freshman work in the subject. 

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY 
This course, four hours a week during the fall term and two 
hours during the spring term, with Solid Geometry, forms a 

49 



full four-hour course for the Senior year. It meets the entrance 
requirements of all colleges and scientific schools, and may be 
substituted for Freshman work in the subject, if not used toward 
admission. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

This course consists of six hours a week, throughout the 
Senior year. It includes use of drawing instruments, lettering, 
geometric constructions, orthographic and isometric pro- 
jections, developments, intersections, and working drawings to 
scale from isometric drawings and from original free hand 
sketches of objects. Especial stress is laid on a thorough 
mastering of the fundamentals. The course meets the require- 
ments of the College Entrance Examination Board, and students 
of exceptional ability are given an opportunity to do more 
advanced work in machine drawing. 

PHYSICS 

The instruction in Physics is given by the use of a textbook 
and by practical work in the laboratory. The text is accom- 
panied with numerical examples and by qualitative experiments 
designed to illustrate physical laws and their application to 
practical life. 

Forty or more quantitative laboratory experiments are re- 
quired of each pupil. A careful record of the steps and results 
of these exercises is kept in a note-book, which is submitted to 
the instructor for approval. 

CHEMISTRY 

The sections of the class in Chemistry, each meeting four 
times a week, cover the same ground and prepare for the 
entrance examinations in Chemistry of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 



50 



GENERAL SCIENCE 



In two hours a week throughout the year, some half-dozen 
of the greater doctrines of natural science are approached from 
the cultural rather than the technical side, with especial atten- 
tion, on the one hand, to their historical development, and on 
the other, to their relation to every-day phenomena. The 
course is also, in part, a preparation for the more detailed 
studies which follow, and is correlated with the instruction 
in English of its own year. 

ARCHAEOLOGY 

The work of the department is chiefly confined to the United 
States, and research in other subjects than American archaeology 
is not extensively attempted. 

At present the collections number about 96,000 specimens, 
all of which represent the stone age art. 

The publications of the department number seven — Bulletin 
No. 1, on the Exploration of Jacob's Cavern; No. 2, The Gor- 
gets; No. 3, Field Work in Ohio, Tennessee. Kentucky. Arizona, 
and New Mexico; No. 4, The Exploration of Bushey Cavern and 
the Exploration of Fort Ancient; No. o, A Study and Descrip- 
tion of the Seven Prehistoric Earthworks found near Andover; 
No. 6, A Study of Hematite Implements found in the United 
States. The Red Paint People of Maine (preliminary paper). 

The Stone Age in Xorth America, a work in two volumes, 
written by the Curator, was published in 1910. 

HISTORY 

Courses are offered in the history of Greece and Rome, 
English history, American history, and in the History of Europe 
since 186-2. 



51 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 



All students are required to take some form of exercise during 
the school year. Upon entering the school each boy receives 
a careful physical and medical examination, and a form of 
exercise suited to his peculiar needs is advised. Special atten- 
tion is given to those who lack normal development. The 
school, class, and squad teams give all students an opportunity 
to compete in sports with those of their own relative ability. 
No student is allowed to compete on school teams unless per- 
mission indicating his fitness is received from the Physical 
Director. 

MILITARY TRAINING 

Military training was established as a part of the regular 
curriculum at the opening of the current school year. It is re- 
quired of all members of the Senior and Upper Middle classes, 
and of those members of the two lower classes who have reached 
the age of sixteen years. For all others this work is voluntary. 
The interest of students and parents in this new department is 
attested by the fact that over five hundred boys have been en- 
rolled in the school regiment. Major Robert N. Davy, of the 
Canadian Expeditionary Forces, is in charge of this work, being 
ably assisted by Doctor Peirson S. Page of the Faculty and his 
assistant, Mr. Montville E. Peck, both of whom have been mem- 
bers of Plattsburg camps. The time usually given to athletics 
has been divided between athletics and military training, 
while additional time has been given to officers training classes, 
bayonet drill, signaling, first aid, topography, etc. Members 
of the regiment are required to furnish a prescribed uniform. 
As it is desirable, though not imperative, that the uniform 
should be secured previous to the student's entrance to the 
school, detailed specifications will be furnished on request. 



52 



MUSIC 



Opportunity for the study of piano and organ is offered by 
the Director of Music. 

A two-hour course in Harmony has been added to the cur- 
riculum as a regular Senior elective, this course preparing for 
the College Entrance Board Examination. 

Students who sing in the choir, every member having two 
rehearsals a week, are offered one of three forms of compen- 
sation; (a) financial; (b) one athletic cut a week; (c) permission 
to count the choir work as one schedule hour. 

A series of recitals is given in the school chapel on the "Wednes- 
day afternoons of the winter term. The series for the year 
1917-1918 consisted of six organ recitals, all by visiting or- 
ganists, one song recital, two piano recitals, two recitals of 
music for piano and organ, and one trio recital. 

An innovation in the exercises of Commencement week this 
year will be a Musical Symposium in which all the serious 
musical activities of the school will be represented. 



53 



PRIZES 



The following prizes are offered annually for proficiency in 
the work of the several departments: 

IN ENGLISH 

The Draper Prizes for Selected Declamations, founded in 1866 
by the late Warren F. Draper, of the class of 1843, of Andover. 
Prizes of twenty -five dollars and of fifteen dollars are awarded. 
The competition is open to all students. A preliminary trial 
before a committee is held early in May, the final competitors 
being chosen on the basis of the best rendered selections. 
The fifty-first competition occurred June 13, 1917. 

The Means Prizes for Original Declamations, founded in 1867 
by the late William G. Means, of Boston. Prizes of twenty 
dollars, of twelve dollars, and of eight dollars are awarded. 
Students in any class may compete. Eight are selected for the 
final competition by the judges who later act as a committee 
of award, the prizes being given on the merits of both composi- 
tion and delivery. The fiftieth competition was held April 
21, 1917. 

The Robinson Prizes for Debate, founded in 1896 by the late 
H. S. Robinson, of Andover, are open to three members of the 
Philomathean debating society and a team chosen from the 
school. A prize of thirty dollars is awarded to the representa- 
tives presenting the better argument, irrespective of the merits of 
the question. The twenty-second competition occurred May 
25, 1917. 

The Andrew Potter Prizes, sustained since 1904 by James 
Tracy Potter, of the class of 1890, in memory of his father and 
brother. Two prizes of thirty dollars and twenty dollars 



54 



respectively are offered to those members of the graduating 
class who shall deliver, at the Commencement exercises in 
June, the best essays on assigned subjects. The competition 
is open to Seniors. The fourteenth competition was held June 
15, 1917. 

The Schweppe Prizes, sustained by Charles H. Schweppe of 
the class of 1898. Two prizes, one of thirty dollars and one of 
twenty dollars, are awarded for excellence in English, and are 
open to members of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. The 
sixth competition occurred in June, 1917. 

The Goodhve English Prizes, established in 1916 by the family 
of the late Francis A. Goodhue of Andover, in memory of his 
devotion to Phillips Academy. Two prizes are offered, one of 
fifteen dollars and one of ten dollars, for excellence in English 
literature and composition, including the more practical topics 
of elementary rhetoric. The competition is open to members 
of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. 

IX GREEK 

The Joseph Cook Greek Prizes, founded in 1879 by the late 
Joseph Cook, D.D., of the class of 1857. The prizes are fifteen, 
ten, and five dollars respectively. The special topics included 
in the fortieth competition, June, 1919, will be translations 
at sight: 

1. From Homer. 

2. From Attic Greek Prose. 

There will also be questions on Greek literature and antiquities. 

IN LATIN 

The Dove Latin Prizes, sustained from 1880 to 1908 by the 
late George W. W. Dove, of the class of 1853, of Andover, and 
continued by his sons. The prizes of twenty, fifteen, and ten 
dollars are awarded for excellence in Latin and are open to 
Seniors. 



55 



IN THE CLASSICS 

The Valpey Classical Prizes, founded in 1893 by the late Rev. 
Thomas G. Valpey, of the class of 1854. Two prizes of ten 
dollars each are awarded; one for excellence in Latin Composi- 
tion, one for excellence in Greek Composition. The competi- 
tion is open to members of the Upper Middle class. The 
twenty-second competition occurred in June, 1917. 

IN MATHEMATICS 

The Convers Mathematical Prizes, founded in 1897 by the late 
E. B. Convers, Esq., of the class of 1857, of Englewood, N. J. 
Three prizes of twenty dollars, fifteen dollars, and ten dollars 
are awarded for excellence in the mathematics of the Classical 
Department, to be determined by an examination held in May. 

IN PHYSICS 

The Wadsworth Prize, sustained since 1900 by William S. 
Wadsworth, M.D., of the class of 1887, a prize of ten dollars, is 
awarded to that member of the Scientific Department who has 
obtained the highest rank in Physics for the year. 

IN GERMAN 

The Robert Stevenson German Prize, founded in 1904 by Robert 
Stevenson, Jr., of the class of 1896, in memory of his father, A 
prize of twelve dollars is awarded for excellence in German 
composition. The competition is open to Seniors and Upper 
Middlers of both departments. 

The John Aiken German Prizes, two prizes, one of thirty dollars 
and one of twenty dollars, are sustained by a member of the 
class of 1873 in memory of John Aiken, a member of the Board 
of Trustees from 1845 to 1863. The competition is open to 
Seniors and Upper Middlers of both departments, and the 
examination, based on which the prizes are awarded, will con- 
tain questions on German geography, a specified period of 
German history, the lives and writings of German authors 

56 



previously assigned, and one or more passages of German prose 
or poetry for translation into English. 

IN FRENCH 

The Frederic Holkins Taylor Prize was founded in 1908 by an 
anonymous friend of the class of 1868. A prize of eight dollars 
is awarded for excellence in French conversation or French 
composition. 

IN AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY 

A prize of twenty-five dollars is awarded annually to that 
member of the class in American Archseology who maintains 
the highest standing in the course. 

IN CHEMISTRY 

The Dalton Prize in Chemistry, a prize of fifty dollars, founded 
in 1915 by Frederick Goodrich Crane, P. A. 1884, is awarded 
annually to that student maintaining the highest rank in 
Chemistry for the year. 

IN HISTORY 

The Snell History Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained 
by Hon. Bertrand H. Snell, of Potsdam, N. Y., for excellence in 
American History. 

The George Lander Prize was founded in memory of George 
Lauder of the class of P. S. 1897. A prize of fifty dollars is 
awarded for excellence in English History. 

FOR ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

The Butler-Thwing Prize, a prize of fifteen dollars, founded 
by Capt. Francis Butler Thwing of the class of 1908 is 

57 



awarded annually to that member of the Junior class who has 
secured the highest average in his examinations for entrance 
to the Academy. 

FOR HIGH SCHOLARSHIP 

The Faculty Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by San- 
ford H. E. Freund, P. A. '97, is awarded annually to that mem- 
ber of the graduating class who has attained the highest general 
average in scholarship. 

IN GENERAL EXCELLENCE 

The Fuller Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by Samuel 
Lester Fuller, P. A. '94, is awarded at his graduation to that 
member of the class who has best exemplified and upheld in 
his work and life at Andover the ideals and traditions of Phillips 
Academy. Only those who have been members of the school 
for at least two full academic years are eligible for this prize. 

The Otis Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained by Joseph 
E. Otis, P. A. '88, and is awarded to that member of the Senior 
class who, having been a member of the school for at least three 
years, has, in the judgment of the Faculty, shown the greatest 
general improvement. 

The Boston Yale Club Cup is awarded annually by the Yale 
Club of Boston to that member of the Senior class who attains 
the highest proficiency in scholarship and athletics. 

The Federation of Harvard Clubs Prize. The New England 
Federation of Harvard Clubs awards annually to that student 
who is taking the preliminary examination for Harvard College 
and is, in the judgment of the authorities of the Academy, 
best fitted to receive it, a set of books of some standard author. 
In the award excellence in scholarship may be combined with 
either excellence in manly sports or with any example of dis- 
tinguished moral courage or endeavor. 

A number of prize scholarships are awarded each June. The 
conditions governing these awards may be found on pages 37-38. 



5S 



AWARD OF PRIZES, 1817-1918 



The Draper 
Prizes 

The Means 
Prizes 



(1) George Ellsworth Gale, Jr., Pawtucket, R. I. 

(2) Roger Brush Haviland, Gloversville, N. Y. 

(1) Richard Adamson Lumpkin, Mattoon, 111. 

(2) William Boardman Knox, Andover. 

(3) William Smith Clark, Cambridge. 



The 

Robinson Prizes 



(1) 
(2) 

(3) 

The (1) 
Andrew Potter Prizes (2) 



The 

Schiceppe Prizes 
The 

Goodhue Prizes 



The 
Cook Prizes 



The 
Dove Prizes 



The 

Valpey Prizes 



(1) 
(2) 

(1) 
(2) 



Powers Hapgood, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Harry Klock Schauffler, Kansas City, Mo. 
Elmer Reese Beeler, Norfolk, Neb. 

Raymond Thomas Rich, Hingham Center. 
Edgar Ott Richards, Easton, Pa. 

Howard Holton Noyes, Kenwood, N. Y. 
Harry Klock Schauffler, Kansas City, Mo. 

Graham Penfield, Evanston, 111. 

James Sayre Pickering, East Orange, N. J. 



The 
Corners Prize 

The 

Wadsworth Prize 

Special Prize 
in Physics 

The 

Robert Stevenson 
German Prize 



(1) and (2) Divided between 

William Smith Clark, Cambridge 
Theodore Chase Greene, Baltimore, Md. 

(3) Not awarded. 

(1) Raymond Thomas Rich, Hingham Center. 

(2) Alvin Frederick Cohen, Summer ville, S. C. 

(3) Not awarded. 

Latin — Porter Stevens Dickinson, Lunenburg. 
Greek — Carlton Farrar Heard, Manchester, N. H. 

Special Second Prize 
Greek Composition — Robert Murdoch Miller, Plain- 
field, N. J. 

Honorable Mention 
Leonard North Seymour, Elgin, Neb. 
Nathaniel Tyler Lane, St. Louis, Mo. 

(1) George Eaton Dresser, Chicopee 

(2) Sewall Arthur Jones, Andover. 

(3) Louis Gregg Neville, Jr., Wellesley Hills. 

Crawford Fairbanks Failev, Terre Haute, Ind. 



Theodore Chase Greene, Baltimore, Md. 

Harold Hunter Schaff, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Honorable Mention 
John Manning Phillips, Andover. 
James Milton DeCamp, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



59 



The (1) 
John Aiken ^ 
German Prizes 

The 
Fuller Prize 

The 
Otis Prize 

The 

Frederic Holkins 
Taylor Prize 

The American 
Archaeology Prize 

The 
Snell History 
Prize 

The 
George Lauder 
History Prize 

The Dalion 
Chemistry Prize 

The 
Faculty Prize 

The 

Boston Yale Club 
Cup 

The New England 
Federation of 
Harvard Clubs Prize 

The 

Harvard- A ndover 
Scholarships 

The James 
Greenleaf Fuller 
Memorial Scholarship 

The 

P.A.'W-Harvard '98 
Scholarship 

The 

Butler-Thwing Prize 
The 

Harmony Prize 



George Van Siclen Smith, Richmond Hill, L. I., N. Y. 
Harold Hunter Schaff, Pittsburg, Pa. 

William Watson Russell, Oak Hill, N. B., Canada. 

Edgar Ott Richards, Easton, Pa. 

James Sayre Pickering, East Orange, N. J. 

Alvin Frederick Cohen, Summerville, S. C. 

Edgar Ott Richards, Easton, Pa. 

Ferris Baldwin Briggs, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Raymond Thomas Rich, Hingham Center. 
Alvin Frederick Cohen, Summerville, S. C. 

George Eaton Dresser, Chicopee. 
Donald Carter Starr, Winchester. 



Edgar Ott Richards, Easton, Pa. 

George Van Siclen Smith, Richmond Hill, L. I., N. Y. 



Frank Mathias Talmage, Great Barrington. 



Leland Dyer Baker, Provincetown. 



Alexander Watters Dole, Bangor, Maine. 

Divided between 
Roderick Bissell Jones, Winsted, Conn. 
Arthur Ward Spence, Lowell. 



60 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS, 1916-1917 



HONORS OF THE FIRST GRADE 



Awarded to those who have no grade lower than 82 and a grade of at least 
92 in half the number of hours. 
Seniors — 



A. F. Cohen 3 terms 
C. F. Heard 2 terms 
W. B. Purinton 1 term 

Upper Middlers — 

P. S. Dickinson 3 terms 

S. Nichols 3 terms 

J. M. Phillips 1 term 

Lower Middlers — 

B. Haskell, Jr. 1 term 
Juniors — 

E. F. Hatch 2 terms 



R. T. Rich 
E. O. Richards 



L. N. Seymour 
G. V. S. Smith 
D. C. Starr 

R. Martin 

J. M. Hopkins 
SECOND GRADE 



3 terms 
1 term 



1 term 
3 terms 

2 terms 

1 term 

3 terms 



HONORS OF THE 
Awarded to those who have an average of 85 and no grade lower than 72. 
Seniors — 



E. R. Andrew 


1 term 


C. F. Heard 


1 term 


W. S. Clark 


3 terms 


R. B. Jones 


3 terms 


G. E. Dresser 


1 term 


E. 0. Richards 


2 terms 


F. M. Falconer 


1 term 


R. H. Smithwick 


3 terms 


J. W. Fletcher 


3 terms 






Upper Middlers — 








P. N. Anderson 


1 term 


M. F. Norwood 


1 term 


L D. Baker 


1 term 


G. E. Olmstead 


1 term 


F. B. Briggs 


1 term 


J. M. Phillips 


2 terms 


N. Dodd 


1 term 


L. N. Seymour 


1 term 


N. T. Lane 


3 terms 


D. C. Starr 


1 term 


P. B. Lord 


3 terms 






Lower Middlers — 








B. HaskeU, Jr. 


2 terms 


W. N. Webster 


2 terms 


R. Martin 


2 terms 


J. G. Winchester 


2 terms 


W. D. Scott 


1 term 






Juniors — 








R. M. Clough 


3 terms 


C. S. Lunt, Jr. 


3 terms 


P. C. Daniels 


3 terms 


D. M. Pattison 


1 term 


E. F. Hatch 


1 term 


H. S. Pole, 2d 


1 term 


A. C. Ledyard 


1 term 


R. H. Sears 


2 terms 



61 



SENIOR HONORS 
Class of 1917 



William Smith Clark 
Thurston Pond Blodget 



Alvin Frederick Cohen 



James Warren Fletcher 



William Smith Clark 
Alvin Frederick Cohen 
Carlton Farrar Heard 



Bible 

Alvin Frederick Cohen 

Chemistry 

James Warner Fletcher 
Roderick Bissell Jones 
English 

James Sayre Pickering 
Raymond Thomas Rich 

French, Elementary 

Henry Russell Murphy 
Willard Bates Purington 
French, Advanced 

James Sayre Pickering 
Raymond Thomas Rich 
Edgar Ott Richards 
John Alden Van Campen 

German, Elementary 
Willard Bates Purinton 
Edgar Ott Richards 

German Advanced, 
Henry Russell Murphy 

Greek, Elementary 
Carlton Farrar Heard 
Harmony 

Arthur Ward Spence 
History, American 

Edgar Ott Richards 
History, English 
Ferris Baldwin Briggs 
Latin 

Raymond Thomas Rich 
Latin Composition 
Raymond Thomas Rich 
Mathematics, Advanced Algebra 

George Eaton Dresser 
Mathematics, Solid Geometry 

Reginald Hammerick Smithwick 
Mechanical Drawing 

Paul Howard Crane 
Mansfield Allen Lyon 
Physics 

James Warner Fletcher Roderick Bissell Jones 

Theodore Chase Greene Willard Bates Purinton 



Roderick Bissell Jones 
Frank Miller Falconer 



Alvin Frederick Cohen 



Frank Wale Norton 
Donald Fell Carpenter 



62 



Spanish 
Alvin Frederick Cohen 



Cum Laude 



Earl Raymond Andrew 
William Smith Clark 



Carlton Farrar Heard 
Roderick Bissell Jones 
Willard Bates Purinton 



Alvin Frederick Cohen 
George Eaton Dresser 
James Warner Fletcher 



Raymond Thomas Rich 
Edgar Ott Richards 



Reginald Hammerick Smithwick 



These members of the class of 1917 were elected to membership in the Cum 
Laude Society on the basis of their superior scholarship in all subjects for their 
Senior year. 

This society aims to bestow that recognition upon high scholarship in the 
preparatory schools which the Phi Beta Kappa Society gives to it in the colleges. 



63 



CLASS OF 1917 



The following students, members of the class of 1917 unless otherwise in- 
dicated, have entered college. 

Amherst — Martin Buell Beardslee, William Smith Clark, David Phillips 
Hatch, Jr. (1918), Curtis Rose Hatheway, Jr. (1918), Carlton Farrar Heard, 
Raymond Thomas Rich. 

Brown — Russell Harris Greene, Daniel Rogers Pinkham, Howard Bucknell 
Stearns, Preston Tapley Stephenson. 

Columbia — Frank Harrison Dowd, James Sayre Pickering. 

Cornell — Earl Raymond Andrew, Harry Wilbur Barnes, Frank Miller 
Falconer, John Alden Van Campen. 

Dartmouth — Owen Carlisle Frost, Edgar Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Wale 
Norton, Howard Holton Noyes (1918), William Porter Shurtleff (ex-1918), 
Newell Couch Smith, Alexander Thomson (ex-1917), Roger Conant Wilde 
(1918). 

Harvard — George Storer Baldwin, Jr., Elmer Reese Beeler, Myron Irving 
Borg, Jr. (ex-1917), Richard Simpson Bushnell (1916), James Henry Eaton, 
Leslie Evers, Theodore Chase Greene, Powers Hapgood, Raymond Daniel 
Hart, Sumner Alwyn Hirsch, Henry Arnold Houghton, John Raymond Kelley, 
William Bosworth Martin, Charles Chase Page, Anthony Andrew Piazza, 
Edgar Ott Richards, John Osmon Stubbs, Frederick Allen Thompson, Emery 
Johnstone Trott (1918), Isadore Lewis Westerman. 

University of Maine — George Laurence Blodget. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Paul Nathaniel Anderson, 
(ex-1918), Ethan Allen Beer, Lucian Willis Bugbee, Jr., Donald Fell Car- 
penter, Fred Russell Eugene Dean, Jr., Winter Dean, Alexander Duer Har- 
vey, Robert Kennedy, Henry Russell Murphy, Chester Raymond Painter, 
Reginald Hammerick Smithwick, Edwin Theodore Steffian, Douglas Salcido 
Weatherston (1918), George Brown Wetherbee. 

University of Michigan — Watts Francis Linderman. 

University of Pennsylvania — Luis Zork (1918). 

Princeton — William Bolton, Jr., Arthur Paul Davis, Charles Harold Helli- 
well, Samuel Browning Irwin (1918), Robert Murdoch Miller, Myron Lewis 
Schafer. 



64 



Syracuse University — George Washington Allen. 
Throop College of Technology — Arthur Ward Spence. 
Tufts — Paul Francis Devine. 

W illiams — Elbridge Adams, 2d, Henry Mandeville Ufford (ex-1917). 

Yale College — Thurston Pond Blodget, Charles Harvey Bradley, Jr., 
Alvin Frederick Cohen, Harlan Wooster Cooley, Donald Corprew Dines, 
Stephen Young Hord, Richard Withington Howe, Roderick Bissell Jones, 
Edward MacDonald King, Humphrey Lloyd, Richard Adamson Lumpkin, 
Rolph Thayer Marsh, Raymond Barnard Miles, Thomas Ward O'Connell, 
Raymond Downing Piercy, Harold Hunter Schaff, Robert Fitch Shedden r 
Donald Winnifield Smith, Robert Ten Broeck Stevens, Foster Cormier Y awger 
(1918). 

Sheffield Scientific School — Treat Payne Andrew, Wallace Norton Bar- 
ker, Dexter Drake Coffin (1918), Morris Rosenbaum Glaser, Mansfield Allen 
Lyon, Rodney Halstead Mills, Raymond Bowen Munger, William Dean 
Robinson, Peter Boyd Rutherford (1918), Henry Munger Simmons, Paul 
Emery Thurlow (ex-1918), Donald Case Townley, Robert Hall Warren. 



65 



STUDENTS 

CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT 



CLASS I — SENIORS 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Alexander, John, Jr. 


Aurora, III. 


Bishop 6 


Allen, Ned Bliss 


Carbondale, III. 


Pemberton 5 


Ault, Bromwell 


Wyoming, Ohio 


Miss Cheever's 


Austin, Arthur Everett, Jr. 


Boston 


Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


Bates, Robert Chapman 


Bay Shore, L. L, N. 


Y. Abbot 6 


Bennett, James Galbraith 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet 1 


Bovaird, George Crary 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 20 


Bricken, Carl Ernest 


Shelby ville, Ky. 


Phillips 20 


Brown, Daniel Fisher 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Day 31 


Brown, John Fiske 


Plymouth 


Eaton 6 


Brown, Paul 


Portland, Me. 


Miss Cheever's 


Brown, Robert Alexander, Jr. 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 23 


Cameron, Donald Fiske 


Lowell 


Day 13 


Cameron, Donald Kenzie 


Andover 


30 Salem St. 


Carleton, John Porter 


Hanover, N. H. 


Adams 21 


Chute, Richard 


Boston 


Taylor 19 


Coakley, John 


Brookline 


Bishop 16 


Coggeshall, John 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 4 


Cragin, Donald 


Worcester 


Day 11 


Crosby, x'Ubert Hastings 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet 1 


Davis, Walter Edward 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Taylor 2 


DeCamp, James Milton 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Day 23 


Dickinson, Porter Stevens 


Lunenburg 


Bartlet 7 


Dodge, Horace Holbrook 


Andover 


68 Park St. 


Eckfeldt, Edward Hooper, Jr. 


Orange, N. J. 


Bartlet 16 


Frank, Harry, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


Frenkeh Sidney Adolph 


El Paso, Texas 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Fullerton, George Jackson, Jr. 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Day 10 


Goodwin, Henry Murray 


Portland, Me. 


Phillips 18 


Gratwick, Mitchell 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Pemberton 6 


Greene, David Lyman 


Upper Montclair, N. J. Eaton 2 



66 



NAMES 



RESIDENCES 



ROOMS 



Griffin, Charles Carroll 
Haring, Harry Albert, Jr. 
Horn, Fraser Macpherson 
Home, Herbert Quimby 
Houseman, Maurice Henry 
Humphrey, Herbert, Jr. 
Jones, Sewall Arthur 
Kaltenbach, Henry Julius, Jr. 
Keefe, Joseph Choate 
Kellogg, Baucus Cronkhite 
Kent, Alfred Thomas 
Kinney, Thomas Wylie 
Lane, Nathaniel Tyler, Jr. 
Leith, Eaton 
Lewis, Richmond 
Lord, Philip Barker 
Lunt, Thomas Egery 
McChesney, Lindsley 
MacCready, William Beattie 
MacDonald, Lowell 
Mcllwain, George Irwin 
McKinstry, Willard Lawyer 
MacMillan, Cargill 
Marshall, Gordon Preston 
Marshall, Howard Walker 
Meyer, John Philip 
Miller, Spencer Hotchkiss 
Mills, William Elligood, Jr. 
Miner, John Arthur Dickinson 
Moody, Robert Earle 
Moore, Paul Frederick 
Moorehead, Singleton Peabody 
Murdock, Bennet Bronson 
Neiley, Edward Abbott 
Neiley, Stephen Barton 
Neville, Louis Gregg, Jr. 
Nichols, Stewart 
Norwood, John Kendall 



Champaign, III, 


Clement 6 


Massillon, Ohio 


Day 1 


Vandergrift, Pa. 


Mrs. Dole's 


Bradford 


Taylor 15 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Mr. McCurdy s 


Marblehead 


Day 10 


Andover 


56 High St. 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


% Taylor 16 


New London, Conn. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Glens Falls, N. Y. 


Adams 23 


Brockton 


Adams z4 


New Haven, Conn. 


Phillips 18 


bt. Louis, Mo. 


Bartlet 11 


Lancaster, N ■ H. 


Draper 5 


S pringfi eld 


Andover 9 




T,awrpnpp 

Xjtl VY 1 C 1 1 V- 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Phillips 12 


Troy, N. Y. 


Day 15 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 10 


Bar Harbor, Me. 


Day 5 


Cambridge 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Watertown, N . Y . 


Day 18 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet 10 


Newtonville 


Bishop 21 


Newtonville 


Pease House 9 


St. Louis Mo. 


Mr. Allen's 


Meriden Conn. 


Phillips 4 


Waitsfield, Vt. 


Adams 22 




Bishon 21 


fin 1 1 nTfl vn Ip 


Tifi UprH vji If* 

1 f<X 1\.<X i KA. V dlVy 


W atertown, N . Y . 


Day 17 


A ndover 


Bartlet 25 


Meriden Conn. 


Andover 6 


Winchester 


l ayior i i 


Winchester 


Taylor 11 


Wellesley Hills 


Day 35 


Elkhart, Ind. 


Bishop 11 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 



f>7 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Norwood, Merrill Francis 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Page, Robert Guthrie 


Madison, Wis. 


Phillips 7 


Paine, George Lyman, Jr. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Day 27 


Paxton, John Hall 


Chinkiang, China 


Phillips 17 


Pearson, James Kendal 


Greenwich, Conn. 


Pemberton 3 


Peters, Edward Wells 


Haverhill 


Day 21 


Phillips, John Manning 


Andover 


Phillips 15 


Rawson, Edward Sidney 


Glens Falls, N. Y. 


Taylor 4 


Robinson, Charles Alexander, Jr. 


Peekskill, N. Y. 


Eaton 4 


Rose, George Childs 


Ellenville, N. Y. 


Taylor 7 


Rosenberg, Emanuel Jerome 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 18 


Rutherfurd, Douglas 


Vernon, N. J. 


Bishop 24 


Scamman, Albert Fremont 


Phillips, Me. 


Abbot 17 


Schauffler, Harry Klock 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Bartlet 12 


Scheide, Edward Cutter 


Hartford, Conn. 


Day 8 


Seymour, Leonard North 


Elgin, Neb. 


Bartlet 7 


Smith, Adrian Warren 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Pemberton 9 


Smith, Frederick Merwin, Jr. 


South Hadley Falls 


Phillips 1 


Smith, George Van Siclen 


Richmond Hill, L. N. Y. Bartlet 3 


Sprague, Morrill Goodwin 


Harvard 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Starr, Donald Carter 


Winchester 


Bartlet 20 


Stearns, John Frye 


Concord, N. H. 


Day 3 


Stearns, Philip Morris 


Andover 


41 School St. 


Stevenson, William Edwards 


Princeton, N. J. 


Bartlet 8 


Thornton, George Abram 


Bedford, Ind. 


Bartlet 2 


Tison, Alexander, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 16 


Townsend, Frederic de Peyster, Jr. 


Cooperstown, N. Y. 


Bartlet 26 


Vaillant, George Clapp 


Boston 


Bartlet 26 


Walton, Harold Wendover 


Louisville, Ky. 


Mr. Brown's 


Weber, Harold Irving 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


Abbot 11 


Wheeler, John Walker, Jr. 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Williams, William Didymus 


London, Ohio 


Miss Cheever's 


Wilson, John Chapman 


Trenton, N. J. 


Phillips 12 


Woolley, Roger Mirick 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Phillips 13 


Works, John Booth, Jr. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Mr. McCurdy's 



Seniors — 104 



68 



CLASS II 


-UPPER MIDDLERS 


NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Atterbury, John Reynolds 


Chicago, III. 


Day 33 


r>eais, Hitnan Aiirea 


Lowell 


Miss Park's 


Benjamin, John Davidson 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Bickford, Franklin Armand 


Worcester 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Borman, John William 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 3 


Bovey, Miartin Koon 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet 16 


Breed, Richard Phillips 


Lynn 


Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


Brow 11, Harvey Templeton 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Day 16 


Brownson, Alfred Gardner 


Springfield 


Taylor 18 


Buck, Jerome Campbell 


Elmira, N. Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


Christensen, Harold Edward 


Wobum 


Bishop 22 


Puffin T? Q -1 T^uoll 


New Bedford 


Clement 13 


Conant, Hurst W aterman 


Portland, Me. 


Miss Cheever's 


Cummings, Edwin Hunt, Jr. 


North Attleboro 


Bishop 33 


Cushman, W illiam ^Michael 


Washington, D. C. 


Day 21 


Davis, Ferduiand Hermann 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 18 


Davis, John TCirhy 


Brakpan, So. Africa 


Bishop 27 


Davis, Leslie David Newell 


East Norwalk, Conn. 


Bishop 3 


Day, Huntington Xownsend 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 8 


Dodson, Curtis Harvie 


Danville, Va. 


Draper 1 


Dole, Charles Minot 


Andover 


34 Phillips St. 


Dow, James Kimball 


North Andover 


Bishop 19 


Eddy, Caleb Francis 


Wellesley Hills 


Bartlet 27 


Edwards, Jonathan W alter 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 28 


Esty, John Cushing 


Bethlehem, Pa. 


Day 2 


Flather, Frederick 


Lowell 


Day 4 


Flather, John Rogers 


Lowell 


Day 4 


Fletcher, Morton Woodbury 


Andover 


41 Salem St. 


Foote, Ray Palmer 


Englewood, N. J. 


Phillips Inn 


Fuller, Charles Pelham Greenough White Plains, N. Y. 


Bartlet 25 


Gibson, George Brunner 


Evanston, III. 


Mr. Allen's 


Gordon, John Stuart 


Hazardville, Conn. 


Bartlet 13 


Graham, Thomas 


Fargo, N. D. 


Mr. Brown's 


Green, Thomas Dudley 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 17 


Hall, William Augustus 


Wakefield 


Clement 4 


Hartshorne. Richard 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 23 


Higgins, Freeman 


Boston 


Farrar 6 


Hill, Herbert Wells 


Andover 


36 Salem St. 


Hyde, Bruce Porter 


West Haven, Conn. 


Mrs. Gardner's 



69 



■ NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Jones, Walter Leland 


Newton Centre 


Adams 15 


Kane, Arthur Sharrard 


Pelham Manor, N . Y. 


.oancroiL la 


"K"^itVi A llf n 


iy vw i uric, it . / . 


Adams 16 


JVCIlIlcClj , tlOUIl XjUVVrtrU 


Jamaica Plain 


Tucker 3 


ivimDan, xnuip n<awin 


Bradford 


Adams 5 


Krause, George Hasbrouck 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 






i>irs. j. ri. v^iarK s 


Leland, Ldmund rTancis, Jr. 


tfrookline 


lavior si 


, iJUliiK iVlct Lilian, dr. 


~Pnril n*nr\ \f £> 
L Urt/lilfVil, t . 


itxias v^iicc vtrr » 


IManning, Birdsall Thomas 


Cnrrnpl N V 

i^armei, iy . i . 


ivirs. xioit s 


Marshall, Harry Reinhard 


rr Vol HULL 11, KsUllfl. 


PViillina 18 


v 1 o v t i ti T? r» nf»T*t' 

±J±Cil till, liUUCl L 


l/i TT) /it") fl no 

K/U ffiur myt> 


DanieL i / 


M^ayers, Bertram Francis 


Lawrence, L. I., N. Y. 


Andover 1 


Axok, Hing Sung 


Hong Kong, China 


Clement 7 


M^organ, W illiam Leverette, Jr. 


Newark, N.J. 


Disnop %o 


"V'Ttlll^Tl T/"\C£*T\V| "V^1T"fTlTllllC 

iviuiicii, uuscljii y iigimus 


Houston, Texas 


Bancroft 3 


Newkirk, Frank Kenneth 


rr urLtolVr 


Andover 4 


v^Alcj , XVdU'-im.t; lVlUIStr 


Reading 


Disnop oz 


Qumn, John William 


Boston 


j. ucKer o 


Read, John Miner 


Swampscott 


ijisnop i* 


Sawyer, George Ffrost 


A ndover 


Dartiet x» 


Scammon, George Richard 


EiXeier, i\ . ti . 


M^iss Hinchcliffe s 


Schaul, Henry Herschel, Jr. 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Mrs. Wain wright's 


Qr>ntt Walter Tloirirl 

ocoti, vv alter ua via 


Lincoln, N . H. 


Dartiei l / 


Serven, James Edsall 


reari tiiver, i\ . i . 


Bancroft 9 


Smith, Whitney Savage 


Concord 


Adams 17 


Spear, James Nathaniel 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Miss Cheever s 


Spencer, Frederick Lionel 


Tlnnhln'n/1 T>n<rh 111 

nigniana earn, in. 


Bancroft 9 


Stevens, Nathaniel, 2d 


riamjieia, i\. J. 


uartiet z^i 


Straut, Charles Barnwell 


aujj em, i\ . i . 


r>isnop ohi 


Tierney, Richard William, Jr. 


t ail ttiver 


uay oo 


Webb, Charles Grosvenor 


JVellsboro, Pa. 


ADDOl l 


Whipple, Oliver Mayhew 


New Haven, Conn. 


Bartlet 18 


W iley, Lawrence W hittemore 


Seattle, Wash. 


Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


W illiams, James Baker 


Glastonbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 12 


Wilson, Edward Converse 


Gloucester 


Phillips 6 




Gloucester 


Phillips 6 


^^inchester, John Gordon 


Cold Spring Harbor, L 


. /., N. Y. 






Phillips 17 


Winkler, Robert Eli 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Bishop 2 


Wolfe, Grafton 


Omaha, Neb. 


Mr. Blanchard's 



Upper Middlers — 78 
70 



CLASS III — LOWER MIDDLERS 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Allaben, Marshall Champion, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Bishop 13 


Anderson, Harold Homer 


Norfolk, Neb. 


Phillips 9 


Anderson, John Morrissey Paul 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Bancroft 10 


Bacigalupo, John Lewis 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Bartlett, Calvin Page 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


Bancroft 11 


Bent, Dana Parker 


Reading 


Clement 3 


Boulton, Wolfrid Rudyerd, Jr. 


Beaver, Pa. 


Adams 4 


Braden, George Dewey 


Washington, Pa. 


Abbot 16 


Bruce, Donald Wainwright 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Callahan, George Fred 


Holyoke 


Draper 3 


Coleman, John Guion 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 9 


Daniels, Paul Clement 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Churchill 4 


Dole, Alexander Watters 


Bangor, Me. 


Adams 2 


Dowling, Franklin Woodbury 


Dedham 


Taylor 26 


D'Wolf, James Francis 


Bristol, R. I. 


Farrar 4 


Emerson, Maxwell 


Newton Centre 


Churchill 3 


Eudy, Harrison 


Louisville, Ky. 


Phillips 8 


Frost, Malcolm Hovenden 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Frue, William Calhoun 


Waban 


Mr. Brown's 


Hammond, Luther Salem, Jr. 


Winnetka, III. 


Bishop 10 


Haviland, Roger Brush 


Gloversville, N. Y. 


Day 22 


Hilditch, Alan Audley 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 3 


Hills, Edward Hamilton 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bishop 8 


Johnson, Albert Lincoln, Jr. 


Hamburg, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Jones, Edwin Francis 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 12 


Kingman, Joseph Ramsdell, Jr. 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Taylor 2 


Kurth, William Waters 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Learned, William Hallam 


Watertown, N. Y. 


Hardy 1 


Ledyard, Augustus Canfield 


Detroit, Mich. 


Tucker 1 


Ledyard, Henry, Jr. 


Detroit, Mich. 


Tucker 1 


Little, Charles Joseph 


Evanston, 111. 


Woods 5 


Lunt, Clarence Sumner, Jr. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Phillips 22 


Macdonald, Allan Houston 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


McMahan, Horace Ford 


New York, N. Y. 


Phillips 17 


Matson, Ernest Augustus 


Wobum 


Bancroft 17 


Morse, Daniel Stuart 


Lexington, Ky. 


Adams 3 


Osgood, Robert Ward, Jr. 


Salem 


Bishop 20 


Otis, Raymond 


Chicago, III. 


Bartlet 29 


Paine, Alfred White 


New Haven, Conn. 


Day 27 


Parkhurst, Leonard Woods 


Wilkes Barre, Pa. 


Bancroft 4 



71 



NAMES 


RESIDENC ES 


ROOMS 


Peckett, Robert Plympton, Jr. 


Franconia, N. H. 


r>artlet 13 


Plummer, Howard Stephens 


Till 

M aroleneaa 


Day 28 


Jroie, jienry otier, za 


Hot Springs, Vol. 


Day 29 


Robinson, Willard Marshall Law 


Lambriage, jy . i . 


Adams 2 


Sears, Richard Harvey 


Cambridge 


Bartlet 14 


bnepard, htuart 


Brookline 


Clement 8 


Sircom, Arthur Rowland 


Maiden 


Bishop 25 


teller, William Jtvicnard, Jr. 


• J - T T XT V 

oaysiae, L. 1., N . Jr. 


Mrs. J. H. Clark s 


Tyler, Morris 


New Haven, Conn. 


Abbot o 


Wasserman, Howard 


rhxiaaelphxa, Pa. 


Andover 1 


Wells, George Burnham 


Southbridge 


i > is nop do 


Wheelock, Frederic Melvin 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Whitelock, Otto von Stockhausen 


New York, N. Y. 


Tucker 5 


Lower Middlers — 53 




CLASS IV— JUNIORS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 




Abbe, Charles Kittredge 


Dublin, N. H. 


Element 12 


Allen, Daniel 


Andover 


oo rsartiet ot. 


Allen, Robert Gray 


North Reading 


Joancroft 11 


Annis, Perley Mason 


Stoneham 


ivir. ivicv^uTay s 


Atha, Henry George 


Groton, Conn. 


Adams 22 


Avery, Daniel Dudley 


Aurora, N. Y. 


msnop y 


Black, George Kelleher 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Bond, Joseph Arthur 


Reading 


Bishop 14 


Booth, W Gordon 


Bradford 


TJl •II' -1 

Phillips 1 


Brazer, Richard Bird 


Newton Centre 


wuuams xiau 


Bremer, Henry Frank, Jr. 


Roland Park, Md. 


Mr. Brown's 


Bricken, Fay Erskine 


Shelbyville, Ky. 


DL "II" /ja 

rhillips 20 


Brown, William Henry 


Langhorne, Pa. 


Adams lz 


Bruce, Herbert Thayer 


Brookline 


Adams 10 


Burns, James Ferguson 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 


Adams 7 


Butler, Richard Albert 


Brookline 


Williams Hall 


Carter, Kenneth Cranston 


Chicago, III. 


JtJisnop x 


Clark, Alexander Bierce, Jr. 


Canton, Ohio 


cnurcnui x 


Clyde, George Albert, Jr. 


Rome, N. Y. 


Mr. Allen's 


Cornell, Joseph I 


Nyack, N. Y. 


Pease House 11 


Cutler, Howard McKeen 


Andover 


9 Abbot St. 



NAMES RESIDENCES ROOMS 



Danforth, George Henry, 3d 


Summit, N. J. 


Farrar 4 


Dean, rerry loles 


Troy, N. Y. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Diaz, Oscar Edward 


Guatemala City, Guatemala Bishop 31 


Dickson, Richard Malcolm 


Holyoke 


-Ciaton o 


uurant, Jonn 


Npin Yfvrlf N V 
iv ew I OTK, i>./. 


TVTr T*£»<»t'a 
1YU . Iccl 3 


u won, nenry i^reyer 


nristoi, Ix. 1. 


WIHiamo TT,. 1 1 

Williams nan 


Dwyer, John Francis, Jr. 


{jeneva, iv . i . 


TVTt> T*»c»+ ' a 

i.V_LT. IT CCt 3 


Dwyer, Wilfred Martin 


Geneva, N. Y. 


AT*. *Po£kT ' a 

ivir. reel s 


H-arly, nobart HiVans 


Medford 


xayior o 


Jt/aton, Jtvicnara tvQwiij 


Beverly 


Andover 3 


Emery, Willard, Jr. 


i opsjieia 


vv miams nan 


Emmert, Juhus Frank 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


JbiVans, r miip Owuym 


Cam bridge 


Mass Carter s 


rauon, josepn XiClwara, jr. 


Andover 


Missionary Lane 


Ferguson, Oliver Drayton 


Paducah, Ky. 


V\7illiomo TT 1 1 

wuuams nan 


Ferguson, Robert Robertson 


Paducah, Ky. 


Abbot 5 


finaley, rrank Miller 


Boston 


Williams Hall 


Foley, Francis Joseph 


New York, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


rosier, xvooert vv 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Churchill 2 


rronocK, rticnara ilanaail 


Camden, Me. 


Clement 9 


Gage, Charles Stafford 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams Hall 


Graham, John Sidney 


Narragansett Pier, R. I. Mr. Peet's 


Grant, Alexander Lamb 


Andover 


6 Chestnut St. 


Hamilton, John Gordon 


Great Neck Station, L. 


7., N. Y. Day 29 


nayes, rJartiett naraing, jr. 


Andover 


Williams Hall 


Heald, Weldon Fairbanks 


Milford, N. H. 


Taylor 18 


xieaiy, xlunman matt 


Fort Dodge, la. 


Mr. A. G. Clark's 


Henderson, Stanley Day 


Ward Hill 


Ward Hill 


Henke, Carl Harry 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Draper 2 


Herrick, Shailer Archer 


Brattleboro, Vt. 


Day 28 


nibbard, -Frederick William 


Laurence 


Lawrence 


niu, jonn ii/uwara 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Williams Hall 


Hitchcock, William Alvan, 3d 


Boston 


Williams Hall 


xiuDDara, vrubert 


Newton Centre 


Abbot 13 


xiunt, Aiirea xierbert, Jr. 


Colorado Springs, Colo. Draper 6 


Huntley, Sydney Rawson 


New York, N. Y. 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Johns, Jonn 


Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 


Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


Johnson, Thomas 


Winthrop 


Farrar 6 


Jones, David Calhoun 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Williams Hall 


Karnheim, Charles Frederick 


West Newton 


Williams Hall 


Keith, Glen William 


Chelsea, Okla. 


Bancroft 7 


♦Deceased 







73 



NAMES 


i\ jjj o i lj lj l\ \ fjo 


ROOMS 


Kohler, John Michael 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


lucker z 


Isomer, waiter J, Jr. 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Williams Mali 


Lambert, Edward Wilberforce 


Manchester, N . H. 


w uiiams xiau 


Lane, Frederick Henry 


New Haven, Conn. 


uisnop o 


Leffingwell, Henry Dodge 


Montclair, IS . J . 


Element 16 


Liang, Pei Yin 


Changsha, China 


iaylor tt 


McGregor, Gordon 


Haver hill 


Adams 14 


Mclnnes, Duncan 


Bath, Me. 


Miss Carter's 


Magee, Gerald Wilson 


Marbtehead 


Banc rot t 7 


Marks, Kenneth Weale 


Elmira, N. Y. 


V/Uurcniu o 


Martin, Maurice William 


Duluth, Minn. 


Mr. Chandler's 


Mayers, Herbert Francis Lewis Drayton 






King George, Va. 


Day 28 


Miller, George Fillmore, Jr. 


Provincetown 


Abbot 14 


Miller, Gordon Blair 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Mr. Brown's 


Mills, Grant Brickett 


Reading 


Churchill 3 


Moon, James Southworth 


Cranford, N. J. 


Mr. Peet's 


Morrison, Clarence Edwin, Jr. 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Morse, Alfred Hudson 


Edgewood, R. I. Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


Newcombe, James Pratt 


Hibbing, Minn. 


Tucker 4 


Onthank, Pierce 


Fitchburg 


Williams Hall 


Tl 1 T?ll* xx XT 1 

Park, Elliott Norwood 


Cranford, N. J. 


Mr. Peet's 


Peck, George Morris 


West Haven, Conn. 


Adams 15 


T% T* 111 TT' 1 i 

Perry, Randolph Hight 


Andover 


70 Elm St. 


Poor, William Bunker 


North Bridgton, Me. 


Taylor 24 


Power, Elliot Evans 


New York, N. Y. 


9 Chestnut St. 


Reach, Charles Dallas 


Freeport, L. I., N. Y. 


Mr. Allen's 


Read, Harry Augustus Sherman, Jr. 


Andover 


11 Locke St. 


Reeside, Alan Edson 


Washington, D. C. 


Mr. Blanchard's 


Richards, Francis Bullard, 2d 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Pemberton 2 


Richardson, Thomas Peter deQuartel 


Germantown, Pa. 


Farrar 5 


Rosenberg, Sidney Isaac Myer 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 5 


Ross, Hiram Goodrich 


Sioux Falls, S. D. 


Taylor 13 


Sahler, Carl Philip 


Harlingen, N . J. 


Eaton 2 


Sanborn, John Webster 


Andover 


5 Locke St. 


Schotte, Barthold Kuno 


Amsterdam, N. Y. 


Abbot 11 


Schumaker, Albert Gailey 


Waterbnry, Conn. 


Williams Hall 


Shapleigh, David Miller 


West Lebanon, Me. 


Adams 10 


Sharretts, Thaddeus Stevens, Jr. 


Plainfield, N. J. 


Woods 6 


Small, Joseph Thomas 


Bath, Me. 


Miss Carter's 



74 



NAM BIS 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


smith, Carleton Goodyear 


New Haven, Conn. 


Mr. McCurdy's 


smith, Dudley lenney 


Montclair, J\ . J . 


v> imams Hail 


Spencer, Gerard 


n^.i-,.41, if,',, „ 
Lfulutn, Minn. 


Air. Chandler's 


Stearns, Charles Deane 


A ndover 


o i^napei Ave. 


O i _ T 

Stevenson, Laurence 


rlainjiela, iv. «/. 


Draper 6 


stillman, Ldgar Lhapman 


T-««. AT V 

i ro?/, iv . / . 


VI oods / 


btolz, Kichard rallis 


Dayton, Ohio 


Pease House 12 


Strazdas, Peter 


Lawrence 


Clement 9 


Sullivan, George Albert 




Farrar 3 


w" 4- T) ,1 fTVI 

Sweet, Kaymond Ihorn 


Wuliamsport, ra. 


Bancroft 17 


Temple, George Price 


A ndover 


zzo Jtligniand rioaa 


lhomas, Albert Lox, Jr. 


T7* 7 

r oxooro 


V> Uliams riail 


Trasel, Edward George, Jr. 


rnilaaelpnia, ra. 


w t : 1 1 • TT„ 11 

vv uliams xiaii 


luttle, Lewis iJuckland 


W ateroury, Conn. 


Abbot 18 


Van Wyck, George Lee 


Belmont 


\) * ,1. £JO 

rfisnop z8 


\ oorhees, Sherman Persons 


pi—V— xt v 
iLlmira, £V. I . 


Adams 8 


V> ade, V\ indsor rSurt 


^4 ndover 


oz fealem St. 


VV lght, Daniel Lwmg 


St. Louis, Mo. 


t>i_ :n • it 

rhilhps 11 


Willard, Henry Augustus, 2d 


W ashington, u. C. 


T3 ! -.1, ^ _ & A 

oisnop x4 


W 1 1 c n To m £>c Tr\V»n 


si IfloltyrUUlll, 1\ . I . 




Yardley, Frederick William 


East Orange, N. J. 


Williams Hall 


Young, Wilbur Fenelon, Jr. 


Springfield 


Bishop 10 



Juniors — 123 



75 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT 



CLASS A — SENIORS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Abbott, Samuel Batehelder 


North Reading 


North Reading 


Angier, Otis Clapp 


Framingham 


Day 23 


Bailey, Clayton Eddy, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 36 


Baker, Caldwell 


Springfield 


Bishop 10 


Baker, Leland Dyer 


Provincetown 


Abbot 8 


Bodine, Marc Williams 


Wellsboro, Pa. 


Abbot 7 


Bogert, Albert Curtis 


Oradell, N. J. 


Day 14 


Bolton, Kenneth Boxley 


Troy, N. Y. 


Mrs. Holt's 


Brewster, William Rollins 


Andover 


8 Judson Road 


Briggs, Ferris Baldwin 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bartlet 30 


Callanan, Cornelius Richard 


Keeseville, N. Y. 


Churchill 6 


Chadbourn, Reuben Cornwall 


Columbus, Wis. 


Bishop 26 


Chase, Abbott 


Andover 


94 Summer St. 


Chittick, Charles Yardley 


Newark, N.J. 


Taylor 1 


Coburn, Daniel Erwin 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Cole, Hobart Fairchild 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Phillips 10 


Dodd, Norman 


South Orange, N. J. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


English, Eugene Schuyler 


Merion, Pa. 


Bartlet 20 


Failey, Crawford Fairbanks 


Terre Haute, Ind. 


Phillips 3 


Fairbairn, John Kitchener 


Joliet, III. 


Draper 1 


Ferguson, Arthur 


Evanston, III. 


Miss Park's 


Gray, William, Jr. 


Amesbury 


Day 25 


Hamer, George Frederick, Jr. 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Haskell, Broderick, Jr. 


Franklin, Pa. 


Bartlet 18 


Higley, Walter Maydole 


Norwich, N. Y. 


Day 2 


XT 11 "TT* 1 1 T rt» 

Howell, Kimbark Jeffrey 


New London, Conn. 


Mx. Johnson's 


Hussey, Edward John 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


James, William Howard Longwell 


Oil City, Pa. 


Adams 11 


Johnston, John Walter, 2d 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 9 


Kahn, Edgar Adolph 


Detroit, Mich. 


Adams 1 


Kennedy, James Harrington, Jr. 


Methuen 


Abbot 9 


Klopfer, Donald 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 5 


Leach, Walter Leavenworth 


Middletown, Conn. 


Pemberton 3 


Liang, Ting Kai 


Hong Kong, China 


Taylor 28 



76 



NAMES 


H .LblD JENC iCH 




Libby, Scott Dickson 


South Hamilton 


Adams 4 


McColley, Earl Stanley 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


"» K T~\ 1 1 XT 1 T> i 

MacDonald, Howard Brenton 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Bishop 17 


McFarland, Julian Bonsall 


TTT ■ /"> 7 • T\ 

West Chester, Pa. 


Eaton 3 


May, Ernest Nugent 


Boise, Ida. 


Day 14 


Meagher, Richard Hayes 


Chicago, III. 


Day 32 


Morgan, Francis Ring 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Noyes, William Henry 


Mystic, Conn. 


Taylor 6 


Olmstead, George Edward 


West Brookfield 


Bartlet 9 


Ti * TY1 *1* "**"*■ 1 n 

Ferrin, Philip Mitchell 


Stoughton 


Miss Cheever's 


Purinton, Willard Bates 


Augusta, Me. 


Andover 9 


TT> 111 1 * "» JT ■ 

Randolph, Robert Montgomery 


Rahway, N. J. 


Bancroft 18 


Roberson, William Carter 


New York, N. Y. 


Phillips 13 


Robinson, Nathaniel Oliver 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bishop 4 


Rose, James Harry 


Canton, Ohio 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Russel, Albert Lacy 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


Clement 2 


Sharp, Edward Leslie 


Chicago, III. 


Miss Park's 


Shirley, William Wayne 


Franklin, N. H. 


Day 3 


O • ■ 1 TT t y~i 1 1 

Smith, Howard Caswell 


Swampscott 


Phillips 19 


Smith, James Alexander, Jr. 


Chambersburg, Pa. 


Phillips 2 


Thompson, Mason Leo 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Bartlet 12 


TTT 1 1 TT~V 1 1 nil 

Walch, Donald Elbra 


Providence, R. I. 


Miss Park's 


TT7 T> _ J 

Wason, Raymond 


Brookhne 


Taylor 16 


Winde, Ronald Henry 


Melrose 


Taylor 3 


Wood, Richard Minot 


Baltimore, Md. 


Abbot 15 




Seniors — 59 




CLASS B- 


-UPPER MIDDLERS 


NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Akerley, Elmer Charles 


Reading 


Abbot 4 


Bailey, George Reily 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Bartlet 4 


Bartlett, Jerome 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 35 


Bates, Frederick Woolworth 


Canton, Ohio 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Belt, Fletcher LeRoy 


Toledo, Ohio 


Mrs. Dole's 


Bergstrom, Phillips Barnard 


Andover 


8 Punchard Ave. 


Billings, Asa White Kenney, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 15 


T">* 1 T IT TT 11 T 

Bishop, Leonard Le Valley, Jr. 


Westhampton, Beach, L. I., N. Y. 






Mrs. Gardner's 


Bixby, Wingate 


Haverhill 


Day 31 


Bowles, Raymond Leland 


Springfield 


Pemberton 5 



77 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Brewster, Morgan Horsfall 


Hartford, Conn. 


Bishop 29 


Brown, Edward Dexter 


Rhinelander, Wis. 


Adams 8 


Burnham, Clark James, Jr. 


Berkeley, Cal. 


Day 35 


Caldwell, David Bees 


Omaha, Neb. 


Miss Park's 


Chen, bu bun 


Soochow, China 


Woods 8 


Cheney, Stanley Morse 


CI jl. 7. 'J 

Southbridge 


Bartlet 19 


Clark, Alan Bobbins 


Northampton 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Clement, rranklm Groves 


/~1 7 • Til 

Chicago, III. 


Day 20 


Daugherty, Edward Allison 


r\ i ii i 

Omaha, Neb. 


Miss Park's 


Dudley, Bobert Barker 


Newtonville 


Adams 17 


JJutry, jidward Stephen 


Lawrence 


Bancroft 17 


T1 f 'ft TTT' 1 

Emerson, Lilley Winslow 


East Derry, N. H. 


Abbot 15 


English, Worth 


New Haven, Conn. 


Day 19 


Feeney, Byron Joseph 


Andover 


TT 1 j. Ox 

Holt St. 


inlanders, trankhn Addison 


Winchester 


Bishop 16 


Fletcher, Leonidas, Jr. 


Greenville, Miss. 


Bishop 18 


roster, Seth Bnggs 


O 7 ± J 747 \T 

Schenectady, N . Y . 


Mr. Hopper's 


Fresneda, Antonio Manuel 


Camague, Cuba 


Andover 2 


/"i i TTT'll* TT 1_ l T 

Gates, William Herbert, Jr. 


Worcester 


Phillips 8 


Goss, Parker Sprague 


Melrose 


Bancroft 3 


Gould, Sidney Dean 


jtt * t T 74 T TT 

Free-port, L. I., N. Y. 


Bishop 28 


Gray, Rudolph Isaac 


Alexandria, S. D. 


Andover 6 


TT 1 ■ ■ TT 1 TV' 1 

Hackett, Howard Dickson 


Bolton 


Clement 10 


TT 1 1 1 T>" 

Hale, Edward Bice 


Castine, Me. 


Draper 2 


Hardy, Gelston 


Philadelphia, ra. 


Phillips 21 


Hewett, George Hale 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 


Bartlet 2 


TT 11. 1 T» 1_ j_ t~\ • V ■ 

Holbrook, Bobert Dwight 


Hartford, Conn. 


Bishop 29 


TT 1 1 TP* 1 1 1* 1 

Holden, timothy English 


Danville, III. 


Phillips 14 


TT 1 T_l T' 11 4.1. 

Houk, John lalbott 


Dayton, Ohio 


TT* „ TT 1 f\ 

Pease House 10 


TT i* 1 A 1 1 1 T» i 1 

Hupfel, Adolph Peter Glaser 


74 7 17 7 AT TT" 

ivew F orfc, N. Y. 


Bancroft 6 


T TUT TTl ■ 1 C 1 

James, Warner Rutherford 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Taylor 25 


Kung, Yu Yui Antung 


Shanghai, China 


TT 1 a 

Hardy 4 


-» mr XT' T~V 1 1 TT 

McKee, Donald Hay 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


Andover 6 


TV T Ti /T T\ if TVT • T 

Mann, Morgan MacMornes, Jr. 


Ti 77 H Jf AT \7 

Pelham Manor, N. Y. 


Mr. Blanchard's 


Mann, William Dewey 


Quechee, Vt. 


Adams 21 


May, William rv award 


noise Ida. 


rJancrolt lo 


Mayers, Drayton Borden 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Clement 11 


Meckel, Chester Toussy 


Chicago, III. 


Miss Park's 


Mellor, Duncan McLaren 


Plainfield, N. J. 


Bartlet 30 



78 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Minor, rrederic Wakeneld 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


71 Main St. 


Murray, George Hinds 


Far Rockaway, L. /., N. Y. Day 34 


Netcher, Irving 


Chicago, III. Mrs. J. H. Clark's 


JNewbold, Charles 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 


Pease House 10 


Otis, Stuart Huntington 


Chicago, III. 


Phillips 2 


rarker, Lharles Stewart 


Meriden, Conn. 


Taylor 23 


Perry, Merton Egbert 


A mherst 


Pease House 9 


Poor, Leander Holden 


North Bridgton, Ale. 


Andover 2 


Prendergast. William Augustine 


Brooklyn, N. Y . 


Mr. Aliens 


Richards. Thomas Orin 


Upper Montclair, N . J. 


Pemberton 2 


Richmond, Jbrnest Dalton, Jr. 


Reading 


Abbot 16 


Rumney, Wilford Lawrence 


N augatuck, Conn. 


Day 28 


Sanchez. Carlos Manuel 


Santa Lucia, Cuba 


Day 9 


Smith, Charles Frederic, Jr. 


Swampscott 


Bancroft 10 


Spencer,- Hugh Harding 


Andover 


96 Central St. 


btickney, Alpheus rJeede, zd 


Chattanooga, Tenn. 


HarHv 3 

liaiuy kj 


Stuil, .rniiip r>arton 


Chicago, III. 


Mrs. Dole's 


oulhvan, James raul 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Bishop 26 


lappan, Hernck Ugden 


New York, N. Y. 


\ ] r I | nnntaf a 
1111 . 11UUUC1 3 


Webster, Walter JNeal 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


VVhipp, Harold Jourton 


Fall River 


Bancroft 7 


Wicker, Walter Charles 


Chicago, III. 


Day 27 


XXT' 1 i T 17 J J T 

Wight, Ira Jbdward, Jr. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Phillips 11 


Williams, Franklin Clark 


Fayetteville, N . Y. 


Hardy 5 


Wolstenholme, James Greenhalgh 


Fall River 


Mr. Chandler's 


Woodling, Preston 


Cranford, N. J. 


Mr. Peet's 


Yu, Chi Chuan 


Changsha, China 


Clement 5 



Upper Middlers — 76 



CLASS C- LOWER MIDDLERS 



NAMES 

Abbott, Paul Jewett 
Adams, Francis Fiske 
Anderson, Robert Duncan 
Appel, Rudolph 
Bartow, Nevett Steele, Jr. 
Bates, Theodore Lewis 
Benton, Josiah Holt 
Berger, Sherwood Isbell 
Blodgett, W 7 entworth Putnam 
Bogart, Humphrey deForest 



RESIDENCES 

Andover 
Andover 
Brookline 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
South Orange, N. J. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Belmont 

N augatuck, Conn. 
West Newton 
New York, N. Y. 
79 



ROOMS 

119 Andover St. 
8 Morton St. 
Draper 5 
Adams 22 
Bartlet 9 
Taylor 25 
Bancroft 9 
Mr. Johnson's 
Bancroft 16 
Taylor 5 



NAMES RESIDENCES BOOMS 



xjoj^ci, x\i Liiur xrviiig, «ir. 


Rrnnhhtn W V 
£>TOuKiy7l 9 £S • / • 


ADDOT, IO 


XJrUdCllcj' , VJcUXgc XXdrOlii 


Sin t £>wn 


Mrs. Farlow's 


XJ UoL.ll, X 1 1 tilcl ICiv XXCIlTj 




Adams 15 


K.utt -TnVi n TiYi^t pr 

v_ all, (lUlili X vFoL^-A 


New York N Y 


rVUdlxis if 


Chandler Robert Taft 


WfhrPP,8 f PT 

WW SJt K/C/OV&I 




f^lifi Tim a n PVaTilr "R*iViTi.itiq 


X|n/v>vvOC«vf , 2fJL I*- It • 


udy si 


V^Iltllcj , lYldl V 111 V^lxdpiII 


KJU ULfCl/r Ulyts 


JDartiet i» 


v^oiias, itaipn Qeooiuieri 


Katiscis Cxty 9 A£o, 


Bishop 15 


iHrbiittrVi T?rilipT*t lMYvmll 


TtpnfliYin 


JL II Llll LIS XX 


V^fJIgdUc, XVOUt:! t X>dxlg© 


IVett/ 1 UTtb 9 I> • 1 • 


oartiei 10 


XydllxCxSUIl, X llvlllldo UdA LCI 


Tlnwi pi <inyi ir\Yi Yk 
ISlllllt/VOU 1 If UU/trt« 


Eaton 5 


l/d V xilotXll, XVvJUvTl t V^ilCILlCl 


1 nv n ninnl 1 <$ T^n 




JL/d V lo, X-illlC-OL JjIUW UUU 


11/ 1 Yi f*n P $iPY 

rr viiistivoijsr 


Do \r 1 ft 


iT)pvi<5nn AA/illiarn .Tr*Vm Jr 

AS <X V loUJU) T T XXXXd/XXX *J v/XXXXj »J J » 


TminirtTi 

J. \JL vl f VL\J 1 1 


\fr Pf>At'« 


XJcLj I Oil, o dill fro XVKIidlvl 


k^uificy 9 111, 


auani3 xo 


XJ'XAvFXX, V. ilal 11 o 


iLUflOUO V. t(U, ifi U» 


TTi n n r*! l tt ^ 
1TX loo JL 11 II V^lllllllt; 


TlrkTu - Tnnn A 1 rl T*ir» n 
1/UWj O UI11I xxllJlxCIl 


TfPnniTin 
llAsUAJilfty 




YliiTilfin A iPYflnriPT* A/Tpi rw^lr 

X^ UIIUJ^J, rXICAdllilCl XVAv^V^iAJlk 


f^hpmi C*hn<iP ~Mrl 


PpQQp |-T ICO 1 A. 


jL/UpUIlL, JOacpil KsjruK 9 «jr. 


Houma, La. 


Adams 6 


uyssxtj v^udiiiicio rxLitiii^ 


Andover 


Ballardvale Road 


Kmslpv .To^pti Vi WillipTii 

JLiXXXOlt ¥ , O UOC L#X1 T T 1X11CLXXX 


Methuen 


Methuen 


XJVdllo, X IJUHxda 


East Moriches, L. I., N. Y. Taylor 14 


x diiiowortii, v iulciil, «jr. 




Bishop 4 


h prmicnTi 1 -»-*i/"*T*crp v\y ^ lie 
x'cigu&uu, vjcuigc Yvtiia 


Springfield 


Draper 3 


T^Ipfrlipr T^rpHprirlc WpIIs 

x iLLviici j x iv.i.ici lviv t t cuo 


Shelbume, Vt. 


Bishop 5 


T^nlliQ Tlnlnli fxwiri 

X YJlllo, xvdipii VJT W 111 


San Francisco, Cal. 


Bishop 13 


T7iit*1/yii7 TTI/^tti^ Priorloc Tt» 
X U1IUW5 X lOj'il V/Ildlica, eli» 


New York, N. Y. 


Bishop 35 


Gallagher, George Brendan 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Adams 7 


Graham^ George Ross 


Washington, D. C. 


Mrs. Dole's 


vjrruas> vjuriiOJi v^ccn 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Dole's 


TTatrVi "Rvprptt PSraTilrlin 

J-XtlLV. 11, Xi VClClt X X CXXXXVXXXX 


Andover 


8 Florence St. 


Holmes, David Blodgett 


Janesville, Wis. 


Williams Hall 


Hopkins, John IVIilton 


Morristown, N. J. 


Abbot 5 


Houk, George Washington 


Dayton, Ohio 


Pease House 11 


jxuioerx, xrea ivianon 


Everett, Wash. 


Mr. Allen's 


«iuut:d f v^iidrica xxtriiry, or. 


Weston 


Adams 20 


tiuiics, vVdiLirr lvxcUilciauii 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Eaton 6 


Kalbach, Charles Ellwood 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 12 


Kohler, James Pollock, Jr. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Loomis, Richard Albert 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Woods 6 



80 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Lucas, Joseph Wilson, Jr. 


rtiilaaeiptoa, ra. 


Farrar 5 


McDonnell, Archibald Campbell 


Northampton 


FiotT Oft 

uay xo 


MacDonald, Roderic Noyes 


Winchester 


Mrs. Jackson's 


McRae, Arthur Alexander, Jr. 


Attleboro 


jjisnop oo 


Marshall, Koger Denton 


Lynn 


Adams 19 


Munger, Robert Louis 


JVaterbury, Conn. 


Pemberton 1 


Parker, Edward Allen 


Newton Lower Falls 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Patterson, Henry Clay, Jr. 


Youngsville, N . Y. 


r^aion i 


Pattison, Daniel Morse 


Brooklyn, N . Y . 


j: nniips y 


Paul, Howard Livingston 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Mrs. Jackson s 


Pearson, Robert Field 


Brookline 


i>isnop x 


Pilling, John William, Jr. 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 4 


r lace, Herbert Miller 


L ortlana, JM . i . 


rlllllips iy 


Quackenbush, Richmond Vliet 


Pembina, N. D. 


ijisnop o 


Quealy, Mahlon Kemmerer 


Kemmerer, JVyo. 


uay o 


Reed, Dana Leslie 


Andover 


KCi Colom Git 

ou oaiem ot. 


Sanders, George Stewart 


Dorchester 


Abbot 4 


bcheide, rnilip William 


tlartjora, Lonn. 


Day o 


Searles, Charles Colden 


Evanston, III. 


lay lor o 


Smith, Hamilton Keith 


Webster 


PViilliT-»c 8 

irnmips o 


Smith, Kenneth Baker 


Montclair, N . J. 


Tilo1-|/-\T-» 1 ft 

Disnop id 


Snitwongse, Mom Luang Chiew 


Bangkok, Siam 


Andover 5 


Snow, Otto Robinson 


niaaejora, Me. 


layior y 


Stephenson, Edward Edgerly 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


uay zi 


Stevens, Kenneth Hooker 


otieooygan, Wis. 


Mr. Brown's 


otevenson, llobert, od 


Winnetlca, ILL. 


Pease House 12 


Thomas, John Fox 


New Haven, Conn. 


jjisnop o 


licnnor, Arthur ivudolph 


Brookline 


Adams 13 


Tompkins, Sydney Edward 


New York, N. i . 


Hiaton l 


Upson, Charles Hiram 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Pemberton 1 


Van Patten, William James, 2d 


7x7-,,, V n y.l. AT V 

i\ ew i one, iv . i . 


layior iu 


Vogelgesang, Shepard 


New London, Conn. 


layior Is 


Weaver, Alan Vigneron 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Lyburcnui o 


W 7 eed, Eben Graves 


Marblehead 


Bancroft 7 


Willson, Sumner Lord 


Thompsonville, Conn. 


Miss Carter's 


Winnard, Walter Harry 


rittsjieLa 


Draper 1 


vvooa, xticnara r>atts 


Montclair, N.J. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Wrier tSt Alriprt Olin 


Rhprrill N Y 


T^TQTkPT 1 

iyldpcl J. 


Young, Thomas Herbert, Jr. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Taylor 20 


Yung, Hiu Fun 


Hong Kong, China 


Clement 1 



Lower Middlers — 90 
81 



CLASSIFICATION 



Classical Department — 

Class I — Seniors 104 
Class II — Upper Middlers 78 
Class III — Lower Middlers 53 

235 

Class IV — Juniors 123 

Scientific Department 

Class A — Seniors 59 
Class B — Upper Middlers 76 
Class C — Lower Middlers 90 

225 



583 



REPRESENTATION 



Massachusetts 


191 


Maryland 


3 


New York 


110 


North Dakota 


2 


Connecticut 


46 


South Dakota 


2 


New Jersey 


31 


Idaho 


2 


Pennsylvania 


25 


Texas 


2 


Illinois 


24 


Washington 


2 


Maine 


16 


Florida 


1 


Missouri 


14 


Georgia 


1 


Ohio 


14 


Iowa 


1 


New Hampshire 


12 


Louisiana 


1 


Minnesota 


10 


Mississippi 


1 


Kentucky 


7 


Oklahoma 


1 


Wisconsin 


7 


Tennessee 


1 


Colorado 


5 


West Virginia 


1 


Indiana 


5 


Wyoming 


1 


Michigan 


5 


China 


8 


Nebraska 


5 


Cuba 


2 


Rhode Island 


5 


South Africa 


1 


Vermont 


5 


Central America 


1 


California 


4 


Siam 


1 


District of Columbia 


4 






Virginia 


3 


Total 


583 



82 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



David J. Burrell, 1863 

William W. Farnam, 1862 
Henry P. Emerson, 1867 
Edward S. Martin, 1892 
William P. Day, 1877 
Alfred I. duPont, 1882 
Fred E. Weyerhauser, 1892 
William T. Bacon, 1902 



PRESIDENT 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



STATISTICAL SECRETARY 



George T. Eaton, 1873 
Frederick E. Newton, 1893 
Bernard M. Allen, 1888 



SECRETARY 



TREASURER 



New York City 

New Haven, Conn. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y. 

North Germantown, N. Y. 
Wilmington, Del. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Chicago, 111. 

Andover 
Andover 
Andover 



Meetings, with a reception and dinner, are held at Andover each year in 
connection with the graduation exercises. The date for 1918 will be June 14. 
It is desired that correspondence regarding membership and information 
concerning past members of the Academy be sent to the Statistical Secretary. 



BOSTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT 

Alfred L. Ripley, 1873 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 



William A. Mowry, 1854 
William B. Stevens, 1861 
Desmond FitzGerald, 1863 
Edward C. Smith, 1871 
William H. Moody, 1872 
Hollis R. Bailey, 1873 



William P. Sheffield, 1873 
Marcus Morton, 1879 
Arthur B. Chapin, 1887 
Arthur D. Coffin, 1889 
Charles H. Wilson, 1893 
Frederic W. Tilton 



SECRETARY 

Philip L. Reed, 1902; 248 Summer Street, Boston 

TREASURER 

Mortimer L. Seabury, 1905 



83 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 
Fred B. Lund, 1884 
Joseph W. Lund, 1886 
Elias B. Bishop, 1889 
Henry W. Beal, 1893 



Arthur Drinkwater, 1896 
Philip W. Thomson, 1898 
Joseph S. Seabury, 1900 
Howard M. Bartlett,1902 
F. Abbot Goodhue, 1902 
Philip L. Reed, 1902 



Stephen E. Young, 1894 
W. F. Merrill, 1895 



Raymond M. Crosby, 1893 
Brewer Eddy, 1894 
Frederick B. Greenhalge, 1894 



Robert T. Fisher, 1906 



BUFFALO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

C. Pascal Franchot, 1906; New York Telephone Building 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

S. G. Taylor, 1903; Prudential Building 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Eustace Reynolds; 1906; Erie County Bank Building 



CHICAGO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President vice-president 
William T. Bacon, 1902; Robert A. Gardner, 1908 



secretary-treasurer 
James W. Marshall, 1904; Chicago Savings Bank Trust Co. 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



S. Lewis Smith, 1885 



president 



vice-president 
Charles A. Otis, 1888 



DETROIT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT 

Charles Moore, 1874 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Burns Henry, 1896 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Kenneth L. Moore, 1910; 169 Van Dyke Ave. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Charles Moore, 1874 
Burns Henry, 1896 



C. Hay ward Murphy, 1902 
Kenneth L. Moore, 1910 



Steuart L. Pittman, 1908 



84 



NEW JERSEY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT SECRETARY 

Forrest F. Dryden, 1889 Albert Prey, 1881; 331 South Orange Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Decker, 1910 Allan M. Hirsh, 1898 

Kinsley Twining, 1897 



NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Francis R. Appleton, 1871 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Tracy H. Harris, 1882 Oliver G. Jennings, 1883 

SECRETARY 

Frank H. Simmons, 1894; 110 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. 

TREASURER 

Frank Dale Warren, 1879; 225 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Frederick W. Wallace, 1884 James L. Mills, 1897 

Henry J. Fisher, 1892 Fred S. Bale, 1902 

G. Ernest Merriam, 1892 Douglas H. Cooke, 1903 

F. Maurice Newton, 1895 Herbert H. Ramsay, 1905 



NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred E. Weyerhaeuser, 1892 John Crosby, 1886 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Edwin White, 1902; 93 East 4th Street, St. Paul, Minn. 
85 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Walter L. Murphy, 1868 William S. Wadsworth, 1887 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Horace 0. Wells, 1892; Pine Street, west of Broad, Peirce School 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Charles P. Sherman, 1867 Harry B. Hickman, 1894 

George L. Herrick, 1869 Frederic E. Whitney, 1898 

Seneca Egbert, 1880 Myron E. Fuller, 1907 

Herman V. Ames, 1884 Henry N. Merritt, 1908 

Joseph W. Lucas, 1885 Daniel B. Wentz, 1892 
Sydney Thayer, 1915 



PITTSBURGH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Edward H. Brainard, 1888 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

William H. Rea, 1875 Charles E. Beeson, 1890 

SECRETARY 

Southard Hay, 1898; Bessemer Building 

TREASURER 

James M. Magee, 1895; 314 Frick Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Earle R. Marvin, 1893, Chairman Chauncey O'Neil, 1899 

Charles C. McCord, 1868 Charles E. Irwin, 1900 

Clinton L. Childs, 1898 Turner D. Moorehead, 1906 



ROCHESTER ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Henry H. Stebbins, 1858 E. Franklin Brewster, 1866 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Fred H. Gordon, 1902; in care of Yates Coal Co. 



ST. LOUIS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred T. Murphy, 1893 Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Sidney R. Overall, 1903; Federal Reserve Bank Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

James E. Allison, 1885 A. Linn Bostwick, 1904 

Walter C. Taylor, 1885 Samuel N. Holliday, 1904 

Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Walter D. Wilcox, 1889 J. Breckenridge Bayne, 1900 

TREASURER 

James H. Hopkins, 1901; 1324 18th Street 

SECRETARY 

Ord Preston, 1894, 1822 R St., N. W. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

George X. McLanahan, 1892, Chairman 
Hon. Richard Wayne Parker, 1864 Robert S. Hume, 1894 

Irving H. Dunlap, 1881 Murray A. Cobb, 1899 

Henry S. Graves, 1888 A. Britton Browne, 1906 

John A. Mcllhenny, 1888 Robert C. Dove, 1907 



87 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIRST YEAR 



April, 1919 




Andover, Massachusetts 
THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1919 



1919 1920 1920 1921 



S M T w t f s 



t M T W T F 8 



S M T W T F 8 



JANUARY 



s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 

1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 













18 14 

20 21 



22 23 24 25 
29 80 81 













1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 















SEPTEMBER 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 


27 


28 


29 


30 



























1! 2 


3 


4 


8 9 


10 


11 


15 16 


17 


18 


22 23 


24 


25 



NOVEMBER 



4 5 

11|12 
18119 
25 26 



6 7 

13! 14 

20.21 
27,28 



DECEMBER 





1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 

















FEBRUARY 



23 24 25 26 27 



1 

8 

15 

22 

29 30 



6 

12 
19 

26 27 



8 

10 
17 
23 24 



3 
10 
17 
24 
30 31 



6 

13 

20 21 



7 

14 16 



28 24 25 



20 21 
27 



SEPTEMBER 



19 20 
26 27 



••I 1 
7 8 
14 15 

21 22 
28 29 













1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




30 


81 



















NOVEMBER 



41 5 
11112 
18 19 



DECEMBER 



13 14 15 



16 17 

22 23124 25 
30 31 



FEBRUARY 







1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


S 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 

























20 21 
27 













1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


2s 


29 


.30 



3 
10 
17 
24 
29 30 31 



6 

13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 



22 28 
29 80 



8 

10 
16 17 18 

24 25 



CALENDAR 



1919 



January 6 
March 21 
April 1 
June 12 

June 13 

June 17 arid IS 



June 21 



Monday, 845 p.m. 
Friday noon 
Tuesday, 845 p.m . 
Thursday noon 

Friday 

Tuesday and Wednesday 



Satu rday 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for two lower 

classes 
Commencement 

Entrance examinations in An- 
dover, New York City, Chi- 
cago, and other cities 

Third term ends for two upper 

classes 



September 10 

September 17 

September 18 

Xorember ->7 
December 18 



January 5 
March 18 
March 30 
June 17 

J une lx 
June 21 to 26 

June 22 and 2-3 



June 26 



Tm.sday, 'J.W a.m. 
Wednesday, 74-5 a.m. 
Thursday, 7 . ' t .j a.m. 



Thursday 
Thursday noon 



1920 



Monday. 8J5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 
Tuesday, 845 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



Tuesday and Wednesday 



Saturday 



Chapel, followed by entrance 

examinations 
Exercises begin for two lower 

classes 

Exercises begin for two upper 

classes 
Thanksgiving recess 
First term ends 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for two lower 

classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board exam- 
inations 

Entrance examinations in An- 
dover, New York City, Chi- 
cago and other cities 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



FOUNDERS 



Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS Hon. JOHN PHILLIPS, LL.D. 

Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS, Jr. 



Constitution and Deeds of Trust signed 
Board of Trustees organized, 
School opened for instruction, 
Act of Incorporation passed, 
Theological Seminary opened, 
Scientific Department opened, 
Archaeological Department opened, 
Theological Seminary incorporated, 
Theological Seminary real estate purchased, 



April 21, 1778 
April 28, 1778 
April 30, 1778 
October 4, 1780 
September 28, 1808 
September 27, 1830 
May 1, 1901 
April 16, 1907 
July 1, 1908 



PRINCIPALS 



ELIPHALET PEARSON, LL.D. 1778 — 1786 

EBENEZER PEMBERTON, LL.D. 1786 — 1793 

MARK NEWMAN, A.M. 1795 — 1810 

JOHN ADAMS, LL.D. 1810 — 1833 

OSGOOD JOHNSON, A.M. 1833 — 1837 

SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, LL.D. 1838 — 1871 

FREDERIC W. TILTON, A.M. 1871 — 1873 

CECIL F. P. BANCROFT, Ph.D., LL.D. 1873 — 1901 

ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 1903 — 



4 



TRUSTEES 



PRESIDENT 

ALFRED LAWRENCE RIPLEY, A.M. 
Elected 1902 

CLERK 

ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, Litt. D., L.H.D 
Elected 1903 

TREASURER 

JAMES COWAN SAWYER, A.B. 
Elected 1900 



GEORGE BROWN KNAPP, A.M. 
Elected 1899 

JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D. 
Elected 1899 

CLARENCE MORGAN, A.B. 
Elected 1900 

CLIFFORD HERSCHELL MOORE, Litt.D. 
Elected 1902 

Hon. HENRY LEWIS STIMSON, A.M. 
Elected 1905 

ELIAS BULLARD BISHOP, A.B. 
Elected 1907 

Hon. JOHN ADAMS AIKEN, LL.D. 
Elected 1908 

FRED TOWSLEY MURPHY, M.D. 
Elected 1908 

JOSEPH PARSONS 
Elected 1910 

FREDERICK GOODRICH CRANE 
Elected 1912 



Andover 
Andover 
Andover 

Boston 
Cambridge 
Shelburne, Yt. 
Cambridge 
New York City 
Newton Centre 
Greenfield 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Lakeville Conn 

D ALTON 



5 



FACULTY 



ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, A.M., Litt.D., L.H.D., Principal 

On the Peter Smith Byers Memorial Foundation 6 Chapel Avenue 

Instructor 1897-1903. Elected Principal 1903 



MATTHEW SCOBY McCURDY, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
GEORGE THOMAS EATON, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
CHARLES EMERSON STONE, Ph.B. 

Instructor in French 
CHARLES HENRY FORBES, A.M. 

Professor of Latin on the John C. Phillips Foundation 
♦ARCHIBALD FREEMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in History 
ALLEN ROGERS BENNER, A.B. 

Professor of Greek 
JAMES CHANDLER GRAHAM, S.B. 

Peabody Instructor in Natural Sciences 
BERNARD MELZAR ALLEN, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
FREDERICK EDWIN NEWTON, Ph.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing 
CHARLES PEABODY, Ph.D. 

Director of the Department of American 
Archaeology 
WARREN KING MOOREHEAD, A.M. 

Instructor in Archaeology and Curator of 
the Museum of American Archaeology 
LESTER EDWARD LYNDE, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
HORACE MARTIN POYNTER, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
PEIRSON STERLING PAGE, M.D. 

Physical Director and Medical Visitor 
GEORGE WALKER HINMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in Latin and History 
CECIL KITTREDGE BANCROFT, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin, Principals Assistant, 
and Registrar 
CHARLES ARTHUR PARMELEE, A.M. 

Instructor in French 
ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
* Absent in service of United States. 



60 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1873 
73 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1880 
158 Main Street 
Appointed 1890 
25 Hidden Road 
Elected 1891 

Appointed 1892 
Andover 7 
Elected 1892 
Phillips 5 
Appointed 1892 
56 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1893 
Williams Hall 
Appointed 1894 
9 Salem Street 
Appointed 1895 
197 Brattle Street, Cambridge 
Elected 1901 

Hidden Field 
Elected 1901 

195 Main Street 
Appointed 1901 
21 Phillips Street 
Appointed 1902 
193 Main Street 
Appointed 1902 
169 Main Street 
Appointed 1906 
Bartlet 5 
Appointed 1906 

Bartlet 22 
Appointed 1906 
79 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1907 



6 



♦MARKHAM WINSLOW STACKPOLE, S.T.B. 189 Main Street 

School Minister Appointed 1907 

GEORGE FRANKLIN FRENCH, A.M. 12 School Street 

Instructor in French and German Appointed 1907 

| CLAUDE MOORE FUESS, Ph.D. 183 Main Street 

Instructor in English Appointed 1908 

FREDERICK MAY BOYCE, A.M. Taylor Hall 

Instructor in Physics Appointed 1909 

GUY HEBARD EATON, A.B. Bancroft 8 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1909 

OSWALD TOWER, A.B. 32 Phillips Street 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1910 

FRANK O'BRIEN, A.B. Adams Hall 

Instructor in English Appointed 1910 

CARL FRIEDRICH PFATTEICHER, A.M. Eaton 7 

Instructor in Bible and Music Appointed 1912 

FREDERIC WILLIAM HEATON STOTT, A.B. 77 Bartlet Street 

Instructor in English and Public Speaking Appointed 1912 

Absent from February 1, 1919 

EDWIN TENNEY BREWSTER, A.M. 8 Judson Road 

Instructor in General Science Appointed 1916 
♦HOWARD WADSWORTH CHURCH, Ph.D. 

Instructor in German Appointed 1917 

DUMONT CLARKE, A.B. 215 Main Street 

Religious Secretary and Instructor in Bible Appointed 1917 

ROY EVERETT SPENCER, A.B. Pemberton 4 

Instructor in English Appointed 1917 

GUY JOHNSON FORBUSH, A.B. Draper 4 

Instructor in French Appointed 1917 

HARRY UPSON CAMP Williams Hall 

Instructor in Mathematics and Assistant in Physics Appointed 1917 

LESTER CHARLES NEWTON, A.M. 34 Salem Street 

Instructor in German Appointed 1918 

LAWRENCE V ROTH, A.M. Taylor Hall 

Instructor in History Appointed 1918 

FRANK MAY BENTON, A.B. Bancroft 1 

Instructor in English and Latin Appointed 1918 

HAROLD CRAWFORD STEARNS, A.B. Bishop 30 

Instructor in English Appointed 1918 

ARTHUR HOYT WASHBURN, A.B. Day 7 

Instructor in French and Latin Appointed 1918 

HENRY PRESTON KELLEY, A.B. Day 30 

Instructor in German, French, and Spanish Appointed 1918 

JOHN HART MANNING, A.B. Porter Road 

Instructor in Latin and History Appointed 1918 

♦Absent in service of the United States. 

t Absent in service of the United States until January 1, 1919. 



7 



CARL EUGEN GUTHE, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Archaeology 
SHARON OSBORNE BROWN, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
WINFIELD MICHAEL SIDES, B.S. 

Instructor in Mathematics, Drawing, and Physics 
WILLIAM OWEN CAMPBELL, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
Lieut. ROY EDWARD WYATT 

Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 
until December 19, 1918 



FREDERICK JOSEPH DALY, A.B. 

Private Secretary to the Principal 
SARAH LOW FROST 
Librarian 



OTHER OFFICERS 
VIRGIL D. HARRINGTON, A.B. 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 
HENRY S. HOPPER 

Bursar 
*FRANK L. QUINBY 

Secretary of the Bureau of Self-Help 
HARRIET L. ERVING 

Bookkeeper 
MABEL L. JONES 

Secretary to the Principal 
ALICE T. WHITNEY 

Recorder 
MONTVILLE E. PECK 

Assistant to the Physical Director 
MAIDIE L. ERVING 

Assistant in the Library 
ETHEL A. HITCHCOCK 

Assistant in the Superintendent's Office 
ETHEL M. EATON 

Assistant Secretary to the Principal 
MARIE DAVANEY 

Matron at I sham Infirmary 
Mrs. MABEL F. PARKS 

Matron at Williams Hall 
ANN S. LESLIE 

Assistant in the Treasurer s Office 
ALEXANDER SUTHERLAND 

Instructor in Boxing and Swimming 
RAY ARTHUR SHEPARD, B.S. 

Instructor in Athletics 
* Absent in service of the United States 



Adams Hall 

221 Main Street 
Appointed 1919 
Bishop 10 
Appointed 1919 
Day 5 
Appointed 1919 
Bishop 10 



Phillips 16 
201 Main Street 

18 Chapel Avenue 

25 Phillips Street 

Hidden Road 

43 Salem Street 

49 Whittier Street 

61 Bartlet Street 

Williams Hall 

59 Salem Street 

High Street 

67 Bartlet Street 

Isham Infirmary 

Williams Hall 

24 Brechin Terrace 

Brookline 

Adams 7 
Appointed 1919 



8 



ACADEMY PREACHERS, 1918-1919 



Rev. ARCHEY D. BALL, D.D. 


Maiden 


President CLARENCE A BARBOUR, D.D. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Rev. E. VICTOR BIGELOW 


Andover 


Rev. HUGH BIRCKHEAD, D.D. 


Baltimore, Md. 


Rev. KINGSLEY J. BHIGE 


Smyrna, Turkey 


Rev. NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, D.D. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Rev. ARTHUR H. BRADFORD, D.D. 


Providence, R. I. 


Dean CHARLES R. BROWN, D.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Rev. SAMUEL C. BUSHXELL 


Arlington 


Rev. HOWARD J. CHIDLEY 


Winchester 


Rev. ROBERT W. COE 


Dover, N. H. 


Rev. VAUGHAN DABNEY 


Durham, N. H. 


Rev. SAMUEL H. DANA, D.D. 


Exeter, N. H. 


Rev. D. BREWER EDDY 


Boston 


Rev. F. BOYT) EDWARDS 


East Orange, N. J. 


Rev. FREDERICK H. EMRICH 


Boston 


President W. H. P. FAUNCE 


Providence, R. I. 


Rev. ALBERT PARKER FITCH, D.D. 


Amherst 


Rev. RALPH HARLOW 


Boston 


President JOHN GRIER HIBBEN 


Princeton, N. J. 


Rev. EDGAR P. HILL, D.D. 


New York, N. Y. 


Bishop EDWIN H. HUGHES, D.D. 


Maiden 


Rev. WHJJAM A. LAWRENCE 


Boston 


Rev. A. SIDNEY LOVETT, Jr. 


Boston 


Rev. CHARLES S. MILLS, D.D. 


Montclair, N. J. 


Principal LEWIS PERRY, Litt.D. 


Exeter, N. H. 


Prof. WILLIAM LYON PHELPS, Ph.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


ROBERT E. SPEER, D.D. 


New York, N. Y. 


Principal ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 


Andover 


Rev. JOHN TIMOTHY STONE, D.D. 


Chicago, 111. 


Prof. HENRY HALLAM TWEEDY 


New Haven, Conn. 


Rev. BENJAMIN A. WILLMOTT 

9 


Boston 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is not a private school, but an endowed 
academy, controlled by a Board of Trustees and administered 
under the written constitution of its founders. By the terms 
of this Constitution, or Deed of Gift, signed April 21, 1778, 
Esquire Samuel Phillips (1715-1790) of North Andover and his 
brother, John Phillips (1719-1795) of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
set aside tracts of about 141 acres on Andover Hill and 200 acres 
in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, together with the sum of 1614 
pounds, as a foundation for a school. This document, outlining 
the broad principles upon which the proposed institution was to 
be conducted, was composed by Esquire Phillips 's son, Samuel 
Phillips, Jr. (1752-1802), with the advice and aid of his friend, 
Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826). Samuel Phillips, Jr. was after- 
wards Judge of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, 
President of the Senate, and Lieutenant-Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Although Judge Phillips derived many of his educational 
theories from the writings of John Locke and from the English 
nonconformist schools with the scheme of which he was familiar, 
his plan was nevertheless highly original. The purpose of the 
academy was specifically stated in the following words : — 

"And, in order to prevent the smallest subversion of the true intent of this 
Foundation, it is again declared, that the first and principal object of this 
Institution is the promotion of true Piety and Virtue; the second, instruction 
in English, Latin, and Greek languages, together with Writing, Arithmetic, 
Music, and the Art of Speaking; the third, practical Geometry, Logic, and 
Geography; and the fourth, such other of the liberal Arts and Sciences, or 
Languages, as opportunity and ability may hereafter admit, and as the Trustees 
shall direct. " 

10 



The chief emphasis was laid on the development of character, 
and the Master was to take pains "to regulate the tempers, to 
enlarge the minds, and form the Morals of the Youth com- 
mitted to his care". It was stipulated, also, that the school 
"shall be ever equally open to youth, of requisite qualifications, 
from every quarter ". The government was placed in the hands 
of a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. In order to prevent 
sectarianism and provincialism, it was specified that a majority 
of the members should be laymen, and that more than half 
must not be residents of the town in which the academy is 
located. The Trustees were hampered by no vexatious or 
trivial restrictions, but were given sole authority over the institu- 
tion. By the provisions of the Act of Incorporation, passed by 
the General Court, October 4, 1780, their number was fixed at 
never more than thirteen or less than seven, and they were 
permitted to possess real estate with an income not exceeding 
five hundred pounds and personal property with an income not 
greater than two thousand pounds. These holding powers have 
since been considerably enlarged by legislative enactments, as 
the school has grown. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Tuesday, April 28, 1778. Of the twelve original members, four 
were members of the Phillips family : Esquire Samuel Phillips, 
John Phillips, William Phillips of Boston, and Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. These men became in turn the first four presidents of the 
Board. The other members, all relatives or close friends of the 
Phillips family, were John Lowell and Oliver Wendell of Boston, 
Rev. Josiah Stearns of Epping, Rev. Elias Smith of Middleton, 
Rev. William Symmes of North Andover, and Rev. Jonathan 
French, Nehemiah Abbot, Esq., and Eliphalet Pearson of 
Andover. 

Phillips School, as it was called until its incorporation, was 
opened for instruction April 30, 1778, in a remodeled carpenter's 
shop on Andover Hill, thirteen pupils being present; before the 
year was over, fifty -two had registered. The first principal was 

11 



Eliphalet Pearson, a stimulating teacher and stern discipli- 
narian, who established high standards of instruction and 
supervision. Shortly before he resigned in 1786 to become a 
professor at Harvard, a new wooden building was erected to 
meet the demands of the rapidly expanding school. Pearson 
was succeeded by Ebenezer Pemberton, a polite and scholarly 
master, who devoted much attention to the manners of his 
pupils. When he left in 1793, he was followed in office by Mark 
Newman, in whose administration the Andover Theological 
Seminary was founded, largely through the efforts of Dr. 
Pearson. This seminary, which was opened September 28, 
1808, was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees 
of Phillips Academy, and remained in Andover almost exactly 
a century. 

The fourth principal, John Adams, who replaced Newman in 
1810, raised the prestige of the school, increased the attendance, 
and enlarged the faculty. He published the first catalogue and 
made the first revision of the curriculum ; but his primary interest 
was in the moral welfare of the boys. The second Academy 
building was burned on January 28, 1818, and a new brick, 
colonial edifice, designed by the famous architect Bulfinch, was 
erected within a year; this "classic hall", described in Oliver 
Wendell Holmes 's poem, The School Boy, is now in use as the 
Dining Hall. In 1830 the Teachers' Seminary, a new institu- 
tion made possible by a bequest of His Honor, William Phillips 
(1750-1827) of Boston, was opened in a massive square structure, 
commonly known as the Stone Academy, built for that purpose . 
This Teachers' Seminary, combining the aims of a normal 
school and a scientific school, was the second of its kind in the 
United States. After twelve years of existence with only 
moderate success it was finally, in 1842, merged with Phillips 
Academy as the "English Department", a name which was 
changed in 1892 to a more nearly accurate title, "Scientific 
Department ". 

12 



In 1832 John Adams resigned at the age of sixty, and Osgood 
Johnson was elected principal. Unfortunately he died inl837, 
of consumption, in his thirty-fifth year. During his adminis- 
tration the "Commons", dormitories known to so many gene- 
rations of Phillips boys, were built under the direction of 
Samuel Farrar, Esq., Treasurer of the Trustees. 

Samuel H. Taylor, whose reign of thirty-four years was the 
longest in the school history, became principal in 1837. The 
word "reign" is used advisedly, for he was an autocrat, severe 
in his methods of government and prompt to punish offenders. 
"Uncle Sam", as he was familiarly called, was a relentless 
drill-master in the classics and gained a well-deserved repu- 
tation for thoroughness and accuracy. He was a strong and 
vigorous personality, who made an enduring impression on all 
who came under his influence. In 1864 the Stone Academy 
was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by the present Main 
Building, which has since been twice reconstructed. In 1865 
Mr. George Peabody gave 825,000 to found the Peabody 
Instructorship in Natural Sciences, first filled by the late 
^Yilliam B. Graves. Dr. Taylor, on January 29, 1871, dropped 
dead in the vestibule of the Main Building. For the next 
two years the office of principal was held by Frederic W. Tilt on, 
who, however, could do little in that short period. 

The modern era of development began in 1873 with the 
arrival of Cecil F. P. Bancroft, who was principal until his 
death in 1901. Dr. Bancroft, working in a quiet, tactful, but 
persistent way, brought about many needed reforms. He 
first made a complete revision of the curriculum, thus enabling 
the school to meet the entrance requirements of any college, 
classical or scientific, and greatly broadening the range of 
studies. In his effort to gather about himself a larger and 
more efficient body of teachers he was entirely successful. The 
attendance also increased: in 1873 there were 252 pupils; in 
1895 this had grown to 524, and after 1892 it never again 
dropped below 400. Dr. Bancroft also strove to secure additions 

13 



to the plant, especially by providing dormitories in which boys 
could live under the direct supervision of instructors. He was 
aided in this aim by Melville C. Day of the class of 1858, who, 
in 1892, gave $8000 for a new dormitory, Taylor Cottage (now 
Pemberton Cottage), which was the beginning of the present 
extensive system of houses for students. Mr. Day continued 
his gifts, providing in all six dormitories which to-day furnish 
rooms for 168 boys, besides the teachers in charge. At his 
death in 1913 Mr. Day made Phillips Academy his residuary 
legatee. His gifts to the school amount in all to over $800,000. 

On June 5 and 6, 1878, Phillips Academy celebrated its 
centennial anniversary with elaborate exercises, including an 
historical paper by Rev. William E. Park, an oration by Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and 
speeches by Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Gustavus V. Fox, 
and other distinguished men associated with the school. At 
this time a fund of $100,000 was raised, partly for the en- 
dowment of a principalship and a professorship in Latin. 

Dr. Bancroft's period was marked by both progress and 
expansion. He was a man of clear vision and foresight, firm 
will, and shrewd discrimination, who had the good sense to be 
patient until circumstances were favorable for pressing his 
projects. His policy has been maintained by his successor, 
Alfred E. Stearns, during whose administration Phillips 
Academy has grown in material equipment, in numbers, and in 
efficiency. In 1908, when Andover Theological Seminary was 
moved to Cambridge, the Trustees acquired the entire Seminary 
plant on Andover Hill at a cost of $200,000, thus more than 
doubling its property in land and buildings. In 1901 two 
generous benefactors of the school, Mr. R. Singleton Peabody 
of the class of 1857, and his wife, Margaret Peabody, estab- 
lished the Archaeological Department and provided for it a large 
endowment for instruction, publication, and research, and for 
the care and housing of collections in American Archaeology. 

14 



The official installation of Principal Stearns into office happily 
coincided with the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the 
founding of the school, held on June 16, 1903. The guest of 
honor was His Excellency, Sir Chentung Liang Cheng, Minister 
Plenipotentiary from the Chinese Empire to the United States, 
who was a student at Phillips Academy in 1880 and 1881. At 
the exercises in the new Borden Gymnasium the speakers were 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie, Hon. Robert R. Bishop, Sir Chentung 
Liang Cheng, and Mr. Stearns. On the same day Brothers' 
Field was dedicated with an address from the principal donor, 
Mr. George B. Knapp. 



15 



THE ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is national in its representation and demo- 
cratic in its life and spirit, and is "equally open to youth of 
requisite qualifications from every quarter". It aims to attract 
students of serious educational purposes and high moral 
standards. 

The Academy is not a suitable school for boys who are idle, 
insubordinate, or lacking in self-control; nor is it adapted for 
those who require the constant supervision of teachers in the 
preparation of school work. Students who are found to be un- 
able or unwilling to meet the requirements, and those whose 
influence is injurious, must be withdrawn from the school. As 
maturity is not always to be measured by years, the school has 
no specific regulation as to the age of the candidate. In general, 
however, it has been found that boys of fourteen are able to meet 
the responsibilities of life in the Academy. 

The school provides accommodations and surroundings for its 
students which enable them to pass by gradual and natural 
stages from the paternalism of home life to the freedom that 
awaits them in college. Williams Hall, with its close supervision, 
special hours, and home life, offers attractive and helpful 
surroundings to the young boy just leaving home for his school 
career. A natural and progressive development is provided for 
subsequent years in the houses and halls which are in charge of 
married instructors. The regulations which obtain in all 
dormitories are here in force, but there is in them the atmos- 
phere of home. The later life of the dormitories is designed to 
develop a larger sense of responsibility and to prepare for the 
community life of college. Boys in the dormitories are under 
the supervision of instructors and are required to observe fully 
the regulations of the school. In the judgment of the school 

16 



authorities the average boy will secure the best results intel- 
lectually and morally by following out this gradual change in 
residence. 

LOCATION 

Andover is a town of eight thousand inhabitants, situated 
on the Portland Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
twenty-three miles north of Boston. For convenience the fol- 
lowing addresses are given: Miss Bertha Bailey, Principal of 
the Abbot Academy for girls; Chester W. Holland, Cashier 
of the Andover National Bank; F. A. Cardinal, Station 
Agent, Boston and Maine Railroad; John M. Stewart, mana- 
ger of the Phillips Inn; Hon. John X. Cole, the Andover Press 
and the Andover Bookstore. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

„ ,. . , Candidates for admission to the Academv are 
leshmomals . , . , . . , 

required to present testimonials of good moral 

character and certificates of standing in the schools formerly 
attended, and no application for admission can be accepted 
definitely until satisfactory letters have been received. These 
testimonials and certificates must be presented not later than 
the date of the entrance examinations, and should be forwarded 
earlier if possible to the Principal of the Academy. 
Entrance Examinations are required for entrance to the 

Rer uirements * nree l° wer classes. Although scholarship 
Three Lower recor ds of other schools are not accepted for 
£j asses admission to the several classes of the Academy, 

they are of service to the school officers in 
determining the classification of applicants. 

In filing application for admission the blank inserted in the 
back of this catalogue should be used. As the information called 
for on this blank is of importance to the school authorities, it 
should be given with the utmost attention to detail. 

17 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Junior Class: 

Arithmetic; English, grammar and composition; United 
States History or Geography: these subjects as ordinarily 
taught in grammar schools. 

Lower Middle Class: 

Arithmetic; Algebra, work of Junior year as given on page 
48; the work iu English prescribed for the Junior year on 
page 46 ; either French, the work of Junior year as given on 
page 43, or German, the work of Junior year as given on 
page 44; Latin, grammar and exercises; Caesar, Gallic War, 
Book II. 

Upper Middle Class: 

Algebra, work of Junior and Lower Middle years as given on 
page 48; Plane Geometry, work of Lower Middle year as 
described on page 49; the work in English prescribed for 
the Lower Middle year on pages 46-47; Latin, grammar and 
exercises; Csesar, Gallic War, four books; Nepos, ten lives; 
two year's work (four hours a week) in French or German, 
and one year 's work in either Greek or the second modern 
language. Candidates for the Scientific department may 
substitute for the second modern language a school certi- 
ficate in any accredited college examination subject in which 
at least four recitations a week have been held. 

Specimen examination papers will be supplied upon 
request. 

Entrance ^° examma ^ ons are regularly given by the 

_ . . Academy for admission to the Senior class. Ap- 
Kequirements . . , 

. ~, phcants may secure provisional credit for courses 

senior Class . . Al , , , x . 

pursued in other schools by presenting a certifi- 
cate or formal statement from the college of their choice, 
showing with what subjects the college has credited them 
towards admission. Such certificates may be obtained either 
by passing entrance examinations set by the college, or by 
presenting to the college the returns secured from the ex- 
aminations of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

18 



Credits may also be secured from colleges which admit on the 
certificate plan, by having the required statement filled out 
by the principal and sent to the college. Candidates for ad- 
mission to the Senior class should indicate in their preliminary 
correspondence the subjects credited to them in their college 
examinations. 

Seniors arrange their schedules on the basis of the college 
certificates which they hold, those studies being selected which 
best complete the student's preparation for his college or scien- 
tific school. The lists of Senior subjects given on pages 40 and 
41 exhibit the range of this selection. 

In the case of those who plan to enter college by the Compre- 
hensive Examinations, after one year in the Academy, formal 
approval of their previous courses must be granted by the 
Academy and examinations set by the school must be passed 
in those subjects which are to be continued. 

Students are not admitted to the Senior class later than the 
beginning of the winter term. 



1. College preliminary certificates are accepted as equivalents 
for the Phillips Academy courses which they represent. 

2. If the certificate covers all the courses up to the Senior 
year, the holder is admitted to full entrance to the Senior class, 
and is a diploma candidate. 

3. If the certificate covers all but eight hours a week of the 
courses up to the Senior year, the holder is admitted to the 
Senior class, but may or may not be a diploma candidate. 

4. If the certificate represents nine or more hours less than the 
courses up to the Senior year, the holder can not enter the 
Senior class. 



Diploma 
Requirements 



Candidates for the diploma of the Academy 
should note carefully the following statements 
relative to Senior standing : 



19 



Entrance Candidates for admission to the Junior, Lower 

r, ... Middle, and Upper Middle classes and "new 
Examinations , „ , . , „ . . .... 

plan candidates for the Senior class will be 

examined on Tuesday and Wednesday, June 17 and 18, 1919. 

Candidates must register between 9.00 a.m. and 9.30 a.m. at 

one of the following places : 

Andover: Phillips Academy, Graves Hall. 

Chicago: Hurd Hall, Northwestern University 

Building, corner Lake and Dearborn Sts. 

New York: Y.M.C.A. Building, 215 West 23d St. 

Examinations will be held in other large cities, in June 
only, if the number of candidates in any vicinity is sufficient. 

On Tuesday, September 9, 1919, examinations will be held 
at 9.30 a.m., in Andover only, according to a schedule of rooms 
and hours announced at that time. 

For examinations held hi Andover on these regular dates no 
fees are charged. For examinations held outside of Andover, 
and for special entrance examinations held at other times than 
those here given, a fee of $5.00 is required. 

Candidates intending to present themselves at these examina- 
tions should give early notice to the Registrar of the Academy, 
and are strongly urged to take the examinations in June while 
the subjects are still fresh in their minds. 

Where a prospective student's preparation does not exactly 
correspond with the school curriculum, he may take the ex- 
aminations of a higher, or lower, class than the one he plans to 
enter, in any subject for which he is prepared. 

The subjects upon which entrance examinations will be given 
in June and September are as follows : 

Junior Class Upper Middle Class 

Arithmetic Algebra 
English English 
Geography or Latin Grammar and 

United States History Composition 

20 



Lower Middle Class Caesar and Nepos 

Arithmetic and Algebra French 

English Geometry 

French German 

German Greek 
Latin Grammar and Caesar 

CLASSIFICATION 

A . , Candidates must be enrolled in one of the regu- 
Assignment . , 

to Classes classes. Owing to differences in prepara- 

tion it often happens that a student 's work lies 
mainly in two classes. In determining his classification in such 
instances a net aggregate of nine hours in the lower class neces- 
sitates enrolment with that class. Furthermore, whenever a 
student for any cause falls behind his class in a net aggregate 
of nine hours he must be registered with the lower class, 
o • , No special students, except foreigners, are re- 

ft. , . ceived in the Junior or Lower Middle year, and 

Students . A , . / . , 

the Academy makes no provision tor special 

students who are not candidates for graduation, or for entrance 
to college, scientific school, or professional school. 

Special courses may be arranged in the Upper Middle and 
Senior years, only at the written request of parents and by 
special Faculty vote. Such courses, without Latin, do not 
entitle the student to a diploma. 

At least the first and second years of Latin are required for 
the Scientific diploma. 

rp . . . Written examinations are held in each study at 
Examinations . ^ ^ , i-.ii 

least once a term, but the term grading is based 

D on the results of both written examinations and 

ltoiix otion s 

daily work. A student who is guilty of dis- 
honesty in an examination may be suspended or dismissed. At 
the close of each term, a report of the student's scholarship 
and attitude towards his work is sent to his parents or guardian. 
For admission requirements see page 18. 

21 



Mid-term reports are also sent for all students whose work is 
below the passing grade, 60 per cent, and for those who obtain 
grades of 80% and above. 

Each student is assigned to the special care of 
^ a member of the Faculty who is known as his 

Class Officer. This officer arranges the sched- 
ule of studies for each member of the class under his charge, 
and recommends such subsequent changes as seem desirable. 
r,. . . The entire school is divided into groups of 

JJlVXSZOTl 

approximately twenty students each. Each 
group is assigned to the special charge of an 
instructor whose duty it is to familiarize himself with the 
previous history and present standing of the several members 
and to serve as their counselor. 

APPOINTMENTS 
7.45 a.m. Morning chapel. 



Recitation 
and study hours. 



8.07 a.m. to 1.00 P.M. 

Daily 4.07 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 

Appointments 8.00 p.m. Evening study hours begin. 

10.30 a.m. and 5.15 p.m. Sunday chapel services. 
Half-holidays, Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noons. 

Stud Hours Students are expected to occupy themselves 
with their studies or other school work during 

all study hours. 

Al Every absence of the student from recitation, 

rk t) ^P71 PP c \ 

morning chapel, Sunday service, or from his 
room during study hours, must be accounted for. The accumu- 
lation of eight unexcused absences involves suspension from 
school. In all cases of illness, notice must be sent at once to the 
Medical Visitor, who investigates daily all cases reported. 

Special importance is attached to meeting all appointments 
immediately preceding and following vacation and recess periods. 
A failure to meet such appointments must be regarded as a very 



22 



serious offence and may necessitate withdrawal from school. 
Out of town ^ out-of-town excuses must be obtained from 
„ the Principal. On half -holidays and on spe- 

Lxcuses • i i i- 1 i j 

cial holidays such excuses are granted occa- 
sionally to those whose school standing is good. The student 
who goes out of town without permission forfeits his connection 
with the school. 

zf i - • Students are required to be present at morning 

Exercises chapel. The Sunday services in the Chapel 

and the religious work of the school are in 
charge of the School Minister, who is also the pastor of the 
Academy Church, an undenominational organization. Dis- 
tinguished clergymen are frequently invited to preach to the 
school. The Society of Inquiry holds a voluntary meeting on 
Sunday evening, usually addressed by some invited speaker. 

Upon written request from their parents, students may be 
excused to attend the morning services of the Protestant Epis- 
copal, Baptist, or Roman Catholic churches. 

EXPENSES 

Parents can estimate approximately the expenses of their sons 
at the Academy, and they are particularly requested not to 
furnish money beyond what is necessary for modest expendi- 
tures. Pupils who are supplied with much spending money, 
or who are allowed to incur debts, often accomplish little in 
their studies, and are liable to form habits which require their 
withdrawal from the school. Parents are earnestly requested 
to refuse permission to their sons to contract debts. The 
schedules of the items named below indicate the ordinary cost 
for limited, average, and ample expenditure. 

*Economical Moderate Liberal 
Tuition, $200.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Room, light, and heat, 40.00 175.00 200.00 

Board, 210.00 210.00 297.50 

Athletic charge, 9.00 15.00 15.00 



$459.00 $600.00 $712.50 

*Scholarship boys by earnest endeavor may meet these charges in part or 
in whole. 

23 



. . R The tuition for the year is $200.00 divided as 
follows: three-fifths, or $120.00, payable Oct- 
ober 1; two-fifths, or 80.00, payable on March 1. Each student 
is required to deposit with the Treasurer on entering the school 
the sum of $10.00 to cover breakage and other obligations which 
may be incurred during the school year. The balance remaining 
after such charges have been deducted will be returned. 

An additional charge of $8.00 is made to the final bills of 
members of the Senior class to cover the expenses of Commence- 
ment. A rebate of $1.50 from this charge is made if the student 
fails to secure his diploma. Students in Chemistry and Physics 
are charged for the supplies which they use. All bills are mailed 
to parents or guardians, or may be paid in person by the 
students. Class-room privileges will be denied to students 
whose bills are not settled on or before the dates mentioned 
above. As instructors must be engaged and other provisions 
for education must be made by the school authorities for the 
entire year in advance, tuition charges will not be refunded when 
students are suspended, dismissed, or withdrawn during the school 
year. Checks should be drawn in favor of the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy. 

T j. The regular tuition charge includes an allow- 

/ ntirmaru 

. ance of $10.00, credited to each student for 

\ PY1Y) OP 

infirmary service, and entitling him to care and 
board — during illness — at the infirmary for a period not to 
exceed seven days during any one school year. Boys who are 
compelled to use the infirmary for longer periods are charged at 
the regular rate of $2.00 a day. Extra charges are made for 
operations and diseases requiring special nursing. At the dis- 
cretion of the Principal, this charge may be remitted in the case 
of scholarship boys. 

Athletic Fee ^ charge of $5.00 a term is made for the 
maintenance of athletics, but for scholarship 
applicants this charge is $3.00 a term which may be paid in 

24 



whole or in part by the performance of special work assigned 
by the Treasurer. Three-fifths of the total amount of this 
charge is payable October 1st, and two-fifths on March 1st. 
Students are not asked to contribute further to the financial 
support of the various school teams. 

Room Rent Payments for student rooms in the school 
buildings are required as follows: three-fifths 
of the entire yearly rental on or before October 1 ; the remaining 
two-fifths on March 1. A deposit of $25.00, which will be 
credited to the first regular payment of room rent, is required 
when the contract for the room is filed and the assignment 
made. When a room is assigned to a student, his parent or 
guardian agrees by contract to pay the entire rental of the room 
up to the close of the current school year, whether the student con- 
tinues a member of the Academy or not. The right is reserved 
by the Trustees to transfer boys from room to room in the 
school buildings whenever changes seem desirable; such changes, 
however, do not relieve the original occupants from the obliga- 
tion of meeting the entire year's rent unless newcomers are 
secured to fill the vacancies. 

Each room is furnished with a rug, desk, chiffoniere, chairs, 
bed, and bedding. Towels are not included. 

No refund of deposits will be made until the close of books for 
the fiscal year, June 30. 

PRICES OF ROOMS FOR 1919-1920 

SINGLE ROOMS 

$100.00. Andover, Nos. 3, 5; Pease, No. 14; Woods, No. 8; Clement, No. 6. 
$125.00. Churchill, No. 4; Hardy, Nos. 4, 5 
$135.00. Woods, No. 7. 

$150.00. Churchill, No. 6; Clement, Nos. 3, 5, 8; Taylor, Nos. 5, 12, 19, 26; 

Tucker, Nos. 2, 4, 5. 
$160.00. Woods, No. 5. 

$175.00. Bishop, No. 34; Churchill, No. 3; Clement Nos. 4, 7; Day, 
Nos. 15, 22, 34; Farrar, No. 3; Hardy, Nos. 1, 2, 3; Taylor, 
Nos 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27. 

25 



$200.00. Abbot, Nos. 11, 13, 14; Adams, Nos. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20; 

Bishop, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; 

Clement, No. 1; Day, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 

26, 31, 32; Phillips, Nos. 3, 4, 7, 10, 14, 15, 18, 21; Taylor, Nos. 

7, 14, 21, 28. 
$225.00. Clement (private bath), No. 2. 



SINGLE SUITES 



$200.00. Eaton, Nos. 3, 4. 
$225.00. Clement, No. 13. 

$250.00. Adams, Nos. 1, 7, 18, 24; Andover, No. 4; Bartlet, Nos. 4, 10, 11, 14, 
15, 16, 23, 24, 27, 28; Bishop, Nos. 7, 13, 36; Day, Nos. 13, 36. 



DOUBLE ROOMS 

$135.00. Abbot, Nos. 4, 5, 7, 16; Farrar, Nos. 4, 6; Pease, Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. 
$150.00. Churchill, Nos. 2, 5; Tucker, No. 3. 
$175.00. Tucker, No. 1. 

DOUBLE SUITES 
$160.00. Abbot, Nos. 6, 15; Farrar, No. 5. 

$175.00. Andover, Nos. 1, 6, 9; Bancroft, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 
18; Draper, Nos. 3, 5, 6; Eaton, Nos. 1, 5, 6; Pemberton, Nos. 1, 
3, 5, 6,; Woods, No. 6. 

$200.00. Adams, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 23; Bartlet, Nos. 1, 2, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 30; Bishop, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 
33, 35; Day, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 33, 35; Phillips, 
Nos. 2, 12; Taylor, Nos. 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25. 

$225.00. Phillips, Nos. 1, 8, 11, 13, 19, 22. 

$275.00. Bartlet (private baths) Nos. 7, 20. 



jfo om About twenty "room scholarships" amount- 

* i j t • ing to approximately $50.00 each are available 
for deserving boys. These scholarships will be 
credited to the regular room charges on the recipients' term 
bills and will be awarded by the Principal to boys whose cir- 
cumstances compel them to keep their expenses at a low average. 



Di ' Hall ^ C ecm *P ment °^ ^ e Academy includes a well- 
appointed Dining Hall which is under the 
charge of a manager, and accommodates two hundred and fifty 
boys. The price of board for the present year has been $6.00 a 
week. Extra orders are served at cost. 

Private About eighteen private houses in the vicinity of 

Houses ^ e Academy, under license from the Trustees, 

provide board and lodgings for students, 
and no student may occupy any house not thus licensed by the 
school. Some of the houses provide furnished rooms only; 
others provide rooms and board, and some furnish board for 
students rooming in neighboring houses. The price of table 
board is $7.50 to $10.00 a week. Students rooming in private 
families may, if they desire, board at the Dining Hall. The 
price of furnished rooms, including ordinary service, is from 
$3.00 to $6.50 a week. 

As engagements for rooms in private families continue to 
the end of the Academic year, care should be exercised in the 
selection of rooms. Engagements for table board may, on 
suitable notice, be terminated at the close of any term. Ar- 
rangements and payments for room and board in private houses 
must be made with those in charge of the houses. 



SUMMARY OF PAYMENTS 



Tuition 1st payment, Oct. 1; $120.00 2nd payment, March 1; $80.00 

Athletic Fee: 1st " "1; 9.00 2nd " "1; 6.00 

Room: 1st " "1; three- 2nd " "1; two- 
fifths of total charge. fifths of total charge. 
Deposit: Payable October 1; amount, $10.00. 
Graduation Fee: Payable March 1; amount, $8.00. 
Table Board: Payable one half-term in advance. 



27 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 



Williams Hall Throu S h the g enerosit y ° f Prof. Edward H. 
A Dormitor for Williams, Jr., of the class of 1868, the school 
Y d in 1910 secured possession of a valuable piece of 

property for the housing and care of younger 
boys. The property, comprising several acres, adjoins the old 
campus and is within a short distance of the other school 
buildings. 

Williams Hall has attractive accommodations for twenty- 
four boys. The rooms are spacious, light, and airy, and are 
heated with hot water and lighted with electricity. On the 
main floor is a common reading and recreation room. Table 
board is furnished in the building to all occupants of the house. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to provide in this building sur- 
roundings as helpful as possible for the best development of 
young boys, and to this end they have placed it in charge of a 
married instructor. Boys whose work is below standard may 
be required to report at seven-thirty each evening, where they 
work under supervision and are free to consult the resident 
instructor and his assistant in regard to their studies. 

Williams Hall supplies a stepping-stone between the natural 
restrictions of the home and the somewhat freer life of a large 
school. Although the boys who live here have all the advan- 
tages that Phillips Academy offers, they are under somewhat 
closer supervision than is customary throughout the rest of the 
school. For the school year 1919-20 the charge for room and 
board in Williams Hall, not including the regular tuition charge, 
will be $550.00. A limited number of room scholarships are 
awarded annually in this hall. A special circular explaining 
in detail the equipment and arrangements of Williams Hall, 
and containing both interior and exterior views of this building, 
will be furnished on request. 



28 



_ „ T1 The school provides for dormitory purposes 

Faculty Houses . , . , £ , . , . , , 

* eight houses formerly occupied as private dwel- 

lings. These houses are suitable for younger boys, especially 
those who are members of the two lower classes. Each house 
is in charge of a resident married instructor. The rooms are 
furnished, and the charges include heat, light, and care of the 
rooms. 

The Abbot House provides accommodations for nineteen 
boys, the Churchill House for seven, the Clement House for 
thirteen, the Farrar House for seven, the Hardy House for 
five, the Pease House for nine, the Tucker House for seven, 
and the Woods House for five. 

Dormitories Through the generous gifts of Mr. Melville C. 

Day of the class of 1858, Mr. Warren F. Draper 
of the class of 1843, and a number of citizens of Andover, and by 
the purchase of the property formerly belonging to the Andover 
Theological Seminary, the Academy now possesses thoroughly 
modern dormitories providing at reasonable rates attractive 
accommodations for almost the entire student body. Below is 
given a brief description of these various buildings, and a list 
of the prices of rooms in each will be found on pages 25-26. With 
the exception of some of the Faculty Houses and Williams Hall 
these buildings are of brick. All are furnished, heated by 
steam, lighted by electricity, and equipped with shower-baths 
and the modern sanitary conveniences. Most of the study 
rooms have open fireplaces. Each building or entry is in charge 
of a resident instructor. 

Phillips Hall, erected in 1808, was entirely remodeled in 
1912. It is divided by a fire wall into two separate entries and 
provides accommodations for fourteen boys in each entry. 

Bartlet Hall was erected in 1817, and entirely rebuilt in 19 15 . 
This building also is divided by a fire wall into two separate 

29 



entries, and contains both double and single suites, accommo- 
dating twenty-one boys in each entry. 

Pemberton Cottage, erected in 1891, contains five double 
suites. 

Andover Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double 
suites, one single suite, and two single rooms. 

Draper Cottage, erected in 1892, contains five double 
suites. 

Eaton Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double suites 
and two single suites. 

Bancroft Hall, erected in 1900, contains fourteen double 
suites. The building is divided by fire walls into three separate 
entries, each entry accommodating ten boys. 

Day Hall, erected in 1911, contains twelve double suites, two 
single suites, and twenty single rooms. The building is divided 
by a fire wall into two separate entries, each entry accommo- 
dating twenty -three boys. 

Bishop Hall, erected in 1911, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Day Hall and accommodates the same 
number of boys. 

Adams Hall, erected in 1912, is divided into two separate 
entries, each of which, like the Faculty Houses, is in charge of 
a married instructor. Each entry accommodates eighteen boys. 

Taylor Hall, erected in 1913, accommodates eighteen boys 
in each of its two entries and is in charge of two married in- 
structors. 

(For prices of rooms see pages 25-26.) 

Main This recitation building was erected in 1865 

Building and contains twelve recitation rooms. 



30 



Gr e Hall Graves Hall, devoted to Science, contains in 
addition to the large and well-equipped labora- 
tories for Physics and Chemistry, four recitation rooms, a 
lecture room, and a drafting room. 



™ tt ii Pearson Hall, erected in 1817 and remodeled in 

Pearson nail • j <? tj. 

1878, is used tor recitation purposes. It con- 



tains six large recitation rooms. 



Archaeology 
Building 



This building contains rooms for the collection 
of the Department of Archaeology and a lecture 
room. 



P b d H e P eaDO( ^y House bears the name of the founders 
of the Archaeological department, with the 
funds of which it was erected. The building carries out the 
expressed wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody that their bene- 
faction should promote the social interests of the student body 
as well as further the study of American Archaeology. Quar- 
ters are provided for the Phillips Union and include a well- 
appointed grill, a large and attractive reading room, and a 
memorial room used as an assembly hall for receptions, lectures, 
and meetings of the various organizations of the school. 



A 7 . . , .. Brechin Hall, formerly used as the library of 
Administration , . , , , . . , 

Offices and lneological seminary, has been extensively 

T altered inside and is now used for administra- 

tive and library purposes. The lower floor 
contains the offices of the Principal, the Treasurer, and the 
Registrar. A large hall on the upper floor is devoted to the 
library of over ten thousand volumes, which is in charge of a 
trained librarian and is open daily for the use of students. 



31 



The Cha el ^ e ^ na P e ^ provides accommodations for the 
religious exercises of the school. The daily 
morning chapel exercises and the Sunday preaching and vesper 
services are held in this building. The Chapel contains the 
William Couch Egleston memorial organ. 

Borden ^ C ^ ca d emv nas a l ar £ e gymnasium, com- 

r . pletely equipped with modern apparatus, and 

in charge of a Physical Director who is also 
the Medical Visitor. Students of all classes are required to take 
regular gymnasium work. 

. • n 7 The swimming pool, adjoining the gymnas- 
Swimmmg Pool . ± ° £ . . , & , . ? * , A 
mm, is seventy-live leet long and thirty leet 

wide, and represents the most modern ideas in swimming pool 
construction. The elaborate filtration plant in the basement of 
the building assures the purity of the water used in the pool. 

The swimming pool was constructed in 1910 with funds se- 
cured entirely by the efforts of the students themselves. 

Philli s Inn ^ G sc ^° ^ P r °perty includes a well-equipped 
hotel, situated in the centre of the grounds, 
under lease to a manager, and furnishing to parents and friends 
of the school quiet and comfortable accommodations. 

The Isham ^ e ^ ca d emv mam tains an infirmary, the gen- 
, n erous gift of Miss Flora E. Isham, whose name 

it bears. The infirmary was completed in 1912, 
is thoroughly modern in all its appointments, and was carefully 
planned under the direction of experts in hospital construction. 
In addition to the general wards, it contains single rooms for 
those requiring special treatment, an operating room, and quart- 
ers for visiting parents. The contagious wards are completely 
separated from the ordinary wards, and at each end of the build- 
ing there is a large sun parlor entirely encased in glass. Boys 
who are sufficiently indisposed to be unable to attend classes 
are sent to the infirmary for proper care. Except when special 



32 



arrangements have been made in advance by parents or guar- 
dians, the following regulations will be observed in the conduct 
of the infirmary. Patients at the infirmary requiring medical 
attention shall call in local physicians approved by the school 
authorities. In cases requiring the attendance of special- 
ists, the best men available in Boston will be called in con- 
sultation. In special emergencies, when operations seem 
necessary and parents cannot be consulted in advance, the 
Principal of the school assumes responsibility for authorizing 
such operations. The Physical Director may at any time 
examine and report upon individual cases. 



ball, and track athletics. The Academy possesses other exten- 
sive grounds for various athletic sports, including baseball, 
football, soccer, lacrosse, and tennis. 



Athletic 
Grounds 



Brothers' Field, comprising twenty -three acres, 
is in close proximity to the gymnasium and 
contains ample facilities for baseball, foot- 



* 



33 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND ENDOWMENT 



o t i j . The sums granted as scholarships vary accord- 

ing to the excellence of the boys in their 
studies, a student of the highest rank receiving 
a sum equivalent to the full tuition fee. Every new applicant 
for a scholarship must pay on entering the Academy the sum 
of $50 toward his tuition. This sum is not remitted. At the 
close of each term scholarships are adjusted in accordance 
with the student's record in his studies during that term. Boys 
of limited means who possess scholarly ability and ambition are 
encouraged to apply for admission, and, if admitted, may be 
reasonably sure of financial assistance. 

„ . , Furnished rooms are set apart in various 

n . . - dormitories for boys who are obliged to keep 

Provision for . . * . Al . . . . 

nij t • r> their expenses within the lowest possible 

p limits. A rental of $40 to $50 is charged each 

occupant of these rooms. Choice of room is determined by the 

scholarship rank of the applicant. 

a u> tt i Ample opportunities are afforded by the Acad- 

S elf Help i i i - i x _ • . 

emy to scholarship boys to earn a portion of 

their school charges. Service in the Dining Hall and boarding 
houses enables them to earn their board. Several agencies are 
assigned by the Bureau of Self Help and a number of students 
may earn a portion of the school charges by work in connec- 
tion with the school offices, and in caring for recitation rooms. 
An energetic boy may find various other chances for remunera- 
tive work. 



q i j 7 . The Students' Educational Fund, begun with a 

r, , gift of $100 from the Senior Class of 1854, now 

Funds & I x * eff nn 

amounts to $5,700. 

The Farrar Fund, a legacy from a former Treasurer, Samuel 
Farrar, established in 1865, amounts, with additions from 
income, to $22,000. 

34 



The Clarke Scholarship Fund of $1,200 was established in 1870 
in memory of Mrs. John Aiken Clarke. 

The Samuel H. Taylor Memorial Fund of $3,700 was estab- 
lished in 1871. 

The Peter Smith Byers Scholarship of $500 was established in 
1878 by the late John Byers. 

The Class of 1878 Scholarship Fund, established by the Classi- 
cal Class of 1878, amounts to $847.26. 

The Jonathan Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1878 by the late Edward Taylor in memory of his father. 

The French Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 1879 by 
the bequest of Hiram W. French. 

The Caroline Parker Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1880 by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy. 

The Alden Memorial Fund of $5,000, a legacy from the late 
Dr. Ebenezer Alden, was established in 1881. 

The Gerard Sumner Wiggin Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1881 by the bequest of Lady Elizabeth Sumner 
Buckley -Mathew Fleming. 

The Stone Educational Fund of $25,000 was established in 
1882 by Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Warren F. Draper Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Warren F. Draper. 

The Richards Scholarship of $1,450 was established in 1889 
by the late Mrs. Mary A. Richards in memory of her sons. 

The Charles L. Flint Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the bequest of Hon. Charles L. Flint. 

The Henry P. Haven Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1890 by the estate of Henry P. Haven. 

The Emma Lane Smyth Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1890 by the late Ex-Governor Frederick Smyth of New 
Hampshire. 



35 



The James and Per sis Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Mrs. Mary E. Fairbanks. 

The Dowe Scholarship Fund, established in 1892 by the be- 
quest of Joseph Dowe, amounts to $3,097.98. 

The John Cornell Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was established 
in 1894 by the bequest of John Cornell for pupils from the town 
of Andover. 

The James Calvin Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was founded 
in 1895 by his sister, the late Mrs. Mary W. Fairbanks. 

The Mary W. Holbrook Fund of $500 was founded in 1900 
by legacy of Mary W. Holbrook. 

The Fdward Taylor Fund, a legacy from the late Edward 
Taylor, established in 1900, amounts to $1,000. 

The Ruby A. Carter Scholarship of $1,500 was founded in 1905 
by the late Mrs. Ruby A. Carter, in memory of her husband 
and daughter. 

The Herman Verlwff Hartwell Scholarship of $2,000 was 
founded in 1907 by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Hartwell in memory 
of their son. 

The Timothy A. Holt Scholarship Fund of $26,000 was estab- 
lished in 1908 by the bequest of Timothy A. Holt, for the benefit 
of pupils from the town of Andover. 

The James Huntington Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1910 by the widow and daughter of James Huntington, 
P. A. 1848. 

The Charles Clayton Clough Memorial Fund of $220 was 
founded in 1912 by his friends. 

The Allan Morse Penfield Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1913 by the legacy of Allan Morse Penfield, P. A. 1904. 

The George B. Knapp Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1914 by a legacy of Miss Katharine Knapp. 

36 



The James Greenleaf Fuller Memorial Scholarship of $200 is 
sustained by Samuel Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, in memory of his 
brother, and is available during his Senior year for a student 
of limited means, who in the judgment of the Principal embodies 
the best ideals of school life in scholarship, character, and 
influence. 

The Class of 1871 Andover-Harvard Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by Henry S. Van Duzer, P. A. 1871, is awarded on the 
basis of high scholarship to a member of the Senior class who is 
preparing for Harvard; the award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his record 
up to that time. 

The Class of 1871 Harvard- Andover Scholarship of $300, also 
sustained by Henry S. Van Duzer, is available for a graduate of 
Phillips Academy during his Freshman year in Harvard Col- 
lege; the award, based on high scholarship, is made by the 
faculty of Phillips Academy, and is announced at the close of 
the recipient's Senior year in the school. 

The Henry P. Wright Scholarship of $300, sustained by an 
alumnus of the Academy in memory of Henry P. Wright, P. A. 
1863, late dean of Yale College, is awarded on the basis of high 
scholarship and character to a member of the Senior Class who 
is preparing for Yale. The award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his 
record up to that time. 

The Winston Trowbridge Townsend Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by John A. Keppelman, P. A. '97, in memory of his class- 
mate and friend, Winston Trowbridge Townsend, is awarded 
at graduation to that member of the Senior class preparing for 
Yale, who, in the judgment of the Principal, is entitled, through 
scholarship, character, and influence, to special commendation. 



37 



The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship of fifty dollars 
is awarded annually to a member of the Academy, preference 
being given to a son of a member of the association. 

The John Reed Williams Scholarship at Yale is available to 

Phillips Academy graduates under the following terms of gift: 

"The income from the John Reed Williams Fund of one thousand dollars, 
* * * is awarded annually at the close of Freshman or Sophomore year, * * * 
to a member of the Academic Freshman or Sophomore class, preferably from 
Phillips Academy, Andover, who is helping to support himself by his own efforts 
and has proved himself to be a man of high character, and of large promise, 
especially in English Literature or History." 

The Columbia University Scholarship. A scholarship, which 
practically amounts to the tuition charges, is granted by Colum- 
bia University each year to a student of Phillips Academy who 
has satisfied the full requirements for admission to the College, 
and whose standing in the Academy has been of sufficiently 
high grade to gain the recommendation of the school faculty. 
The scholarship may be renewed in the years following the 
Freshman year if a high grade is maintained. 

The Wesleyan University Scholarship. Wesleyan University 
grants each year to a student of Phillips Academy going to the 
University, a scholarship equal in amount to the tuition bill 
of the Freshman year. Provided the quality of his work 
warrants it, the scholarship is renewed each year throughout 
the college course. The award is made to that student whose 
high scholarship, in the opinion of the Academy Faculty, en- 
titles him to the scholarship. 

In addition to these scholarships, prizes amounting to $770.00 
are awarded annually. The conditions governing these prizes 
are given on pages 54 — 59. 



38 



5YNOP5I5 OF THE COURSE OF STUDY 



As the subjects are taught with a view to the student's pro- 
gressive development, it is desirable for him to take the entire 
course in the Academy. In order that he may plan his work to 
the greatest advantage, it is important that he decide as early 
as possible upon the higher institution which he intends to enter. 
He is designated as a classical or a scientific student in accord- 
ance with the character and requirements of the institution 
selected. The course of study is designed to furnish adequate 
preparation for any college or scientific school. 

Note — In order to define the work of the pupil in his last year, it is required 
that he take preliminary examinations for some college. June examinations, 
both preliminary and final, are held in Andover by the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 



THE CLASSICAL COURSE 



Required H rs. 
Latin 1 5 
English 1 4 
Algebra 1 5 
Physical Training 3 

17 



Required 
Latin 2 
English 2 

Algebra 2 1 
Plane Geometry 1 J 
French 2 
or 

German 2 

Physical Training 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR 
Electives (5) 
French 1 
German 1 

Choir 



Hrs. 

5 Two class exercises with- 
5 out home study count as 
one hour 

1 



CLASS III — LOWER MIDDLE 



3 (with Public 
Speaking) 



Electives (4) 
Greek 1 
French 1 
German 1 
Choir 



19 



39 



CLASS II — UPPER MIDDLE 



Required 

Latin 3 5 

English 3 3 

Algebra 3 \ 5 

Plane Geometry 2 / 

Physical Training 3 

16 



Electives (6-8) 



Greek^ 


5 


Greek 1 


4 


Greek Testament 


1 


French* 1 or 1 


4 


3 2 1 

German" 3 , ^ or 1 


4 


American History 


4 


fAncient History 


5 


English History 


5 


Classical History 


2 


Physics 


* 4 


Chemistry 


*4 


Choir 


1 



.Required 
English 4 4 
Physical Training 3 



CLASS I — SENIOR 

Electives 

Latin (Horace) 1 

Latin 4 5 

Greek Testament 1 

Greek 3 4 

Greek 2 5 

American History 4 

fAncient History 5 

English History 5 

Causes of the War 2 

Physics *4 

Chemistry *4 
Trigonometry and 

Solid Geometry 4 



(16 or 17) 

Algebra 4 (Advanced) 2 

Mech. Drawing **3 

French 3 or French 2 4 

French 4 2 

German 3 or German 2 4 

German 4 2 

Spanish 4 

Public Speaking 2 

Bible 2 2 

Harmony 2 

Archaeology 1 

Choir 1 



Numbers placed at the right and above a subject indicate successive courses in the same 
subject. 

fNot open to those who elect Classical History. 

*Each laboratory period occupies 2 hours, but counts only 1 hour on the schedule. 
♦♦Mechanical Drawing takes 6 hours of time, but counts only 3 hours on the schedule. 



THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR 

Required Hrs. Electives (5) Hrs. 

Latin 1 5 French 1 5 Two class exercises with- 

English 1 4 German 1 5 out home study count 

Algebra 1 5 one hour 

Physical Training 3 Choir 1 



17 

40 



CLASS C — LOWER MIDDLE 



Required 
Latin 2 
English 2 
Algebra 2 
Plane Geometry 1 
French 2 

or 

German 2 
Physical Training 



Electives (4) 



5 
3 

} 4 



(with Public 
Speaking) 



French 1 
German 1 
General Science 
Bible 1 
Choir 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLE 



Required 
English 3 3 
Algebra 3 \ 
Plane Geometry 2 / 
French 3 or French 1 

or 4 
German 3 or German 1 
Physics 

or *4 
Chemistry 

Physical Training 3 



Electives (4 or 5) 



Frenclr or French 



German or German 
Latin 3 

American History 
Ancient History 
English History 
Choir 



19 



CLASS A — SENIOR 



Required 
English 4 

Trigonometry and 
Solid Geometry 
Physical Training 



Electives (12 or 13) 



4 


French 3 or French 2 


4 


Mech. Drawing 


**3 




French 4 


2 


Chemistry 


*4 


4 


German 3 or German 2 


4 


Physics 


*4 


3 


German 4 


2 


Bible 2 


2 




Latin 4 


5 


Public Speaking 


2 


11 


Spanish 


4 


Harmony 


2 




American History 


4 


Causes of the War 


2 




Ancient History 


5 


Archaeology 






English History 


5 


Choir 






Algebra 4 (Advanced) 


2 







Diplomas are granted to students who secure passing grades in 73 hours, exclusive of 
Physical Training, in either of the courses of study, provided that they pass in all of the work 
assigned to them in the senior year. A schedule of at least 20 hours, exclusive of Physical 
Training, is assigned to all seniors. 

All seniors must report to the Librarian for instruction in the use of the library. 



11 



STATEMENTS OF COURSES 



GREEK 

The first year (Class III) is devoted mainly to forms and the 
most essential principles of syntax. Benner and Smyth's Be- 
ginner's Greek Book is used. To aid the memorizing of inflec- 
tions and vocabularies there are daily exercises, both oral and 
written, enforced by incessant drill. In the third term Xeno- 
phon's Anabasis is begun and the reading extends at least 
through the first three chapters of Book I. 

The second year (Class II) is occupied with Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-IV, sight reading, translation from English 
into Greek, and grammar reviews. Great effort is made to 
secure simple, idiomatic English in both oral and written work. 
Grammar and composition are studied throughout the year 
and occupy a part of every recitation period. 

There is an elective course in the Greek Testament — one 
hour a week — open to both Upper Middlers and Seniors. 

The third year (Class I) is spent mainly in reading selected 
books of the Iliad and the Odyssey. After the dialect is mas- 
tered, more attention is given to the literary side of the poems 
and to the translation of Homer at sight, about 5000 verses 
being read during the year. 

LATIN 

The work of the Junior year consists of thorough drill in the 
essentials of the grammar, and training in methods of study. 
There is constant practice in the writing of Latin. In the spring 
term, Book II of Caesar's Gallic War, or an equivalent amount 
of Latin selections, is read.* 

♦The Junior work is designed for five periods of fifty-three minutes each a week. This 
necessarily implies a larger total of work for the year than that of the average High School. 
Students preparing for the Lower Middle work should take notice of this fact. 



42 



In the Lower Middle year Books I, III, IV, or V of the Gallic 
War, and about ten Lives of Nepos, or an equivalent in selec- 
tions, are read. There is continued study of Latin prose com- 
position and syntax, of word formation, and of method in sight 
translation. 

In the Upper Middle year the course in Cicero aims to render 
the student familiar with the chief characteristics of Cicero's 
oratory, with his life, and with the history and antiquities of 
his time. The work in Latin prose composition is devoted to 
connected narrative based on the text studied. The Catili- 
narian Orations, the Manilian Law, the Archias, the Marcellus, 
and the Milo or de Senectute or Sallust's Catiline are read. 
There is also sight reading. 

In the Senior year poetic diction and prosody receive atten- 
tion and every effort is made to cultivate a sympathetic appre- 
ciation of good literature. Books I- VI of the Mneid, and the 
Bucolics or an equivalent amount from the Metamorphoses of 
Ovid, or Cicero's de Amicitia are read, with additional practice 
in reading at sight. Topics in the private life and customs of 
the Romans are studied. 

FRENCH 

The first year's work in French (Classes III, C, and IV) 
comprises the principles of pronunciation, drill in the funda- 
mentals of grammar including the inflections of the regular and 
the more common irregular verbs, of nouns, of adjectives, of 
participles, of pronouns; the uses of pronouns, the simple uses 
of the conditional and subjunctive, and the elementary rules of 
syntax; abundant easy exercises for oral translation into French, 
and the reading of about two hundred pages of easy French 
prose. The following texts have been used. Kuhn's Reader, 
Super's Reader, Aldrich & Foster's Reader, La Tulipe Noire, 
L'Ete de la Saint-Martin, Sans Famille, and Fraser and Squair 
and Aldrich and Foster Grammars. 

43 



The second-year course of four hours completes the elemen- 
tary course in French and consists of a review of elementary 
grammar and continued work in composition and translation. 
Such texts as Colombo,, La Mere de la Marquise, Le Roi des 
Montagues, Syntax of the French Verb, Comfort's Composition 
have been used. 

The third year covers the work of the college examination 
for Intermediate French. Contes de Daudet, La Dibdcle, Les 
MisSrables, and similar texts furnish material for translation 
and work in composition and grammar is done throughout the 
year. 

The fourth-year work consists of rapid reading and trans- 
lation of selected passages from English authors, with discussion 
of helpful topics in French history and literature as they come 
in the course. This course is for those who have passed the 
College examinations and who wish to continue their work in 
the language. 

GERMAN 

The first year's work in German (Classes III, C, and IV) com- 
prises the principles of pronunciation, drill in the inflection of the 
articles and the commoner nouns, adjectives, pronouns, and 
weak and strong verbs, also in the use of prepositions, the simpler 
uses of the modal auxiliaries, and the elementary rules of syntax 
and word order; abundant easy exercises for translation into 
German; and the translation of about 150 pages of easy German 
prose, such as is contained in Huss's or Nichols's Readers, 
Bierwirth and Herrick's Aehrenlese and Leander's Traumereien. 
In Class IV, Vos's Essentials of German has been used; in 
Classes III and C, Wesselhoeft's Elementary German Grammar, 
and Chiles's German Prose Composition. 

The second-year course which completes the elemen- 
tary work in German, comprises a thorough review of 

44 



elementary grammar, as outlined above, and continued trans- 
lation and composition. Ham and Leonard's German Grammar 
and Collar's First Year German have been used in these classes, 
and texts such as the following have been studied: Riehl's 
Burg Neideck, Rosegger's Das Holzknechthaus, Gerstacker's 
Irrfahrten and Heyse's Das Madchen von Treppi. 

The third year's work prepares for the examination in 
Intermediate German (German B) as set by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Such texts as Freytag's 
Die Journalisten, Heine's Harzreise, Keller's Kleider machen 
Leute, Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans, Wilhelm Tell, and Der 
Dreissigjahrige Krieg III are read and advanced grammar and 
composition are studied throughout the year. Bernstorff's 
Handbook of German Grammar, Ham and Leonard's German 
Grammar, and Pope's composition books have been used in 
this work. 

The fourth-year course of two hours a week consists in 
the rapid reading and discussion of classic and modern 
prose and poetry, readings in the history of German literature, 
and supplementary lectures by the instructor. This course is an 
elective, open to those who have passed the third year's work 
in German or the College Entrance Examination Board's "Ger- 
man B"; also, upon consultation with the instructor, to others 
who can satisfy him of their ability to do the work of the course. 
Students in this class are not recommended for additional 
college credits in German. 

SPANISH 

The first year's work in Spanish (Senior elective) is as follows : — 
(a) thorough drill in the principles of pronunciation ; (b) rules of 
syntax and essentials of Spanish grammar including the inflection 
of verbs (regular and irregular), nouns, adjectives, pronouns, the 
uses of the conditional and subjunctive; (c) abundant easy exer 



45 



cises for translation into Spanish; (d) the translation of two hun- 
dred or more pages of easy Spanish prose, such as is contained 
in Hill's Spanish Tales, Berge-Soler and Hatheway's Reader, 
Morrison's Tres Comedias, Alarcon's Short Stories, Isaacs's 
Maria and Supple's Spanish Reader; grammars such as Hill 
and Ford's, De Vitis's, and Fuentes and Francois's; (e) selec- 
tions from Crawford's Prose Composition and elementary work 
in Spanish correspondence during the final term of the course. 

The second-year course consists of a complete review of 
Spanish grammar and continued work in composition and 
translation. Such texts as El Capitdn Veneno, Jose y Don 
Quijote, Umphrey's Composition have been used. 

ENGLISH 

The work in composition in the Junior year is based on weekly 
themes, written outside of class, — simple narratives and des- 
criptions, and, less often, simple expositions and arguments, — 
on subjects chosen from the student's observation and experi- 
ence, or suggested by his reading and imagination. This work is 
supplemented by frequent themes written in class. Attention 
is given to the correction of common grammatical errors in 
speech and writing, with such consideration of theoretical gram- 
mar as may be involved in explaining the faults in question; 
to the simpler matters of punctuation; to spelling; and to the 
building up of vocabulary. Considerable emphasis is laid on 
reading aloud. The work in literature consists of a somewhat 
close study of several suitable books or selections, chosen 
from English and American literature, — narrative prose and 
poetry, chiefly of the romantic and heroic type, and some 
simple lyric poetry; a more rapid and informal reading, optional 
or required, of a number of books or selections of a similar sort; 
a brief study of the lives of a few of the authors. Among the 
books prescribed are: $2. Ives; Quentin Durward; Nicholas 
Nickleby; Les MisSrables. 

In the teaching of composition in the Lower Middle year the 

46 



general plan of the preceding year is continued, with a somewhat 
higher standard of requirement, the chief object being to secure 
plenty of practice in writing. The study of literature com- 
prises the careful reading of some selected books, and the rapid 
reading of others, as in the Junior year. Among the books 
prescribed are: Richard II; Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; The 
Woman in White; The Moonstone; The Ebb Tide; Gawain and the 
Green Knight. Particular attention is given to oral English, 
each student being required to deliver two carefully prepared 
original speeches each term and to read aloud in the class-room 
as frequently as possible. 

In the Upper Middle year the study of formal rhetoric is 
begun. As many themes as possible are written outside of 
class, and there is considerable writing in the class-room. The 
course in literature includes a careful reading of seven books se- 
lected from the groups prescribed in the list for reading (a) 
in the College Entrance Requirements; the lives of the authors; 
and the rapid reading, optional or required, of as many other 
books as possible. 

In the Senior year the principles of composition-rhetoric 
studied in the preceding year are reviewed with a higher stand- 
ard of requirement in their application to writing. Weekly 
or bi-weekly themes and writing in the class-room are required, 
as in the Upper Middle year. The course in composition gives 
final preparation for the comprehensive examination offered by 
the College Entrance Examination Board. The course in 
literature, which also prepares for this examination, includes 
a rapid reading of some books and a careful study of others; 
the life and times of the chief authors; and as much supple- 
mentary reading as possible. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Public Speaking is taken up as part of the Lower Middle 
English course. 

The work of the Senior year comprises training in the prepara- 

47 



tion and delivery of expositions, argumentative speeches, and 
debates. 

A considerable amount of oral reading is done throughout 
the course. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

In the two curriculum courses the Bible is studied as an 
English classic. Attention is constantly given to the Biblical 
sources of quotations and allusions. The methods and stand- 
ards are those of the other school studies. Each of the courses 
extends through a year, with two recitation periods each week. 

The first course (for Lower Middlers) consists of Old Testa- 
ment Narratives (Nettleton) during the first term, of the 
Synoptic gospels during the second, and of the gospel according 
to St. John and the Book of Acts during the third. 

The second course (for Seniors) covers all the chief narratives 
of the Old Testament during the first two terms, the text-book 
being Sheffield's The Old Testament Narrative, while the third 
is devoted to lectures introductory to the remaining books of 
the Old Testament. 

ALGEBRA 

The study of Algebra is begun in the Junior year in a course 
occupying five hours a week throughout the year. Slaught and 
Lennes' Elementary Algebra is used as a textbook and chapters 
I-XI and XIII-XVIII, omitting imaginary numbers, are 
completed. 

In the Lower Middle year the work of the preceding year 
is continued with four recitations a week during the fall term. 
The subjects to which most attention is given are exponents, 
radicals, and quadratic equations in one unknown. 

The course in Elementary Algebra is completed in the Upper 
Middle year, and includes in that year more difficult work on 
the topics already studied and advance work in ratio and 
proportion, simultaneous quadratic equations, the progressions, 

48 



and the binomial theorem. Five recitations a week during the 
fall term and three during the spring term are held. 

ADVANCED ALGEBRA 

The two-hour Senior course, Algebra 4 , covers the topics in 
Advanced Algebra specified by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board and meets the entrance requirements of all colleges 
and scientific schools. If not offered for admission it may be 
used to secure advanced credit at some colleges. 

GEOMETRY 

Demonstrative Plane Geometry is taken up in the Lower 
Middle year. Four recitations a week during the winter and 
spring terms are given to the subject. In the work of this year 
the chief aim of the instruction is to develop in each student 
the ability to reason clearly and logically. Accuracy, clearness, 
and completeness of statement are insisted upon. To develop 
originality and independence of thought as much time as 
possible (from one-third to one-half) is devoted to the solution 
of exercises of gradually increasing difficulty. The examination 
for admission to the Upper Middle classes tests not only the 
candidate's knowledge of the usual propositions of Books I, II, 
III, and IV, but also his ability to solve exercises of moderate 
difficulty. 

During the Upper Middle year the same objects of instruction 
are sought, a rapid review is taken, Book V is covered, and much 
time (from one-half to three-quarters) is given to work on 
exercises. Five recitations a week during the winter term and 
two during the spring term are allotted to the course. 

In the Senior year Solid Geometry is taught four hours a 
week during the winter term and two hours during the spring 
term. The course meets the entrance requirements of all col- 
leges and scientific schools, and, when not offered for admission, 
may be substituted for Freshman work in the subject. 

49 



PLANE TRIGONOMETRY 
This course, four hours a week during the fall term and two 
hours during the spring term, with Solid Geometry, forms a 
full four-hour course for the Senior year. It meets the entrance 
requirements of all colleges and scientific schools, and may be 
substituted for Freshman work in the subject, if not used toward 
admission. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 
This course consists of six hours a week, throughout the 
Senior year. It includes use of drawing instruments, lettering, 
geometric constructions, orthographic and isometric pro- 
jections, developments, intersections, and working drawings to 
scale from isometric drawings and from original free hand 
sketches of objects. Especial stress is laid on a thorough 
mastering of the fundamentals. The course meets the require- 
ments of the College Entrance Examination Board, and students 
of exceptional ability are given an opportunity to do more 
advanced work in machine drawing. 

PHYSICS 

The instruction in Physics is given by the use of a textbook 
and by practical work in the laboratory. The text is accom- 
panied with numerical examples and by qualitative experiments 
designed to illustrate physical laws and their application to 
practical life. 

Forty or more quantitative laboratory experiments are re- 
quired of each pupil. A careful record of the steps and results 
of these exercises is kept in a note-book which is submitted to 
the instructor for approval. 

CHEMISTRY 
The sections of the class in Chemistry, each meeting four 
times a week, cover the same ground and prepare for the 
entrance examinations in Chemistry of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 



50 



GENERAL SCIENCE 



In two hours a week throughout the year, some half-dozen 
of the greater doctrines of natural science are approached from 
the cultural rather than the technical side, with especial atten- 
tion, on the one hand, to their historical development, and on 
the other, to their relation to every-day phenomena. The 
course is also, in part, a preparation for the more detailed 
studies which follow, and is correlated with the instruction 
in English of its own year. 

ARCHAEOLOGY 

The work of the department is chiefly confined to the United 
States, and research in other subjects than American archaeology 
is not extensively attempted. 

At present the collections number about 96,000 specimens, 
all of which represent the stone age art. 

The publications of the department number seven — Bulletin 
No. 1, on the Exploration of Jacob's Cavern; No. 2, The Gor- 
gets; No. 3, Field Work in Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, Arizona, 
and New Mexico; No. 4, The Exploration of Bushey Cavern and 
the Exploration of Fort Ancient; No. 5, A Study and Descrip- 
tion of the Seven Prehistoric Earthworks found near Andover; 
No. 6, A Study of Hematite Implements found in the United 
States. The Red Paint People of Maine (preliminary paper). 

The Stone Age in North America, a work in two volumes, 
written by the Curator, was published in 1910. 

HISTORY 

Courses are offered in the history of Greece and Rome, 
English history, American history, and in the History of Europe 
since 1862. 



51 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 



All students are required to take some form of exercise during 
the school year. Upon entering the school each boy receives 
a careful physical and medical examination, and a form of 
exercise suited to his peculiar needs is advised. Special atten- 
tion is given to those who lack normal development. The 
school, class, and squad teams give all students an opportunity 
to compete in sports with those of their own relative ability. 
No student is allowed to compete on school teams unless per- 
mission indicating his fitness is received from the Physical 
Director. 

MILITARY TRAINING 

Military training was established as a part of the regular 
curriculum in September, 1917, and discontinued in December, 
1918. It was required of all members of the Senior and Upper 
Middle classes, and of those members of the two lower classes 
who had reached the age of sixteen years. For all others this 
work was voluntary and over five hundred boys enrolled in the 
school regiment. The work during the current year was in 
charge of Lieut. Roy E. Wyatt of the Canadian Expeditionary 
Forces. 

MUSIC 

Opportunity for the study of piano and organ is offered by 
the Director of Music. 

A two-hour course in Harmony has been added to the cur- 
riculum as a regular Senior elective, this course preparing for 
the College Entrance Board Examination. 

Students who sing in the choir, every member having two 
rehearsals a week, are offered one of three forms of compen- 



52 



sation; (a) financial; (b) one athletic cut a week; (c) permission 
to count the choir work as one schedule hour. 

A series of recitals is given in the school chapel on the Wednes- 
day afternoons of the winter term. The series for the year 
1918-1919 consisted of ten organ recitals, seven of which were 
played by visiting organists, and one recital of music for piano 
and organ. 

In addition to the winter term recitals there have been or 
will be given during the year a recital in dedication of the 
newly rebuilt organ by M. Bonnet of Paris, the annual Christ- 
mas recital preceding the Christmas vesper service, a concert 
by the united musical clubs in the chapel, a concert by the 
school orchestra, a Good Friday performance of the music of 
Wagner's Parsifal (piano and organ), a joint performance with 
Bradford Academy of Mendelssohn's Hymn of Praise in cele- 
bration of the Peace, and the annual commencement organ 
recital. 



53 



PRIZES 



The following prizes are offered annually for proficiency in 
the work of the several departments: 

IN ENGLISH 

The Draper Prizes for Selected Declamations, founded in 1866 
by the late Warren F. Draper, of the class of 1843, of Andover. 
Prizes of twenty-five dollars and of fifteen dollars are awarded. 
The competition is open to all students. A preliminary trial 
before a committee is held early in May, the final competitors 
being chosen on the basis of the best rendered selections. 
The fifty-second competition occurred June 12, 1918. 

The Means Prizes for Original Declamations, founded in 1867 
by the late William G. Means, of Boston. Prizes of twenty 
dollars, of twelve dollars, and of eight dollars are awarded. 
Students in any class may compete. Eight are selected for the 
final competition by the judges who later act as a committee 
of award, the prizes being given on the merits of both composi- 
tion and delivery. The fifty-first competition was held May 
17, 1918. 

The Robinson Prizes for Debate, founded in 1896 by the late 

H. S. Robinson, of Andover, are open to three members of the 
Philomathean debating society and a team chosen from the 
school. A prize of thirty dollars is awarded to the representa- 
tives presenting the better argument, irrespective of the merits 
of the question. The twenty -third competition occurred June 

I, 1918. 

The Andrew Potter Prizes, sustained since 1904 by James 
Tracy Potter, of the class of 1890, in memory of his father and 
brother. Two prizes of thirty dollars and twenty dollars 

54 



respectively are offered to those members of the graduating 
class who shall deliver, at the Commencement exercises in June, 
the best essays on assigned subjects. The competition is open 
to Seniors. The fifteenth competition was held June 14, 1918. 

The Schweppe Prizes, sustained by Charles H. Schweppe of 
the class of 1898. Two prizes, one of thirty dollars and one of 
twenty dollars, are awarded for excellence in English, and are 
open to members of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. The 
seventh competition occurred in June, 1918. 

The Goodhue English Prizes, established in 1916 by the family 
of the late Francis A. Goodhue of Andover, in memory of his 
devotion to Phillips Academy. Two prizes are offered, one of 
fifteen dollars and one of ten dollars, for excellence in English 
literature and composition, including the more practical topics 
of elementary rhetoric. The competition is open to members 
of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. 

IN GREEK 

The Joseph Cook Greek Prizes, founded in 1879 by the late 
Joseph Cook, D.D., of the class of 1857. The prizes are fifteen, 
ten, and five dollars respectively. The special topics included 
in the forty-first competition, June, 1920, will be translations 
at sight: 

1. From Homer. 

2. From Attic Greek Prose. 

There will also be questions on Greek literature and antiquities. 

IN LATIN 

The Dove Latin Prizes, sustained from 1880 to 1908 by the 
late George W. W. Dove, of the class of 1853, of Andover, and 
continued by his sons. The prizes of twenty, fifteen, and ten 
dollars are awarded for excellence in Latin and are open to 
Seniors. 



55 



IN THE CLASSICS 



The Valpey Classical Prizes, founded in 1893 by the late Rev. 
Thomas G. Valpey, of the class of 1854. Two prizes of ten 
dollars each are awarded; one for excellence in Latin Composi- 
tion, one for excellence in Greek Composition. The competi- 
tion is open to members of the Upper Middle class. The 
twenty-third competition occurred in June, 1918. 

IN MATHEMATICS 

The Convers Mathematical Prizes, founded in 1897 by the late 
E. B. Convers, Esq., of the class of 1857, of Englewood, N. J. 
Three prizes of twenty dollars, fifteen dollars, and ten dollars 
are awarded for excellence in the mathematics of the Classical 
Department, to be determined by an examination held in May. 

IN PHYSICS 

The Wadsworth Prize, sustained since 1900 by William S. 
Wadsworth, M.D., of the class of 1887, a prize of ten dollars, is 
awarded to that member of the Scientific Department who has 
obtained the highest rank in Physics for the year. 

IN GERMAN 

The Robert Stevenson German Prize, founded in 1904 by Robert 
Stevenson, Jr., of the class of 1896, in memory of his father. A 
prize of twelve dollars is awarded for excellence in German 
composition. The competition is open to Seniors and Upper 
Middlers of both departments. 

The John Aiken German Prizes, two prizes, one of twenty dol- 
lars and one of ten dollars, are sustained by a member of the 
class of 1873 in memory of John Aiken, a member of the Board 
of Trustees from 1845 to 1863. The competition is open to 
Seniors and Upper Middlers of both departments, and the 
examination, based on which the prizes are awarded, will con- 

56 



tain questions on German geography, a specified period of 
German history, the lives and writings of German authors 
previously assigned, and one or more passages of German prose 
or poetry for translation into English. 

IN FRENCH 

The Frederic Holkins Taylor Prize was founded in 1908 by an 
anonymous friend of the class of 1868. A prize of eight dollars 
is awarded for excellence in French conversation or French 
composition. 

IN AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY 

A prize of twenty -five dollars is awarded annually to that 
member of the class in American Archaeology who maintains 
the highest standing in the course. 

IN CHEMISTRY 

The Dalton Prize in Chemistry, a prize of fifty dollars, founded 
in 1915 by Frederick Goodrich Crane, P. A. 1884, is awarded 
annually to that student maintaining the highest rank in 
Chemistry for the year. 

IN HISTORY 

The Snell History Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained 
by Hon. Bertrand H. Snell, of Potsdam, N. Y., for excellence in 
American History, 

The George Lauder Prize was founded in memory of George 
Lauder of the class of P. S. 1897. A prize of fifty dollars is 
awarded for excellence in English History. 

FOR ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

The Butler-Thwing Prize, a prize of fifteen dollars, founded 
by Capt. Francis Butler-Thwing of the class of 1908 is 

57 



awarded annually to that member of the Junior class who has 
secured the highest average in his examinations for entrance 
to the Academy. 

FOR HIGH SCHOLARSHIP 

The Faculty Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by San- 
ford H. E. Freund, P. A. 1897, is awarded annually to that mem- 
ber of the graduating class who has attained the highest general 
average in scholarship. 

IN GENERAL EXCELLENCE 

The Fuller Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by Samuel 
Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, is awarded at his graduation to that 
member of the class who has best exemplified and upheld in 
his work and life at Andover the ideals and traditions of Phillips 
Academy. Only those who have been members of the school 
for at least two full academic years are eligible for this prize. 

The Otis Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained by Joseph 
E. Otis, P. A. 1888, and is awarded to that member of the Senior 
class who, having been a member of the school for at least three 
years, has, in the judgment of the Faculty, shown the greatest 
general improvement. 

The Boston Yale Club Cup is awarded annually by the Yale 
Club of Boston to that member of the Senior class who attains 
the highest proficiency in scholarship and athletics. 

The Federation of Harvard Clubs Prize. The New England 
Federation of Harvard Clubs awards annually to that student 
who is taking the preliminary examination for Harvard College 
and is, in the judgment of the authorities of the Academy, 
best fitted to receive it, a set of books of some standard author. 
In the award excellence in scholarship may be combined with 
either excellence in manly sports or with any example of dis- 
tinguished moral courage or endeavor. 

A number of prize scholarships are awarded each June. The 
conditions governing these awards may be found on pages 37-38. 



58 



AWARD OF PRIZES. 1917-1918 



The Draper 
Prizes 

The Means 
Prizes 



The 

Robinson Prizes 



The 



Andrew Potter Prizes (2 



The 

Schweppe Prizes 
The 

Goodhue Prizes 

The 
Cook Prizes 



The 
Dove Prizes 

The 
Valpey Prizes 



The 

Convers Prizes 
The 

Wadsworth Prize 
The 

Robert Stevenson 
German Prize 

The 
John Aiken 
German Prizes 

The 
Fuller Prize 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 



(1) 
(2) 



Hugh Harding Spencer, Andover. 

Robert Chapman Bates, Bay Shore, L. L, N. Y. 

John Hall Paxton, Chinkiang, China. 
Harry Klock Schauffler, Kansas City, Mo. 
William Edwards Stevenson, Princeton, N. J. 

Harry Klock Schauffler, Kansas City, Mo. 
Arthur Sharrard Kane, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
John Hall Paxton, Chinkiang, China. 

John Hall Paxton, Chinkiang, China. 
Harry Klock Schauffler, Kansas City, Mo. 

Harry Klock Schauffler, Kansas City, Mo. 
John Hall Paxton, Chinkiang, China. 

John Hall Paxton, Chinkiang, China. 
Harry Klock Schauffler, Kansas City, Mo. 

John Hall Paxton, Chinkiang, China. 
Nathaniel Tyler Lane, St. Louis, Mo. 
Leonard North Seymour, Elgin, Neb. 

Donald Cragin, Worcester. 

Porter Stevens Dickinson, Lunenburg. 

Stewart Nichols, Elkhart, Ind. 

Latin — Hing Sung Mok, Hong Kong, China. 
Greek — Spencer Hotchkiss Miller, Meriden, Conn. 
and 

George Ffrost Sawyer, Andover. 

Walter Leland Jones, Newton Centre. 

Donald Cragin, Worcester. 

Carl Ernest Bricken, Lexington, Ky. 

William Rollins Brewster, Andover. 

Ned Bliss Allen, Carbondale, 111. 

Honorable Mention 
Stewart Nichols, Elkhart, Ind. 

Stewart Nichols, Elkhart, Ind. 
Horace Holbrook Dodge, Andover. 

Norman Dodd, South Orange, N. J. 



The 
Otis Prize 



Ernest Nugent May, Boise, Idaho. 



The 

Frederic Holkins 
Taylor Prize 

The American 
Archaeology Prize 

The 
Snell History 
Prize 

The 
George Lauder 
History Prize 

The Dalton 
Chemistry Prize 

The 
Faculty Prize 

The 

Boston Yale Club 
Cup 

The New England 
Federation of 
Harvard Clubs Prize 

The 

Harvard- A ndover 
Scholarships 

The James 
Greenleaf Fuller 
Memorial Scholarship 

The 

Butler -Thwing Prize 



Stewart Nichols, Elkhart, Ind. 



Spencer Hotchkiss Miller, Meriden, Conn. 

Honorable Mention 
Ferris Baldwin Briggs, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Porter Stevens Dickinson, Lunenburg. 

Robert Guthrie Page, Madison, Wis. 

Crawford Fairbanks Failey, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Robert Guthrie Page, Madison, Wis. 

Norman Dodd, South Orange, N. J. 
Robert Martin, Cambridge. 



George Van Siclen Smith, Richmond Hill, L. I., N. Y. 
Robert Martin, Cambridge. 



Herbert Wells Hill, Andover. 
Randolph Hight Perry, Andover. 



60 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS, 1917-1918 



HONORS OF THE FIRST GRADE 

Awarded to those who have no grade lower than 82 and a grade of at least 92 
in half the number of hours. 



Seniors — 



B. Ault 


2 terms 


S. Nichols 


1 term 


P. S. Dickinson 


3 terms 


R. G. Page 


3 terms 


H. A. Haring, Jr. 


1 term 


G. L. Paine, Jr. 


1 term 


B. Haskell, Jr. 


1 term 


J. M. Phillips 


1 term 


N. T. Lane, Jr. 


1 term 


A. L. Russel 


3 terms 


L. N. Seymour 


2 terms 




Upper Middlers — 








P. Woodling 


1 term 






Lower Middlers — 








J. G. Coleman 


2 terms 


J. M. Hopkins 


3 terms 


Juniors — 






C. S. Gage 


2 terms 


R. H. Perry 


1 term 


HONORS OF THE SECOND GRADE 




Awarded to those who h 


ave an average 


of 85 and no grade lower than 72. 


Seniors — 








B. Ault 


1 term 


E. A. Neiley 


3 terms 


L. D. Baker 


3 terms 


S. Nichols 


2 terms 


W. R. Brewster 


2 terms 


G. L. Paine, Jr. 


2 terms 


F. B. Briggs 


2 terms 


J. M. Phillips 


1 term 


D. F. Cameron 


1 term 


W. B. Purinton 


2 terms 


D. Cragin 


1 term 


H. K. Schauffler 


3 terms 


N. Dodd 


1 term 


L. N. Seymour 


1 term 


H. A. Haring, Jr. 


2 terms 


G. V. Smith 


3 terms 


B. Haskell, Jr. 


2 terms 


D. C. Starr 


1 term 


N. T. Lane, Jr. 


2 terms 


J. F. Stearns 


1 term 


S. H. Miller 


2 terms 






Upper Middlers — 








J. W. Borman 


2 terms 


W. L. Jones 


3 terms 


H. T. Brown 


2 terms 


R. Martin 


2 terms 


H. W. Hill 


1 term 


0. M. Whipple 


1 term 


W. R. James 


2 terms 


P. Woodling 


1 term 


Lower Middlers — 






T. L. Bates 


2 terms 


A. L. Johnson, Jr. 


1 term 


R. M. Clough 


1 term 


R. A. Loomis 


1 term 


J. G. Coleman 


1 term 


C. S. Lunt, Jr. 


3 terms 


P. C. Daniels 


3 terms 


S. Vogelgesang 


1 term 


E. F. Hatch 


1 term 




Juniors — 








C. S. Gage 


1 term 


J. W. Sanborn 


2 terms 


R. H. Perry 


2 terms 


H. A. Willard, 2d 


1 term 


S. I. M. Rosenberg 


1 term 







61 



SENIOR HONORS 



Norman Dodd 
Mitchell Gratwick 
William Beattie MacCready 

Bromwell Ault 

William Rollins Brewster 

Ferris Baldwin Briggs 

Bromwell Ault 

Porter Stevens Dickinson 

Norman Dodd 

David Lyman Greene 

William Elligood Mills, Jr. 

Bromwell Ault 



Horace Holbrook Dodge 
Harry Albert Haring, Jr. 
Broderick Haskell, Jr. 
Stewart Nichols 



class of 1918 
Bible 



Chemistry 



English 



French 
Stewart Nichols 
German 



Lowell MacDonald 
Edward Abbott Neiley 
Philip Morris Stearns 



Crawford Fairbanks Failey 
Earl Stanley McColley 
Willard Bates Purinton 



Robert Guthrie Page 
Albert Lacy Russel 
Harry Klock Schauffler 
George Van Siclen Smith 
John Chapman Wilson 



Leland Dyer Baker 



Robert Guthrie Page 
George Lyman Paine, Jr. 
Harold Wendover Walton 



Nathaniel Tyler Lane, Jr. 



Donald Cragin 

Porter Stevens Dickinson 



John Manning Phillips 



Greek 
Leonard North Seymour 
Latin 



John Hall Paxton 



Leonard North Seymour 
Latin Composition 



Harry Albert Haring, Jr. 
Stewart Nichols 



George Van Siclen Smith 



Mathematics, Advanced Algebra 
Bromwell Ault Donald Klopfer 

William Rollins Brewster Albert Lacy Russel 

Harry Klock Schauffler 

Mathematics, Solid Geometry 

Leland Dyer Baker Nathaniel Tyler Lane, Jr. 

Harry Albert Haring, Jr. John Manning Phillips 

Broderick Haskell, Jr. Albert Lacy Russel 



62 



Mathematics, Trigonometry 
Leland Dyer Baker Broderick Haskell, Jr. 

Harry Albert Haring, Jr. 

Albert Lacy Russel 



John Manning Phillips 



William Rollins Brewster 
Ferris Baldwin Briggs 
Robert Alexander Brown, 
Harry Albert Haring, Jr. 



Physics 



Jr. 



Donald Carter Starr 



Broderick Haskell, Jr. 
Edgar Adolph Kahn 
Robert Guthrie Page 
Albert Lacy Russel 



Donald Cragin 

Porter Stevens Dickinson 



Spanish 



Leonard North Seymour 



Sidney Adolph Frenkel 
Edward Abbott Neiley 



Bromwell Ault 
Leland Dyer Baker 
William Rollins Brewster 
Ferris Baldwin Briggs 
Porter Stevens Dickinson 
Norman Dodd 
Harry Albert Haring, Jr. 
Broderick Haskell, Jr. 
Nathaniel Tyler Lane, Jr. 



Cum Laude 



Edward Abbott Neiley 
Stewart Nichols 
Robert Guthrie Page 
George Lyman Paine, Jr. 
John Manning Phillips 
Albert Lacy Russel 
Harry Klock Schauffler 
Leonard North Seymour 
George Van Siclen Smith 



These members of the class of 1918 were elected to membership in the Cum 
Laude Society on the basis of their superior scholarship in all subjects for their 
Senior year. 

This society aims to bestow that recognition upon high scholarship in the 
preparatory sohools which the Phi Beta Kappa Society gives to it in the colleges . 



63 



CLASS OF 1918 



The following students, members of the class of 1918 unless otherwise in- 
dicated, have entered college. 

Amherst — Porter Stevens Dickinson, John Cushing Esty (1919), David 
Lyman Greene, Sewell Arthur Jones, Willard Lawyer McKinstry, Stewart 
Nichols, Robert Ward Osgood, Jr. (1920), Merton Egbert Perry (ex-1919), 
Leonard North Seymour. 

Boston University — Robert Earle Moody. 

Brown University— William Michael Cushman (1919), Scott Dickson 
Libby, Earl Stanley McColley. 

University of California — Clark James Burnham, Jr. (1919), Harold 
Irving Weber. 

University of Chicago — Philip Barton Stull (ex-1919). 

Columbia — Donald Cragin, Walter May dole Higley, Donald Klopfer. 

Cornell — Paul Frederick Moore. 

Dartmouth — Ned Bliss Allen, John Porter Carleton, John Coakley, Eaton 
Leith, Edmund Francis Leland, Jr., William Dewey Mann (1919), Edward 
Leslie Sharp, William Wayne Shirley, Morrill Goodwin Sprague. 

Harvard — Harold Homer Anderson (1920), Arthur Everett Austin, Jr., 
Leland Dyer Baker, William Rollins Brewster, John Fiske Brown, Donald Fiske 
Cameron, Richard Chute, Horace Holbrook Dodge, Mitchell Gratwick, Chailes 
Carroll Griffin, Alfred Thomas Kent, Philip Barker Lord, William Elligood 
Mills, Jr., Singleton Peabody Moorehead, John Kendall Norwood, Merrill 
Francis Norwood, George Lyman Paine, Jr., John Manning Phillips, George 
Childs Rose, Emanuel Jerome Rosenberg, George Van Siclen Smith, Donald 
Carter Starr, John Frye Stearns, Alexander Tison, Jr., George Clapp Vaillant. 

Johns Hopkins University — Richard Minot Wood, (ex-1918). 

Lehigh — Frederick Woolworth Bates (1919). 

University of Maine — Albert Fremont Scamman. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College: — Raymond Wason. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Samuel Batchelder Abbott, 
Otis Clapp Angier, Ferris Baldwin Briggs, Su Sun Chen (1919), Charles Yardley 
Chittick, Lilley Winslow Emerson (1919), William Gray, Jr., George Frederick 
Hamer, Jr., Broderick Haskell, Jr., William Howard Longwell James, Yu Yui 



64 



Antung Kung (1919), Julian Bonsall McFarland, Ernest Nugent May, Francis 
Ring Morgan, Stephen Barton Neiley, William Henry Noyes, George Edward 
Olmstead, Willard Bates Purinton, William Carter Roberson, Nathaniel Oliver 
Robinson, James Henry Rose, James Paul Sullivan (ex-1919), Donald Elbra 
Walch, Ronald Henry Winde, James Greenhalge Wolstenholme (1919). 

University of Michigan — Edgar Adolph Kahn. 

University of Minnesota — Walter Edward Davis. 

Northwestern University — Graham Penfield (1917). 

University of Pennsylvania — Marc Williams Bodine. 

Princeton — Fletcher LeRoy Belt (1919), Albert Curtis Bogert, George Crary 
Bovaird, Jerome Campbell Buck (1919), Donald Kenzie Cameron, Edward 
Hooper Eckfeldt, Jr., Harry Frank, Jr., Thomas Graham (1919), Maurice Henry 
Houseman, Henry Julius Kaltenbach, Jr., William Beattie MacCready, George 
Irwin Mcllwain, William Leverette Morgan, Jr. (1919), Charles Alexander 
Robinson, Jr., William Edwards Stevenson, Charles Grosvenor Webb (1919). 

W t illiams — Paul Brown, Baucus Cronkhite Kellogg, Richmond Lewis, Frank 
Mathias Low (ex-1919), Harry Klock Schauffler, Howard Caswell Smith, Jr. 

University of Wisconsin — Edward Dexter Brown (1919). 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute — Frank Kenneth Newkirk (1919). 

Yale College — James Galbraith Bennett, Carl Ernest Bricken, Robert 
Alexander Brown, Jr., Paul Howard Crane (1917), Albert Hastings Crosby, 
James Milton DeCamp, Jonathan W'alter Edwards (ex-1919), Harry Albert 
Haring, Jr., Richard Hartshorne (1919), Fraser Macpherson Horn, Herbert 
Humphrey, Jr., Arthur Sharrard Kane (1919), Joseph Choate Keefe, Thomas 
Wylie Kinney, Nathaniel Tyler Lane, Jr., Thomas Egery Lunt, Lindsley 
McChesney, Lowell MacDonald, Cargill MacMillan, John Philip Meyer, Spencer 
Hotchkiss Miller, John Arthur Dickinson Miner, Louis Gregg Neville, Jr., 
Robert Guthrie Page, John Hall Paxton, Edward Sidney Rawson, Jr., Henry 
Herschel Schaul, Jr. (1919), Edward Cutter Scheide, Adrian Warren Smith, 
Frederick Merwin Smith, Jr., Frederick Lionel Spencer (1919), George Abram 
Thornton, Richard William Tierney, Jr. (1919), Frederic de Peyster Town- 
send, Jr., Harold Wendover Walton, John Chapman Wilson, Roger Mirick 
Woolley, John Booth Works, Jr. 

Sheffield Scientific School — Bromwell Ault, Clayton Eddy Bailey, Jr., 
Caldwell Baker, Daniel Fisher Brown, Daniel Erwin Coburn, Hobart Fair- 
child Cole, Norman Dodd, Crawford Fairbanks Failey, Arthur Ferguson, 
Kimbark Jeffrey Howell, Edward John Hussey, Thomas Haskins Joyce (1917), 
Howard Brenton MacDonald, Gordon Preston Marshall, Howard Walker 
Marshall, Richard Hayes Meagher, Irving Netcher (1919), James Alexander 
Smith, Jr., Leslie Emery Strobel (1917), Mason Leo Thompson, John Walker 
Wheeler. 



65 



STUDENTS 



CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT 



CLASS I — SENIORS 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Alexander, John, Jr. 


Aurora, III. 


Phillips 11 


Anderson, Robert Emery, Jr. 


Newton Centre 


Day 35 


Atterbury, John Reynolds 


Chicago, III. 


Day 4 


Babin, Elmer Joseph 


East Cleveland, Ohio 


Mr. Chandler's 


Bates, Robert Chapman 


Bay Shore, L. I., N. Y. 


Abbot 6 


Benjamin, John Davidson 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 20 


Bigelow, David Hardwick 


Andover 


7 Locke St. 


Brown, Harvey Templeton 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bartlet 23 


Burnham, Bradford Hinckley 


Cambridge 


Andover 1 


Burroughs, John Hamilton 


Manchester, N. H. 


Draper 6 


Cameron, Arnold Guyot, Jr. 


Princeton, N. J. 


Abbot 8 


Clifford, Paul Ferris 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Taylor 4 


Coggeshall, John 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 29 


Colburn, Dwight Pettee 


Sharon 


Taylor 23 


Cooper, Alan Mills 


Moline, III. Mrs. Wainwright's 


Cornwall, John 


Short Hills, N. J. 


Pemberton 6 


Crosby, Franklin Muzzy, Jr. 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Taylor 4 


Dann, Jesse Chase, Jr. 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Andover 9 


Davis, Ferdinand Hermann 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 31 


Davis, John Kirby 


Brakpan, So. Africa 


Bishop 16 


Davis, Leslie David Newell 


East Norwalk, Conn. 


Day 36 


Day, Huntington Townsend 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 8 


Dole, Charles Minot 


Andover 


34 Phillips St. 


Dow, James Kimball 


North Andover 


Bishop 19 


Duffy, Edward Stephen 


Lawrence 


Abbot 4 


Durant, Thomas Wells 


New York, N. Y. 


Miss Park's 


Eddy, Caleb Francis 


Wellesley Hills 


Bartlet 27 


Elitharp, Howard Ballard 


Watertown, N. Y. 


Bishop 29 


Ellis, John Munn 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Taylor 25 



66 



NAMES RESIDENCES ROOMS 



Flather, John Rogers 


Lowell 


Bartlet 12 


Flptphpr \Tnrton Woodhurv 




Bartlpt fi 

-l Jell L1CL O 


Fnntp Rflv Pnlmpr 


r.Y) nl pmnnn 7v - / 
liy iC ix UUU 9 2.1 ■ u . 


PnilliTia Inn 
X 111111|J3 J 1 1 1 1 


Frpnkpl Sidnpv Adolnh 

X Ai^ULIV^l, tJlUilvV - i 1 1 V_l 1 j / 1 1 


#Z P«*o Tern* 


Bi<5hnn 1? 

XPlollULI 1 X 


Fnllpr Charlps Pplham Grppnoiifrh 


White Plains N Y 

WW It aC X I'UC'iO) XT . X . 


Bartlpt lfi 


Fuller, Samuel Lester, Jr. 


JFifo'te Plains, N. Y. 


Bancroft 9 


Gordon John Stuart 


T1 nynT(\vnllp flnnn 


Bartlpt 10 


Green, Thomas Dudley 


A^w Fork, A r . F. 


Adams 8 


Higgins, Freeman 


Tin&fnn 


Bartlet 20 


Hill Herbert Well* 




Phillins 17 

JL XXXXXXLyO X I 


HuiskaiTlD Rpniflmin Wnnr1«nn 

A.AU-xouaixi|yj jlj^xxjcli mu j T 1 II 11 1^1 ill 


K pnltult Tninn 

iitU/VHIVj Xl/CC/Ui 


Mr. Chandler's 


Hvde. Bruce Porfpr 


W^rf Haven Conn 


Day 14 


Jones, Walter Leland 


Newton Centre 


Day 14 


KanP 1 yflWTPTlPA Tqtyiaq 
xxuuv| 1 1 v 1^ If mxi CP 


Pelham N Y 

X tilt Ultty IT 1 X • 


Mrs Clark's 

J.TXA O » V - 1(11 IV o 


"Kpnnpdv .Tnhn PHwar^ 


/ hth nion r^l ni ti 

tfUlllUlLU X kUWi 


an prr»f t f5 

i^llllV IV.li L 1 ' 


Kimball, Philip Edwin 


Bradford 


Bishop 35 


Linn. Mil man TTai*t Tr 

M-dX ■ 1 ■ 1, — 'illlllilli xXCtl L, (II 1 


Slnufh 7jnYiPSiY>np. Cihin 


Mr Allpn's 

XT-LI • ililVU O 


Lmn, Vincent Bliss 


South Zanesville Ohio 


Mr. Allen's 


LfX^an Snprfrlan 


Sit Jnvp'nh Aifn 


Tavlor 28 


Lyles, Everett Eddy 


Canaan, Conn. 


Bartlet 13 


Marshall, Harry Reinhard 


TV est Haven, Conn. 


Phillips 19 


Martin Rnhprt 


N Pininr) irillp 

11 Pit 14J IIV lllC 


Bartlpt 16 

±J<Xl Lit u IV 


Mok, Hing Sung 


Hong KonQ, China 


Bartlet 28 


M^llllpn .TosPTib Vircnrmis 

iuuiiUU| tH-wCLJll T 11 g 1111 1X3 


J-TnnQf/Yri TpTn9 


iiUfli i u vj 


Owen, John Sabine 2d 


Owen TV is. 


Bishop 27 


0x1 PV RnHpliffp MVirsjp 

, XlalldlUC XTXUloC 


Ppnntmn 
1 icun 1 11 y 


JlV X Cv L/^X 1/ 


Peters Edward WpIU 


TJ nvprhill 

XX HI CI Hill' 


XTJLX O . tf <XV^i\.0\_/XX O 


Powell. Raloh Carr Jr 


Pittsburah Pa 


Day 27 


Richards, John Willis 


JJ±UAtUOUlV w WW (sd • 


Bartlpt 18 

JLX'CtX LlV~!* X W 


Russel, Albert Lacy 


3 aol? $f>7) iy!11p Fin 


Clpmpnt 2 


Sawvpr GporiTP Ffrn^t 


AX. IlLlUL Cf 


Bartlpt 25 

J ^ Cl 1 LIU L lm yJ 


Scammon Gpnrcrp T?ipbnrrl 


Exeter N N 


TVTr Pp^t's 

XTJLX • X \- \- \f o 


Selden, Edward Gillette 




Phillips 1 


Silberman Sidnpv 

fc-iti W4 mail, 1 - 1 v 1 1 1 v v 


C^IpdpI nrifl flhin 


TVTr f^ihfiTifilpr'Q 

XTJlX • v_ XXCVllVJ.lv, X O 


Smith TTavdpn ^pwbnll 


Rvftnln N Y 

U U JJ tlLU f IT . J • 


AnriAVpp Q 

J \ 1 1 V 1 V J V CI %7 


Smith ^Tiitnpv Savncrp 

v 1 in Lll j T 1 llitllCJ ' II ' u \. 




Day 16 


Spear, John Ashcroft 


Amherst 


Taylor 10 


Straut, Charles Barnwell 


Suffern, N. Y. 


Bishop 23 


Thompson, Charles Rose 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 22 


Vaughan, Wayland Farries 


Newton Centre 


Mr. Tower's 



67 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


V ClilJUI.ll; XilUlllciS 


Wniachn 111 

rr CL186KCL, 1 u. 


layior » 


Wnlkpr TTnrnlrl "RnllnrH 

TTdJlSXl. ildlUlil J->d/lld/lU 


Ballardvale 


Ballardvale 


Whipple, Oliver IMayhew 


New Haven, Conn. 


Uartlet lo 


TV lllldlllo, tldlUCO Udh.cl. 


Glastonbury, Conn. 


Dancroit ix 


^Vilson, Ed.wa.rd Converse 


Gloucester 


BUJIKnt, ft 

l^nillips o 


Wilson, Phillips Elder 


Gloucester 


Phillips 6 


Winchester, John Gordon 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 17 




Seniors — 76 




CLASS II — 


UPPER MIDDLERS 






.KfciOlD EiJNl £.» 


ROOMS 


Allabcn, JVIa.rsha.il Champion, Jr. 


i\ ew I OTK, iS . 1 . 


Dartiet y 


Anderson, John Morrissey Paul 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


uay » 


Baldwin, James Todd 


Liiiestnut mu 


Dartiet xu 


Bartlett, Calvin Page 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


Daniel i» 


Bates, Theodore Lewis 


New Haven, Conn. 


Dartiet id 


XJClilid, VJlvJSVClUJl 


Phptirttit Hill 

l_/ flVOLflUL IX til 


Ua,y o 


I < l\ r | V I laTlQ Q "P £i T* 

JJCllt, LsaLlcL Xd.lh.tr 


JXtSUU/llLy 


Dancroit i / 


iJUdl liUldil, UldUKJJU 


Hvi n n £>inrwl i /~\ yi 
jjiULycpuri, \jUiiii. 


PViillirm IS 

A 111111 LIS lO 


Doyie, xiayiora 


Untontown, Pa. 


Tia\T 9f\ 


Diccu, xviciidrci x lumps 


Lynn 


JDlSIlUp O 


DncKeii, r 1 ay ji<rsKine 


Shelbyville, Ky. 


Mr. Peet's 


Broadley, George Harold 


Salem 


Mrs. Farlow's 


JJUU, V_dlvlU 


Catskill, N. Y. Mrs. Wainwright's 


Cabell, Joseph Patterson 


London, England 


Mrs. Jackson's 


V/dXl , J iJU 11 J? US LCI 


East Orange, N. J. 


Draper 1 


Caswell, Frederick Harrison 


Lawrence 


Lawren 90 


Chatman, Joseph Titcomb 


Swampscott 


Bancroft 6 


Childs, Ralph de Someri 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Churchill 2 


Colby, IMarshall Hartranft 


Los Angeles, Cat. 


Miss Carter's 


Coleman, John Guion 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 17 


Colgate, Robert Bangs 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 1 


Conant, Hurst Waterman 


Portland, Me. 


Phillips 2 


Correa, Edgardo Alvarez 


New York, N. Y. 


Pease 9 


Daniels, Paul Clement 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Bartlet 3 


UOlti, ^ilCAd-liUcl »Tcll/HJI» 


Bangor, Me. 


Bishop 33 


T^lnwlincf h Til t~i k~l i n Wr^nnhiirv 

jlJ (J VV 11 Life) X IcLlUSALll T T UWHU Lll V 


Dedham 


Draper 1 


Etheridge, Hugh Pierrepont 


Salem 


Pemberton 5 


Eudy, Harrison 


Louisville, Ky. 


Phillips 8 



68 



NAMES 

Fellows, Woodward 
Ferris, Walter Rockwood, Jr. 
Fine, John Van Antwerp 
Fitch, Louis Henry, Jr. 
Frost, Malcolm Hovenden 
Gray, Burton Payne, Jr. 
Haviland, Roger Brush 
Hebb, Edwin Gordon 
Hilditch, Alan Dudley 
Hunton, Frank 
Jameson, John Denison 
Johnson, Albert Lincoln, Jr. 
Johnson, William W T arner 
Keith, Allen 

Kendall, David Walbridge 
Keyes, Langley Carleton 
Kingman, Joseph Ramsdell, Jr. 
Knapp, Howard Clay 
Kohler, James Pollock, Jr. 
Kurth, William Waters 
Lacey, George Henry Patterson 
Lawton, Richard Sigmund 
Learned, William Hallam 
Ledyard, Augustus Canfield 
Ledyard, Henry, Jr. 
Lincoln, Louis Augustus 
Little, Charles Joseph 
Ludlam, George P, 2d 
Lunt, Clarence Sumner, Jr. 
Macdonald, Allan Houston 
McNary, William Sarsfield, Jr. 
Manning, Birdsall Thomas 
Messinger, Herbert Borchard 
Morse, Daniel Stuart 
Neil, Edward Joseph, Jr. 
Noyes, Harold Beecher 
Otis, Raymond 
Paine, Alfred White 
Parkhurst, Leonard Woods 
Pfaffmann, Karl Slade 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


/1L • 77/ 

Chicago, ILL. 


rJisnop 2u 


oyracv.se, jy.i. 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Princeton, N. J. 


Andover 6 


Newton Centre 


Taylor 1 


Lawrence 


Adams 16 


Newton Centre 


lajior o 


/^/-,, •77,, \T v 

Uloversvtue, £\ . i . 


Day 21 


Bridgton, Me. 


ADDOt 1 / 


Bronxville, N. Y. 


ADDOt 4 


Evanston, III. 


Mrs. Wainwnght's 


Branford, Conn. 


Eaton 5 


a amourg, jy . i . 


Adams 14 


rr„, j _ . at V 

tiuason, jy . i . 


Mrs. L/iarK s 


C'„„, m ,'j AT T 

oummit, jy . J . 


r>artiet zo 


Princeton, N. J. 


Element o 


Winchester 


uay iz 


Minneapolis, Minn. 




Vincennes, Ind. 


rJisnop 7 


tsrooKlyn, i\ . i . 


JtSisnop xo 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Nashville, Tenn. 


Dartiet io 


Chicago, ILL. 


.Bancroft 6 


W atertown, Ar . i . 


rSisnop zy 


Detroit, Mich. 


ADDOt / 


Detroit, M ich. 


ADDOt / 


Mansfield 


Abbot lo 


Evanston, III. 


uay oo 


view lork, jy.i. 


.baton o 


Kochester, jy. i. 


.rnillips 12 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Newton 


Mrs. Clark's 


p„,„J AT V 


Mrs. Holt's 


Kochester, jy. i . 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Lexington, Ky. 


Andover 2 


Methuen 


Adams 3 


1 renton, IS . J . 


Bancroft lo 


iTL • ___ Til 

Chicago, ILL. 


Bartlet 2o 






Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 


Bancroft 4 


Quincy 


Miss Carter's 



69 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


.role, xienry btier, xd 


Hot oyrxngs, V a. 


Day 29 


xruden, Artnur Ji<iiswortn 


n„„„„ mil „„„ at j 

ureen V tUage, IS . J . 


Mrs. Clark s 


Rosenbaum. William Morris 


Woodmere, L. I., N. Y . 


pi,;il' . i(\ 

rnillips 1U 


Scott, Walter David 


r • „ n i„ \t tj 

Lincoln, I\. a. 


Day 28 


Sears, Richard Harvey 


Cambridge 


Bartlet 14 


Sircom, Arthur Rowland 


Maiden 


rSisnop 21 


Stearns, Roger Vinton 


Dunkirk, N. Y . 


laylor lo 


Stevens, Nathaniel, 2d 


rlainjieia, /V. J. 


rJartlet 24 


Stout, Allison Barnard 


Kjhicago, m. 


T\ „ Off 

Day oo 


Tyler, Morns 


New Haven, Conn. 


ADDOt D 


^^arner, Bradford Greenman 


Fairfield, Conn. 


ivirs. v_/iarK s 


Weeks, Joseph 


oaoot, V a. 


Farrar 5 


Wells, George Burnham 


ooutnoriage 


rSisnop 3o 


Whitelock, Otto von Stockhausen 


jy ew i orfc, is . I . 


lucker 5 


Wiley, Lawrence Whittemore 


seattie, wasn. 


layior / 


Winkler, xtobert .bli 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Uisnop s 


wyandt, Dudley xtnoaes 


Abilene, Kan. 


laylor lo 


York, Gordon Follette 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Miss Carter's 


York, Samuel Albert, Jr. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Bartlet 30 


Upper Middlers — 87 




CLASS III- 


LOWER MIDDLERS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Adam, Erskine Scovell 


New Bedford 


Mrs. Dole's 


Brayton, Anthony 


Fall River 


Andover 4 


Butterfield, Henry Wadsworth 


Hollywood, Cal. 


Day 3 


Callahan, George Fred 


Holyoke 


Draper 3 


Chadwick, Harrison 


Winchester 


Hardy o 


Durivan, Thomas Paul 


New London, Conn. 


Miss Park's 


Frohock, Richard Randall 


Milo, Me. 


v^iement iu 


Gleason, John MacArthur 


Manchester, N. H. 


Adams n 


Gray, Donald McPherson 


Newton Centre 


layior o 


Greene, William 


Denver, Colo. 


Day %o 


Grover, Donald Broughton 


West Newbury 


Adams 3 


Hamilton, John Gordon 


Great Neck Station, L. I., 


AT V T"4n it OO 

iv . a . Day »y 


Hammond, Luther Salem, Jr. 


Winnetka, III. 




Hill, John Edward 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Mr. Stott's 


Hills, Edward Hamilton 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bishop 8 



70 



NAMES RESIDENCES ROOMS 



l^illiam Cpoil 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Mr. Stott's 


TTn A r\e*v TTarr»lrl TTpnnpriv 

XX IXiXIXCX 5 IXal U1LI xVCXlllCUj' 


J? nil Til KPT 

X KJLvv £ Ill/Of 


Dav 8 


.Tr»Vi n q .Tnli n 

O L'ilil 3 5 V Willi 


Bavside LINY 


TVTisti (IVippvpr's 

- ' 1 loo V _ 1 1 V_ 1„ V 1 o 


TCpTrrn ^/llfrpH Arthur 


Afethven 

US. VW (• C4-1/ r t< 


Day 9 


Knox, John Andrew 


NdW CcLUCLUTlt CoTtTi, 


Farrar 6 


T,am<ftTi Snnmipl AWhott 


TjOWpII 


TVTiq« lllippvpr's 

lUlOO VllvC V CI a 


MicGee, Norman Schoonmakcr 


Plainfield, N. J. 


Abbot 14 


Marvpl Gordon Simis 

lTlal T Ksl , VJ VI V1VSJ-L k-'llXUfcJ 


Newburgh, N . Y. 


Tavlor 6 

X CbJ XUX \J 


Mathews, Frank Pelletreau 


New York, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Parlcpr AHpti RhsspII .Tr 


Wellesleu Hills 


fTlpmpnt 1 

V 1V-11H, -Lit. X 


Pearson, Alfred Kittredge 


Gardner 


Adams 21 


Perry, Randolph Hight 


Andover 


70 Elm St 

• V X-JXXXX kVI'* 


Randall Stuart Pptpv 


TTnliinltfi 


T?ofpflT 4 

X CLX X Oil TS 


Reach, Charles Dallas 


Freeport, L. I., N. Y. 


Bishop 16 


T?ipp Alan 


Bronklim N Y 


MY Pppt'^ 


Richards, Francis Bui lard, 2d 


Upper Montclair, N . J. 


Pemberton 2 


Rohhins Charlps Hpnrv Darlincrton 


Jr. 






New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Dole's 


Rosenberg, Sidney Isaac Myer 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 3 


Ross Hiram Goodrich 


Sioux Falls So Dak 


Day 15 


Rvan Cvril Cunningham 

xv v exjjL, v t > 111 iiiiiiii i& ucmi 


Freevort LINY 


Tavlor 11 


Sharrptts Thaddpiis Stpvpns .Tr 

kyllUrllVttUy 111UUU1/UO UtV * ^ilO| *7 1 . 


Plainfield N J 


Phillins 12 


Sherman Fdi?ar .Tav 2d 


JVinchester 


AnilTTKI 1/5 
iiuauio xi/ 


Stearns, Charles Deane 


Andover 


6 Chapel Ave. 


Stpvpnson Donald Dav 

Wl/V » VUOVll| l-'"->ll'll | l 3*JGvj 


Princeton N J 


Tavlor 15 

x cxv ii/i l ' > 


Stevenson, Robert, 3d 


Winnetka, 111. 


Clement 7 


Stiliman f~!hnrlp<i Latimpr 

WUlUOUf V- 1 1 < V 1 I ' XJcldlllv-i 


Stnnfhrinrt flnnn 

UUWt/t L/\JI %i, \J\Jlvl%*. 


Williams Hall 

TV lllldLUS XXctll 


Swnrlpnpr .TnVin T^nirfiplrl 


W.nnrtJif/t'n 71] 


Tavlor 

X a, J XUX if 


Van TVyck, George Lee 


Belmont 


Bishop 28 


Webb, Horace Fremont 


Portland, Me. 


Taylor 2 


Wheelock, Frederic Melvin 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Willard, Henry Augustus, 2d 


Washington, D. C. 


Bartlet 7 


Lower Middlers — 46 




CLASS IV — JUNIORS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Ashcraf t, Arle Marion 


Brookline 


Williams Hall 


Babson, George Jay, Jr. 


Leesburg, Va. 


Williams Hall 


Bailey, Morton Stevens 


Eillsboro, N. E. 


Bishop 22 



71 



NAMES 

Baker, William Henry 
Battershill, Allan John 
Bauer, Paul Sherman 
Bishop, Stephen Hunter 
Bond, Joseph Arthur 
Brainard, Ira Fitch, 2d 
Brandman, Harry Schiller 
Brazer, Richard Bird 
Briggs, Walter Lee 
Cadieu, Philip Goodrich 
Carter, Richard Philip 
Case, George Bowen, Jr. 
Chapman, Horatio Campbell, Jr. 
Cheney, Stanley 
Clark, Herbert Sherman, Jr. 
Clark, William Glenn 
Clough, Charles Asa, Jr. 
Cook, Joseph Gould 
Cross, Kent Converse 
Curtis, Benton 
Curtis, Norton 
Cutler, Benjamin Crawford 
Cutler, Howard McKeen 
Cutter, Charles Nelson 
Dederer, Eugene Morgan 
Dewire, Thomas Andrew, Jr. 
Dodge, Ernest Homer 
Dunkle, Robert Johnston, Jr. 
Dunn, Charles Kittredge 
Durant, John 
D'Wolf, Henry Dreyer 
Dwyer, Wilfred Martin 
Dyson, John Chadwick 
Eddy, Winslow 
Emery, Willard, Jr. 
Fabian, Tracy 
Faithf ull, George Edward 
Foote, Alfred Sherman 
Foster, Willard R S 
French, Philip Roland, Jr. 



RESIDENCES BOOMS 



Lynn 


TVTi«« fluff' or 'a 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


L/ynn 


Adams 15 


Newton Centre 


Williams Hall 

T T 11 UdlUa XXdll 


TipnrHtin 


Tticlirvr* T7 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Day 2 


Port .Ternis N Y 


Williams Hall 


Npintnn flp.ntrp 

il PU/wft VC'fC'lffC' 


TTo-frpar fi 
x cti 1 di yJ 


Swampscott 


Mrs. \Vainwri glrt's 


Everett 


I'llao 111 1 J. v, 1JA, 11U O 


A n/lrtvpr 


WpQt Anrlnvpr 

T T V- O it V CI 


Englewood, N.J. 


W'illiams Hall 


Rnnhrnfilt flnnn 


Williams Hall 

T T 1111 Cl 111 O X iclll 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Tl nlnnlfp 

LJ. UvyUn/G 




TViti php iter 


Williams Hall 

T V 1111 Cl 111 o XXdll 


Tisbury 


Williams Hall 


TVest Newton 


Farrar 3 


WiYichprt/lmn 

WW blvKtlWHAJbUHi 


Williams Hall 

f I llllCtl 1 IS XXctll 


(Inrninn N Y 


Woods 6 






A ti // nnpT 


q Ahbot St 


Andover 


9 Abbot St. 


Pnrf) ' nriA A/fp 


Williams Hall 


New York N Y 


lVTr Allpn's 


\j it iiik/i lAxyv 


XXlOXlU|J ox 


JLAJ UUt/lL 


Mts; Holt's 


JLf 1 WL/fX/VVi Ks 


Williams Hall 


T.nrlt TlniiPM Pn 

XJ\J\st\t M-JL \JbU\sl X U - 


f!lpinp'ni' fi 


New York N Y 


XTXX O • VI dJ. Villtl k5 


Bristol, R. I. 


Adams 12 


Geneva, N. Y . 


Pemberton 5 


T .ni ivrpn pp 


T .Q XXTTATl Of* 
±J<% W 1 C11CC 




Bartlpt 27 


Topsfield 


Mr. McCurdy's 


New Haven, Conn. 


Bancroft 7 


Npin Ynrk N Y 
new l urn,, iv . i . 


Williams Hall 

T T LLUdlUo Mall 


Englewood, N. J. 


Phillips Inn 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Churchill 3 


Andover 


276 So. Main St. 



72 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROONS 


uaraner, Hiu^ara Jretit, jr. 


Northampton 


Element, / 


ijilcnnst, rraiiK vvniiam 


Laurel, Miss. 


Adams 4 


Gregg, Gardner William 


Lowell 


i^nurcnin z 


Hales, Kenneth Adair 


New York, N. Y. 


Clement 9 


xiannum, xtoDert rteaa 


Holyoke 


Bancroft 7 


xlatcn, v> linam sproui 


New York, N. Y. Mrs. Wainwright's 


jtieain, xl/Lus 


Worcester 


Mr. Stott's 


Hebert, Theodore Kenneth 


Haverhill 


Williams Hall 


xioimes, xtaipn 3iiiton 


Bradford 


Bishop 17 


Horner, Horace Mansfield 


Chevy Chase, Md. 


Williams Hall 


Hurtado, Manuel 


Mexico City, Mexico 


Woods 5 


Ives, Stanley Hoyt 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bancroft 5 


Jackson, Donald Harrington 


Bath, Me. 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Johnson, Richard \ernon 


Lynn 


Williams Hall 


Judge, John Newton 


TVaterbury, Conn. 


Adams 16 


Knipe, W illiam Andrew 


Ward Hill 


Churchill 2 


Kwong, Alfred Pulling 


Lincheng, North China 


Abbot 15 


Lazarus, Joseph Maurice 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Mr. Chandler's 


Lewis, Whitney Connor 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Adams 17 


JLoeo, rtooert jn,rnest 


New Orleans La. 


Hardy 1 


Look, Allen MacMartin 


TV est Tisbury 


Abbot 9 


McCabe, Edward Francis 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


MacDonald, Harry Alexander 


South Weymouth 


Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Mclnnes, Robert Rodger 


Bath, Me. 


Mrs. Gardner's 


Mahan, Norman hittlesey 


New London Conn. 


^Vlr. Allen's 


Merrick, Lathrop Bennett 


Andover 


West Andover 


ALerrui, xreston Lima 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Churchill 4 


■tinier, vjoraon .Blair 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Adams 17 


Morrill, John Anderson 


Winchester 


Bishop 4 


Morrison, Clarence Edwin, Jr. 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Mulcahy, James Edmund 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 24 


Mulcahy, Paul Emerson 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 24 


Pearce, Arthur Paul, Jr. 


Jamaica Plain 


Miss Carter's 


Price, Kenneth Goodall 


Andover 


5 Avon St. 


Randall, John Freeman 


Portland, Me. 


Williams Hall 


Ransom, Henry Edward MacDonald Gould 






Toronto, Oni., Canada 


Williams Hall 


Reiner, Richard 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Robertson, Robert Stoddart, Jr. 


Paducah, Ky. 


Bancroft 15 


Rogers, Irving Emerson 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 



73 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Rogers, John 


Kennebunk, Me. 


Adams 17 


nusseii, JJonaid 


Lhicago, III. 


Adams 22 


Schumaker, Albert Gailey 


Waterbury, Conn. 


A J 4 

Adams 24 


Sellman, Frank Harwood 


w eiiesiey mils 


Miss Cheever's 


bhalett, Irving Joseph 


New Haven, Conn. 


A IV X. o 

Abbot 8 


Sherrill, Leicester Haydon 


Philadelphia, ra. 


I ay lor 17 


bnultis, Mark, 2d 


Winchester 


Clement 13 


bniirtletr, Merrill, Jr. 


Lancaster, N. H. 


A/T_ T \T„ i > „ 

Mr. L. L». Newton s 


Silver, Henry Mann 


AT**.. V^~l. AT V 

rsew York, rs. i . 


Williams Hall 


Spencer, Donald 


Andover 


yo central ot. 


Stern, Jesse Myron 


Lhestnut tLill 


Williams Jtlall 


Sternbergh, Regis Springer 


Heading, ra. 


Mr. JL. L/. Newton s 


Stevenson, Ineodore Dwignt 


Princeton, N. J. 


Adams 19 


Sullivan, Bernard Augustine 


Andover 


do iviorton st. 


Swan, Clarence Frederick 


Manchester, IS. a. 


Pease 14 


lenney, Utis rilack 


Houlton, Me. 


Mr. McCurdy's 


lurner, jonn Joeimett 


iv orwicn, rs . i . 


Mr. Li. Kj. iNewton s 


lutein, Ernest Arthur, Jr. 




Williams Hall 


*Vose, George 


Middington, Me. 


£iaton l 


Wade, Windsor Burt 


Andover 


52 balem bt. 


Wainwrignt, rnilip rJruce 


Andover 


14 scnooi ot. 


Walker, Donald Kimball 


Lynn 


TBTT11?.. .. . r. TT„ 11 

Williams Hall 


W7 11 — A 1 1 \T„1 

Waller, Absalom Nelson 


W ashmgton, If. (J. 


Mr. otott s 


Wasserman, Milton 


at,,_„ V at v 

iveio lorfc, Is . i . 


wmiams nan 


TT7 |^ "EMC- 

Weeks, Jbilie 


oaoot, v a. 


Farrar 5 


Weinberg, Charles Morris 


Greenville, Miss. 


if\DDOt II 


Wells, John Huntmgton 


bayettevule, rs. i. 


rarrar 4 


Wnitmg, Artnur at. John, Jr. 


Framingham 


i_nurcnui o 


Vyniting, rrancis 


Darien, Conn. 


v^nurcnui it 


wniting, xvoDert xtuda 


Darien, Conn. 


v^nurcmu z 


Wight, rercival Atherton 


Reading 


Abbot 4 


Willson, Stewart Hemingway 


i hompsonvuie, uonn. 


layior in 


Wilmot, INelson rrank 


Hochester, rs. i . 


Miss Hinchcliffe's 


TT7- 1 _ X. Pi 1 T) 

Wilmot, Stanley rope 


Union City, Conn. 


v^nurcniii o 


Wolfe, Jbdwm Moulton 


Loshocton, Ohio 


Jrxuiups xu 


Wood, Cornelius Van Ness 


/ onKers, is . i . 


Clpmpnf 4 

V . 1 C 11 Iv. iJ I T 


Wright, Charles Blossom 


Dedham 


Adams 10 


Yung, Hin Wa 


Hong Kong, China 


Abbot 15 



Juniors — 120 



* Deceased 



74 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT 



CLASS A — SENIORS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Bailey, George Reily 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Bartlet 4 


Bannister, Rowland Higby 


Meriden, Conn. 


Bishop 18 


Bartlett, Jerome 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 23 


Berger, Sherwood Isbell 


Naugatuck, Conn. 


Mr. Johnson's 


Billings, Asa White Kenney, Jr. 


East Orange, N. J. 


Bancroft 10 


Bishop, Leonard Le Valley, Jr. 


Westhampton Beach, L. I., N. Y. 






Andover 6 


Bolton, Kenneth Boxley 


Troy, N. Y. 


Bartlet 2 


Borman, John William 


New York, N. Y. 


Andover 2 


Bowles, Raymond Leland 


Springfield 


Day 33 


Brewster, Morgan Horsfall 


Hartford, Conn. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Brownson, Alfred Gardner 


Springfield 


Day 24 


Carter, William Woodbury, Jr. 


Worcester 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Clement, Franklin Groves 


Chicago, III. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Cummings, Edwin Hunt, Jr. 


North Attleboro 


Bartlet 26 


Doyle, James Sherman 


Mount Vernon, N. Y. 


Mr. Peet's 


Dudley, Robert Parker 


Newtonville 


Day 16 


Finney, Robert 


Summit, N. J. 


Taylor 25 


Flanders, Franklin Addison 


Winchester 


Pease 11 


Flather, Frederick 


Lowell 


Bartlet 12 


Fletcher, Leonidas, Jr. 


Greenville, Miss. 


Phillips 22 


Fresneda, Antonio Manuel 


Camaguey, Cuba 


Pemberton 2 


Guise, Edwin Ray 


Naugatuck, Conn. 


Mr. Peet's 


Hackett, Howard Dickson 


Bolton 


Mr. Peet's 


Hardy, Gelston 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Phillips 21 


Hatch, Everett Franklin 


Andover 


8 Florence St. 


Houghton, Russell Le Roux 


Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y. Bishop 3 


Houk, John Talbott 


Dayton, Ohio 


Bartlet 2 


James, Warner Rutherford 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Phillips 3 


Johnston, John Walter, 2d 


Washington, D. C. 


Day 33 


Kellogg, Baucus Cronkhite 


Glens Falls, N. Y. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Mann, Morgan McMorries, Jr. 


Pelham Manor, N. Y. 


Day 25 


May, William Edward 


Boise, Ida. 


Bancroft 9 


Miles, John Lawrence 


Lexington 


Eaton 6 



75 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Moody, James Alfred 


Cambridge 


Miss Cheever's 


Murdock, Bennet Bronson 


Meriden, Conn. 


Adams 10 


Palmer, Brooks 


Bradford 


Miss Cheever's 


Parker, Charles Stewart 


Meriden, Conn. 


Bishop 5 


Pierce, Edward Gilman 


Bristol, Conn. 


Mr. Allen's 


Pike, Herman Fay- 


Melrose 


Mr. Peet's 


Poor, Leander Holden 


North Bridgton, Me. 


Bancroft 17 


Richards, Thomas Orin 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


remberton 2 


Richmond, Stanford Church 


Stoughton 


Draper 6 


Rumney, Wilford Lawrence 


Naugatuck, Conn. 


Phillips 20 


Schreyer, William Augustus 


Milton, Pa. 


Pemberton 3 


Smith, Charles Jbredenc, Jr. 


Swampscott 


Tji Mi! i n 

Phillips 19 


Spencer, Hugh Harding 


Andover 


Phillips 17 


Spitzmiller, George Edwin 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Taylor 12 


O i T>1 * 1 • t\ jf ♦ 

Stearns, Philip Morris 


Andover 


Phillips Inn 


Stickney, Aipheus Beede, 2d 


Peterboro, (Jnt., Canada 


Taylor 13 


Stout, William Howard 


Fort Scott, Kan. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Swartz, Philip Kinsell 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Eaton 2 


Tappan, Herrick Ogden 


747 T7" 7 747 T7" 

New Forfc, A. F. 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Webster, Walter JNeal 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Whipp, Harold Burton 


raw mver 


Day 2o 


Woodling, Preston 


Lranjord, A.J. 


.rhillips 14 


Wyman, W illiam Frizzell 


Augusta, Me. 


irmiiips 


Young, Francis Little 


Bay City, Mich. 


Phillips 8 


Young, Thomas Herbert, Jr. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Taylor 20 



Seniors — 58 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLERS 



NAMES 


residences 


ROOMS 


Akerley, Elmer Charles 


Reading 


Mr. Allen's 


Anthony, Malcolm Talbot 


NorweU 


Taylor 10 


Ashmun, Frederick Syndey 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Mrs. Clark's 


Atwood, Gordon Ernest 


Whitman 


Bancroft 4 


Bartow, Nevett Steele, Jr. 


South Orange, N. J. 


Bartlet 29 


Blair, Thomas Marshall Howe 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Mrs. Clark's 


Blodgett, Wentworth Putnam 


West Newton 


Bancroft 16 


Bruce, Donald Wainwright 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Burge, John McDonald 


Louisville, Ky. 


Mrs. Clark's 


Burris, Bennett Kendall 


Pittsfield 


Bishop 3 



76 



NAMES 

Cheney, Marvin Chapin 
Clark, Alan Robbins 
Cleveland, Edwin Clarence 
Clough, Robert Morrill 
Comfort, Lowell Rutherford 
Cushing, Harold Wyman 
Davidson, Robert Cooper 
Davis, Ernest Linwood, Jr. 
Dayton, James Richard 
Deuel, Charles Frederick, 2d 
Dexter, Howard Walker, Jr. 
Diaz, Oscar Edward 
Dixon, Charles 
Dow, John Aldrich 
Dunlop, Alexander McCook 
Dupont, Joseph Cyrille, Jr. 
D'Wolf, James Francis 
Farnsworth, Vincent, Jr. 
Feeney, Byron Joseph 
Ferguson, George Wells 
Furlow, Floyd Charles, Jr. 
Gallagher, George Brendan 
Gillette, George Pope 
Gourley, Stuart 
Graham, George Ross 
Greene, Edward McVitty, Jr. 
Hale, Edward Rice 
Hanley, Edward James 
Hansen, Magnus Christian 
Havemeyer, John Frank 
Hayden, George Tynan 
Hersloff, Nils Bror, Jr. 
Hewett, George Hale 
Hock, Norman Frederic 
Holmes, David Blodgett 
Hopkins, Francis W r ayland 
Hopkins, John Milton 
Houk, George Washington 
Howarth, Andrew John 
Hulbert, Fred Marion 



RESIDENCES ROOMS 



Southbridge 


Bartlet 19 


Northampton 


Wv^ Cleric's 

.'11 O . Y^IdllV A 


Webster 


Hardy 3 


Reading 


Phillips 15 


New York, N. Y. 


Dav 27 


Aver 


Draper 5 


CnTfinnnliQ Pn 

\J \J 1 IXC/ LfUb I/O , X CI • 


Tavl nr 27 


Winchester 




Quincy, III. 


Day 13 


A mhpT<ii 

Xi i it : ( t / ov 


Abbot 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


Clement 7 


Guatemala City, Guatemala 


Tli<slirvn 9X 

A > AO 11WU Ar I 


Hiawatha Kan. 


Tavlor 26 


Reading 


Bishop 25 


Chevy Chase, Md. 


Pease 10 


Houma La. 


Day 17 


Bristol, R. I. 


Bishop 15 


WlTtfJlPtiPT 

rr CHlsiLC/OLC'l 


\K\ sn c\x\ X 


A ndover 


Holt St 


Springfield 


Draper 3 


New York N Y 

A T C/ (As X {Jiiis It • J. . 


PpQOp Q 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Miss Park's 


Hartford, Conn. 


BishoD 22 


Wabnn 

rr uvu/t 


A^cllUlA X 


TVnshiTint/Tn 7) d 


Ri'<slinn 22 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Pease 10 


Castine, Me. 


Clement 11 


W r hitman 


Mr. Tower's 


Vejle, Denmark 


Dav 9 


Ardsley-on-Hudson^ N . Y, 


BLshoD 13 


Birmingham, Ala. 


Mr. Peet's 


Nutleu N J 


\fr<» Clark'*! 


V_y KJiAJ 1 LiAJvKJ kJ LJI ( / luo, \y VJLKJ . 


xJctl L1C I 2V 


Pottsm'lle Pa 


Phillirx? 7 

X 111111 3 4 


J anesville TV is. 


Day 26 


Keeseville, N . Y . 


Mr. Tower's 


Morristown, N. J. 


Phillips 4 


Dayton, Ohio 


Pease 9 


Oxford 


Taylor 2 


Everett, Wash. 


Miss Park's 



77 



NAMES 

Jones, Charles Henry, Jr. 

Jones, Walter Mendelson 

Kirkham, Hall 

Kloman, Francis Ray 

Lawrence, George Edward Roberts 

Loomis, Richard Albert 

Lucas, Joseph Wilson, Jr. 

MacPherson, Gardner Blake 

McRae, Arthur Alexander, Jr. 

Maroney, Walter Keif 

Marshall, Roger Denton 

Mayers, Drayton Alexander 

Miller, Edmund Huddleston 

Morgan, Harvey Shepherd 

Mosman, Oliver Clayton, Jr. 

Neelands, Thomas Daniel, Jr. 

Neidlinger, Newell George 

Penfield, Henry Day 

Potter, Wilson, Jr. 

Powers, Thomas Lawrence 

Renfrew, Alan Spaulding 
Rich, Herbert Clarence 
Richmond, Ernest Dalton, Jr. 
Robbins, James Stanton 
Robinson, Willard Marshall Law 
Roblin, John Hopper 
Ryckman, Edmond Baird, Jr. 
Sanders, George Stewart 
Scheide, Philip William 
Searles, Charles Colden 
Smith, Kenneth Baker 
Stevens, Kenneth Hooker 
Strong, Harold Lovell 
Tichnor, Arthur Rudolph 
Tuttle, Thomas Worrall 
Upson, Charles Hiram 
Van Patten, William James, 2d 
Vogelgesang, Shepard 
Weaver, Alan Vigneron 
Wight, Ira Edward, Jr. 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Weston 


rJisnop o 


Upper Montclair, N.J. 


rnulips 16 


Cleveland, Ohio 


■TV- OA 


AT /ton Vnmh A7 V 

jy ew i orie, is . i . 


nuams \j 


Binghamton, N . Y. 


AD DOt io 


Llevelana, Utiw 


Day 18 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




Brookline 


oancroit iu 


Attlebofo 


r>isnop io 


w est M eajora 


Andover 1 


Lynn 


Mrs. Jackson's 


New York, N. Y. 


Clement 12 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


Rochester, N. Y. Mrs. Wainwright's 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Taylor 11 


Plandome, L. L, N. Y. 


Bishop 11 


"Flnstt Ornnne W .7 


JL VlllL'Vl tUU X 


Evanston, III. 


Bishop 28 


Forestville, Conn. 


Mrs. Holt's 


Fargo, N. D. 


IVIr. Tower's 


77 nnprhill 


Tavlor 18 


Lawrence 


Tavlor 5 


Reading 


Bartlet 9 


Naugatuck, Conn. 


Bishop 21 


Cambridge, N. Y. 


Hardy 2 


Watervliet, N. Y. 


Adams 9 


Toronto, Ont, Canada 


Taylor 21 


Dorchester 


Bartlet 1 


Hartford, Conn. 


Day 8 


Chicago, III. 


Bartlet 7 


Montclair, N. J. 


Pease 11 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Bishop 14 


Binghamton, N. Y. 


Abbot 15 


Chestnut Hill 


Day 19 


Naugatuck, Conn. 


Bancroft 18 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 11 


Burlington, Vt. 


Draper 2 


New London, Conn. 


Churchill 6 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 5 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Phillips 1 



78 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Wilde, Nelson Kimball 


Georgetown 


Pease 12 


Wise, John Clift 


Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 


Clement 5 


Young, Leon Henry, Jr. 


Melrose Highlands 


Abbot 5 


Yung, Hin Fun 


Hong Kong, China 


Abbot IS 


Upper Middlers — 94 




CLASS C — 


LOWER MIDDLERS 




NAMES 


RES ID ENC ES 


ROOMS 


Acheson, Edward Campion, Jr. 


Middlctown, Conn. 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Adams, Francis Fiske 


Andover 


8 Morton St. 


Allen, Daniel 


Andover 


56 Bartlet St. 


Annis, Perley Mason 


Stoneham 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Atha, Henry George 


Groton, Co?in. 


Phillips 9 


Billings, Sumner Lund 


Dorchester 


Miss Park's 


Black, George Kelleher 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Boo tli, Howard Mason 


Worcester 


Taylor 22 


Boss, Charles Acors Barns 


New London, Conn. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Bruce, Herbert Thaver 


Boston 


Abbot 4 


Bunting, James Ernest, Jr. 


Flushing, N. Y. 


Taylor 16 


Burns, James Ferguson 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 


Pease 10 


Bush, Fredrick Henry 


Worcester 


Pease 12 


Butler, Richard Albert 


Brookline 


Phillips 9 


Carpv David Hamilton 


Neic Have n Conn. 


Mrs. Holt's 


Carter, Kenneth Cranston 


Chicago, III. 


Bishop 2 


Chapman, Frank Robbins 


Rochester, Mich. 


Day 21 


Chapman, Robert Miller 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Eaton 3 


Clark, Alexander Bierce, Jr. 


Canton, Ohio 


Mr. Peet's 


Cook, William Frederick 


Johannesburg, So. Africa 


Tucker 3 


Copp, Charles Fenton 


Akron, Ohio 


Adams 21 


Cornell, Joseph I 


Nyack, N. Y. 


Hardy 4 


Damon, Russell Lawrence 


Cranford, N. J. 


Mr. Stott's 


Danforth, George Henry, 3d 


Summit, N. J. 


Andover 3 


Danielson, Thomas Baxter 


Danielson, Conn. 


Bancroft 16 


Dickson, Richard Malcolm 


Holyoke 


Bishop 33 


*Early, Hobart Evans 


Medford 


Day 28 


Evans, Thomas 


East Moriches, L. I., N. Y. Eaton 5 


Fairleigh, William Macdonald 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Adams 4 


Fanning, David Greene 


Hingham Centre 


Andover 5 



* Deceased 



79 



NAMES 

Ferguson, Oliver Drayton 
Ferguson, Robert Robertson 
Frank, Gerson Richard 
Fritchman, Harold Dale 
Gage, Charles Stafford 
Gelbach, Kurt Louis 
Grant, Alexander Lamb 
Greene, Franklin Irvine 
Hallett, Hawes Bailey 
Hardy, Frederick Knowlton 
Hayes, Bartlett Harding, Jr. 
Henke, Carl Harry 
Hibbard, Frederick William 
Hill, Charles Morton 
Holway, William Crocker, 2d 
Howard, John Thomas 
Hubbard, Gilbert 
Hunt, Alfred Herbert, Jr. 
Johnson, Thomas 
Jones, David Calhoun 
Jones, Edwin Francis 
Jopp, Charles Selden 
Keith, Glen William 
Kloss, Robert Fitch 
Klous, Ralph 
Kohler, John Michael 
Kohler, W r alter J, Jr. 
Lockwood, Henry Irving 
Loker, Donald Prescott 
McGregor, Gordon 
Mclnnes, Duncan 
MacNeil, Alden Brooks 
MacNeil, Claude Lash 
Mansfield, Norman Lathrop 
Marks, Kenneth Weale 
Marvel, Thomas Stahl 
Megata, Shigeyoshi 
Mills, Grant Brickett 
Moon, James Southworth 
Morrill, Charles Sumner 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


raaucah, Ky. 


Bancroft 15 


Paducah, Ky. 


Bisnop 34 


\T„„„ V~~l. AT V 

New iork, IS. Y . 


Mrs. Clark's 


Indiana, Pa. 


rSisnop lb 


iv ew I OTK, 1\ . I . 


Bartlet 3 


T/^L_ 7. _„ 7V7 J 

Hoooken, IS. J . 


TT 1 t 

Hardy 1 


Andover 


Day 2 


T\ „ /"7„ 7„ 

Denver, Lolo. 


Day 23 


T~nU^~. AT TJ 

Lisbon, IS . a. 


Clement 8 


West Newton 


Williams Mall 


Andover 


Adams 23 


nujjaio, /v. / . 


Day 3 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Uak Park, III. 


Taylor 23 


Machias, Me. 


Abbot lo 


Laiorence 


Lawrence 


Newton Centre 


rJisnop 1 


Color ado springs, Colo. 


Bartlet 30 


Winthrop 


laylor o 


or. Louis, Mo. 


Eaton 4 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Kancroit lz 


Brookline 


Abbot lo 


/"77_ „7„ /~» 7_ 7 

Chelsea, Ukla. 


Draper 2 


Tyrone, Pa. 


uay zv 


Brookline 


Mr. Cnandler s 


oneooygan, Wis. 


Bishop 14 


oneooygan, Wis. 


Adams 7 


South Nor walk, Conn. 


Uay o 


AT j.*_7 

ISatick 


Tucker 3 


a. aver hill 


r>isnop oo 


Bath, Me. 


Adams 2 


/^r„ 77 T> • j AT V 

College Point, IS. i . 


Bishop 27 


College Point, IS . i . 


Disnop 27 


TJnllohrvrn AT TJ 

aiusooro, iv . a. 


Adams 1 


7/ / „. • _ AT V" 

Limira, is . i . 


Jrniliips s 


Newburgh, N. Y. 


uay *i 


Tokyo, Japan 


Miss Park's 


Reading 


Adams 6 


Cranford, N. J. 


Mr. Peet's 


Portland, Me. 


Miss Cheever's 



80 



NAMES 

Morse, Alfred Hudson 

Munger, Robert Louis 

Newman, William Mendell 

Nichols, Barrett Campbell 

Nicola, Oliver Peter, Jr. 

Ogden, James Gordon, Jr. 

Onthank, Pierce 

Orchard, Richard Shuart 

Oromi, Manuel 

Osborne, Stanley deJongh 

Paget, Harold Alan 

Park, Elliott Norwood 

Patterson, Henry Clay, Jr. 

Peckett, Robert Plympton, Jr. 

Place, Herbert Miller 

Preston, Walter Grey, Jr. 

Quarrier, Archie Monroe 

Reed. Dana Leslie 

Richardson, Thomas Peter deQuartel 

Robinson, Sumner Jennings 

Sahler, Carl Philip 

Salinger, Robert Dennison 

Sanborn, John Webster 

Serat, William Seth 

Sherrill, Arthur Miles 

Small, Joseph Thomas 

Snitwongse, Mom Luang Chiew 

Stillman, Edgar Chapman 

Stilwell, Neil Conwell 

Thomas, Albert Cox, Jr. 

Thomas, Charles Norton 

Tice, Dewees Fryer 

Tompkins, Sydney Edward 

Trasel, Edward George, Jr. 

Walker, Basil 

Washburn, Thomas Savier 

Wight, Daniel Ewing 

Willson, Sumner Lord 

Wintersteen, Fredeiic Tobias 

Woodward, Stanley Hillard 

Wraith, William, Jr. 

Zebrock, Louis Stephen, Jr. 



RESIDENCES 

Edgewood, R. I. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Peirce City, Mo. 
Bath, Me. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Crafton, Pa. 
Fitchburg 



ROOMS 

Mrs. Clark's 
Bancroft 11 
Taylor 8 
Mrs. Dole's 
Tucker 1 
Mr. Peet's 
Adams 18 



Pelham Manor, N. Y. Mr. McCurdy's 
Barcelona, Spain Mrs. Gardner's 

Brookline Williams Hall 

New York, N. Y. Williams Hall 

Cranford, N. J. Day 1 

Youngsville, N. Y. Bishop 32 

Franconia, N. E. Bartlet 11 

Cortland, N. Y. Phillips 13 

Omaha, Neb. Draper 3 

Short Hills, N. J. Pemberton 6 

Andover 50 Salem St. 

Germantown, Pa. Day 10 

Wollaston Taylor 14 

Harlingen, N. J. Eaton 2 

Newtonville Tucker 4 

Andover 5 Locke St. 

Kansas City, Mo. Pemberton 1 

Philadelphia, Pa. Taylor 17 

Bath, Me. Adams 2 

Bangkok, Siam Tucker 2 

Troy, N. Y. Woods 7 

Anderson, Ind. Mr. Tower's 

Foxboro Adams 23 

Flushing, N. Y. Mrs. Clark's 

Dorchester Pemberton 3 

New York, N. Y. Day 32 

Philadelphia, Pa. Adams 5 

Amherst, Ohio Adams 22 

Minneapolis, Minn. Adams 13 

St. Louis, Mo. Phillips 8 

Thompsonville, Conn. Phillips 11 

Pottsville, Pa. Tucker 1 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Mrs. Wainwright's 

New York, N. Y. Taylor 9 
Ecatings-on-Eudson, N. Y. Abbot 18 



Lower Middlers — 112 



81 



CLASSIFICATION 



Classical Department — 
Class I — Seniors 
Class II — Upper Middlers 
Class III — Lower Middlers 

Class IV — Juniors 

Scientific Department 
Class A — Seniors 
Class B — Upper Middlers 
Class C — Lower Middlers 



REPRESENTATION 



IMassachusetts 


xusc 


Maryland 


New York 


111 


Texas 


Connecticut 


55 


Washington 


New Jersey 


36 


Alabama 


Pennsylvania 


28 


Nebraska 


Maine 


20 


North Dakota 


Illinois 


20 


South Dakota 


Ohio 


15 


Idaho 


Missouri 


12 


Iowa 


New Hampshire 


11 


Oklahoma 


Kentucky 


7 


Tennessee 


Wisconsin 


6 


Vermont 


Colorado 


5 


South Africa 


District of Columbia 


4 


Canada 


Michigan 


4 


China 


Minnesota 


4 


Cuba 


Virginia 


4 


Denmark 


Kansas 


3 


England 


Mississippi 


3 


Guatemala 


Rhode Island 


3 


Japan 


California 


2 


Mexico 


Florida 


2 


Siam 


Indiana 


2 


Spain 


Louisiana 


2 





Total 



82 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Samuel L. Fuller, 1894 

Walter L. Murphy, 1868 
William P. Sheffield, 1873 
Lewis M. Silver, 1878 
Joseph E. Otis, 1888 
Alfred T. Scbauffler, 1893 
D. Brewer Eddy, 1894 
Reuben J. Goddard, 1898 



George T. Eaton, 1873 
Frederick E. Newton, 1893 
Bernard M. Allen, 1888 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENTS 



STATISTICAL SECRETARY 



SECRETARY 



TREASURER 



New York, N. Y. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Newport, R. I. 
New York, N. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Boston 
Springfield 



Andover 
Andover 
Andover 



Meetings, with a reception and dinner, are held at Andover each year in 
connection with the graduation exercises. The date for 1919 will be June IS. 
It is desired that correspondence regarding membership and information 
concerning past members of the Academy be sent to the Statistical Secretary' 



BOSTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



William B. Stevens, 1861 
Desmond FitzGerald, 1863 
Edward C. Smith, 1871 
Hollis R. Bailey, 1873 
William P. Sheffield, 1873 



PRESIDENT 

Alfred L. Ripley, 1873 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 



Marcus Morton, 1879 
Arthur B. Chapin, 1887 
Arthur D. Coffin, 1889 
Charles H. Wilson, 1893 
♦Frederic W. Tilton 



SECRETARY 

Philip L. Reed, 1902; 248 Summer Street, Boston 

* Deceased 



83 



TREASURER 



Mortimer L. Seabury, 1905 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 
Fred B. Lund, 1884 
Joseph W. Lund, 1886 
Elias B. Bishop, 1889 
Henry W. Beal, 1893 
Raymond M. Crosby, 1893 
Brewer Eddy, 1894 
Frederick B. Greenhalge, 1894 

Robert T. Fisher, 1906 



Stephen E. Young, 1894 
W. F. Merrill, 1895 
Arthur Diinkwater, 1896 
Philip W. Thomson, 1898 
Joseph S. Seabury, 1900 
Howard M. Bartlett, 1902 
F. Abbot Goodhue, 1902 
Philip L. Reed, 1902 



BUFFALO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

C. Pascal Franchot, 1906; New York Telephone Building 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

S. G. Taylor, 1903; Prudential Building 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Eustace Reynolds, 1906; Erie County Bank Building 



CHICAGO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

William T. Bacon, 1902 Robert A. Gardner, 1908 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

James W. Marshall, 1904; Chicago Savings Bank Trust Co. 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

S. Lewis Smith, 1885 Charles A. Otis, 1888 



DETROIT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Charles Moore, 1874 Burns^Henry, 1896 



84 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Kenneth L. Moore, 1910; 169 Van Dyke Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Charles Moore, 1874 C. Hayward Murphy, 1902 

Burns Henry, 1896 Kenneth L. Moore, 1910 

Steuart L. Pittman, 1908 



NEW JERSEY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT SECRETARY 

Forrest F. Dryden, 1889 Albert Frey, 1881; 331 South Orange Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Decker, 1910 Allan M. Hirsh, 1898 

Kinsley Twining, 1897 



NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT 

Francis R. Appleton, 1871 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Tracy H. Harris, 1882 Oliver G. Jennings, 1883 

SECRETARY 

Frank H. Simmons, 1894; 110 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. 



TREASURER 

Frank Dale Warren, 1879; 225 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Frederick W. Wallace, 1884 
Henry J. Fisher, 1892 
G. Ernest Merriam, 1892 
F. Maurice Newton, 1895 



James L. Mills, 1897 
Fred S. Bale, 1902 
Douglas H. Cooke, 1903 
Herbert H. Ramsay, 1905 



NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred E. Weyerhaeuser, 1892 John Crosby, 1886 

85 



SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Edwin White,1902; 93 East 4th Street, St. Paul, Minn. 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Walter L. Murphy, 1868 William S. Wadsworth, 1887 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Horace O. Wells, 1892; Pine Street, west of Broad, Peirce School 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Charles P. Sherman, 1867 Harry B. Hickman, 1894 

George L. Herrick, 1869 *Frederic E. Whitney, 1898 

Seneca Egbert, 1880 Myron E. Fuller, 1907 

Herman V. Ames, 1884 Henry N. Merritt, 1908 

Joseph W. Lucas, 1885 Daniel B. Wentz, 1892 
Sydney Thayer, 1915 



PITTSBURGH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Edward H. Brainard, 1888 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

William H. Rea, 1875 Charles E. Beeson, 1890 

SECRETARY 

Southard Hay, 1898; Bessemer Building 

TREASURER 

James M. Magee, 1895 ; 314 Frick Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Earle R. Marvin, 1893, Chairman 
Charles C. McCord, 1868 
Clinton L. Childs, 1898 



Chauncey O'Neil, 1899 
Charles E. Irwin, 1900 
Turner D. Moorehead, 190. 



ST. LOUIS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred T. Murphy, 1893 Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 

* Deceased 

86 



5 EC BETA ET AND TREASURER 



Sidney R. Overall, 1903; Federal Reserve Bank Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

James E. Allison, ISSo A. Linn Bostwick, 1904 

Walter C. Taylor, ISSo Samuel X. Holliday, 1904 

Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI ASSOCL\TI0N 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Walter D. Wilcox, 1889 J. Breckenridge Bayne, 1900 

TREASURER 

James H. Hopkins, 1901; 1324 16th Street 

SEC RE TART 

Ord Preston, 1S94; 1S22 R St., N.W. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

*George X. McLanahan, 1S92, Chairman 
Hon, Richard Wayne Parker, 18 64 Robert S. Hume, 1894 

Irving H. Dunlap, 1881 Murray A. Cobb, 1S99 

Henry S. Graves, 1888 A. Britton Browne, 1906 

John A. McHhenny, 1888 Robert C. Dove, 1907 

* Deceased 



87 



INDEX 



Subject Page 

Absences 22 

Academy 

Constitution 10-15 

History 10-15 

Location 17 

Administration Offices 31 

Admission 17 

Admission Requirements 17-18 

Algebra 48 

Alumni Association 82 

Athletic fees 24 

Athletic grounds 33 

Bible 48 

Board 27 

Dining Hall 

Private Houses 

Boston Alumni Association 83 

Breakage Deposit 24 

Buffalo Alumni Association 84 

Chapel 32 

Chemistry 50 

Chicago Alumni Association 84 

Classification 21 

Class Officers 21 

Cleveland Alumni Association 84 

Course of Study 39-41 

Cum Laude 63 

Curriculum 39-41 

Detroit Alumni Association 84 

Dining Hall 27 

Diploma Requirements 19 

Dormitories 28-30 

Faculty Houses 29 

Rents 25-26 



88 



Subject Page 

Scholarship Rooms 34 

Williams Hall (for young boys) 28 

Drawing 50 

English 46 

English Bible 48 

Entrance Examinations 20 

Entrance Examination Requirements 18 

Excuses, Out-of -Town 22 

Expenses 23-25 

Faculty 6-8 

Fees, Athletics and Infirmary 24 

Founders of Phillips Academy 4 

French 43 

Furniture in Rooms 25 

General Science 51 

Geometry 49 

Graduation Fee 24 

Greek 42 

Gymnasium 32 

History of Phillips Academy 10-15 

Honor Students (1918-1919) 61 

Infirmary 30 

Infirmary Rates 24 

Latin 42 

List of Students 1918-19 66-81 

Mechanical Drawing 50 

Military Training 52 

Music 52 

New Jersey Alumni Association .85 

New York Alumni Association 85 

Northwestern Alumni Association 85 



89 



Subject Page 

Peabody House 31 

Philadelphia Alumni Association ... 86 

Phillips Academy 10-15 

Its Origin 

Constitution 

Phillips Inn 32 

Physical Training 50 

Physics 52 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association 86 

Preachers 9 

Principals 4 

Prizes 54-58 

Prizes Awarded 1918 59-60 

Public Speaking 47 

Recitation Buildings 30-31 

Religious Exercises 23 

Representation 82 

Scholarship Aid 34 

Self-Help 

Special Room Scholarships 

Scholarship Funds 34-36 

Scholarship Honors 61 

Scholarship Rooms 34 

Science, General 51 

Senior Honors 62 

Spanish 45 

St. Louis Alumni Association 87 

Students, List 1918-19 66-81 

Swimming Pool 32 

Testimonials 17 

Trigonometry 49 

Trustees 5 

Washington Alumni Association 87 

Williams Hall 

Dormitory for Young Boys 28 



90 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND YEAR 



April, 1920 




Andover, Massachusetts 
THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1920 



1920 1921 1921 1922 



s 


M 


\- 


w 


4 


5 


6 


7 


11 


V? 


13 


14 


1.8.19 


20 


•21 


25;26 


27 


28 



3 4j 5, 6 
|10|ll 12 13 14 



16 17 

23|24|25 2G 
30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



6 7 8 
13 14 15 

20^1 22 



21 31 4 
9 10 11 

16|17jl8 
23|24!25 
30 .. 



OCTOBER 



3 


4 5 


6 


10 


ll|l2 


13 


17 


18 19 


20 


24 


25 26 


27 


81 







14:15 16 

21 122' 23 
28 ,29 SO 



NOVEMBER 



..I II 2 31 4' 5 6 
7 8 9110 1112 13 
14 15 1611718 :19 20 
21 22 23|24j25;26 2' 
28,29 30 .... ... 



DECEMBER 



II 21 3 
- 8 9 10111 
18 14 15 16 17 18 



22 '23 24 
29,30 81 



JANUARY 



s 


M 


T 


IM 


T 


F 


S 














1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


BO 


31 













FEBRUARY 



20 21 
27 



41 6 

- 12 
19 











2 


3 4 


5 


6 


■ili 


9 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17|18 


19 


20 


2l!22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 


28 29 


30 



II 2 
8 9 
15 16 

22! 23 



29 30 31 



5 

12 13 
19 20 21 
2« 27 



2 8 
9 10 
16 17 



S M T W T F S 



19 20 
27 



9 10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



••I 1 
7 8 
14 15 

21122 
28;29 



21 3 
9 10 



OCTOBER 



2 

9 
16 
23 
80 311. 



NOVEMBER 



''I 1 

14 15 

21122 



2( 3 
9 10 
16 17 
23 24 



41 5 
11 12 

1819 
25 26 



DECEMBER 



4 5 
11 12 
18 19 



8 7 8 
18 14 15 

20'2122 



21 3 
9 10 
16 17 

23:24 



27|28i29j30|31 



JANUARY 



s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


SO 


31 





















FEBRUARY 



5 
12 

19 20 
26 27 



••! 1 
7 8 
14 15 

21 1 22 
28 .. 



••I 1 
7 8 
14 15 



8 4 5 

101112 
17 

24j25 



6 

13 

18119 20 21 



..I 1 

T 

14 1 15 
22 
28,29 





11 2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


IS 


2ii 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 

















61 7 
18 14 

20 21 



2 8 
9|10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 . 



June 26 



CALENDAR 



1920 



Monday, 8.1+5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 
Tuesday, 8.1+5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 



January 5 
March 25 
April 6 
June 17 

June 18 
June 21 to 26 



June 22 and 23 Tuesday and Wednesday 



Saturday 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for two lower 

classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board Ex- 
aminations 

Entrance examinations in An- 
dover, New York City, Chi- 
cago, and other cities 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



September 11+ 

September 15 

September 16 

November 25 
December 17 



Tuesday, 9.00 a.m. 

Wednesday, 7.1+5 a.m. 

Thursday, 7.1+5 a.m. 

Thursday 
Friday noon 



Chapel, followed by entrance 

examinations 
Exercises begin for two lower 



Exercises begin for two upper 



Thanksgiving recess 
First term ends 



January 5 
March 21+ 
April 1+ 
June 16 

June 17 
June 20 to 25 



June 25 



1921 

Wednesday, 8.1+5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 
Monday, 8.1+5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



June 21 and 22 Tuesday and Wednesday 



Saturday 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for two lower 

classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board ex- 
aminations 

Entrance examinations in An- 
dover, New York City, Chi- 
cago, and other cities 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



3 



FOUNDERS 



Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS Hon. JOHN PHILLIPS. LL.D. 

Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS, Jb. 



Constitution and Deeds of Trust signed 
Board op Trustees organized 
School opened for instruction 
Act of Incorporation passed 
Theological Seminary opened 
Scientific Department opened 
Archaeological Department opened 
Theological Seminary incorporated 
Theological Seminary real estate purchased 



April 21, 1778 
April 28, 1778 
April 30, 1778 
October 4, 1780 
September 28, 1808 
September 27, 1830 
May 1, 1901 
April 16, 1907 
July 1, 1908 



PRINCIPALS 



ELIPHALET PEARSON. LL.D. 1778 — 1786 

EBENEZER PEMBERTON. LL.D. 1786 — 1793 

MARK NEWMAN, A.M. 1795 — 1810 

JOHN ADAMS, LL.D. 1810 — 1833 

OSGOOD JOHNSON, A.M. 1833 — 1837 

SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, LL.D. 1838 — 1871 

FREDERIC W. TILTON, A.M. 1871 — 1873 

CECIL F. P. BANCROFT. Ph.D., LL.D. 1873 — 1901 

ALFRED E. STEARNS. Litt.D.. L.H.D. 1903 — 



4 



i 



TRUSTEES 



PRESIDENT 

ALFRED LAWRENCE RIPLEY, A.M. 
Elected 1902 

CLERK 

ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, Litt. D., L.H.D. 
Elected 1903 

TREASURER 

JAMES COWAN SAWYER, A.B. 
Elected 1900 



♦GEORGE BROWN KNAPP, A.M. 
Elected 1899 

JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D. 
Elected 1899 

CLARENCE MORGAN, A.B. 
Elected 1900 

CLIFFORD HERSCHELL MOORE, Litt.D. 
Elected 1902 

Hon. HENRY LEWIS STIMSON, A.M. 
Elected 1905 

Hon. ELLAS BULLARD BISHOP, A.B. 
Elected 1907 

Hon. JOHN ADAMS AIKEN, LL.D. 
Elected 1908 

FRED TOWSLEY MURPHY, M.D. 
Elected 1908 

JOSEPH PARSONS 
Elected 1910 

FREDERICK GOODRICH CRANE 

Elected 1912 
* Deceased. 



And over 
Andover 

A ND OVER 

Boston 
Cambridge 
Shelburne, Vt. 
Cambridge 
New York City 
Newton Centre 
Greenfield 
Detroit, Mich. 
Lakeville Conn 

D ALTON 



5 



FACULTY 



ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, A.M., Litt.D., L.H.D., Principal 

On the Peter Smith Byers Memorial Foundation 6 Chapel Avenue 

Instructor 1897-1903. Elected Principal 1903 



MATTHEW SCOBY McCURDY, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
GEORGE THOMAS EATON. A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
CHARLES EMERSON STONE, Ph.B. 

Instructor in French 
CHARLES HENRY FORBES, A.M. 

Professor of Latin on the John C. Phillips Foundation 

ARCHIBALD FREEMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in History 
ALLEN ROGERS BENNER, A.B. 

Professor of Greek K 
JAMES CHANDLER GRAHAM, S.B. 

Peabody Instructor in Natural Sciences 

JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 

FREDERICK EDWIN NEWTON, Ph.B. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

CHARLES PEABODY, Ph.D. 

Director of the Department of American 
Archaeology 
WARREN KING MOOREHEAD, A.M. 

Field Director of Archaeological Exploration in New 
England and Curator of the Museum 
LESTER EDWARD LYNDE, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
HORACE MARTIN POYNTER, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
PEIRSON STERLING PAGE, M.D. 

Physical Director and Medical Advisor 
GEORGE WALKER HINMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in Latin 
CECIL KITTREDGE BANCROFT, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin, Principal's Assistant, 
and Registrar 
CHARLES ARTHUR PARMELEE, A.M. 

Instructor in French 



60 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1873 
73 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1880 
158 Main Street 
Appointed 1890 
25 Hidden Road 
Elected 1891 
Phillips 16 
Appointed 1892 
Andover 7 
Elected 1892 
Phillips 5 
Appointed 1892 
Williams Hall 
Appointed 1894 
9 Salem Street 
Appointed 1895 
197 Brattle Street, Cambridge 
Elected 1901 

Hidden Field 
Elected 1901 

195 Main Street 
Appointed 1901 
21 Phillips Street 
Appointed 1902 
193 Main Street 
Appointed 1902 
169 Main Street 
Appointed 1906 
Bartlet 5 
Appointed 1906 

Bartlet 22 
Appointed 1906 



Alt 1 xl U xt VYIxjIxIS IjHiUIN AlxU, A.Xj. 


iv d art let street 


Jminioirtr Ml KtoMtMn 


Annnintprl 1Q07 


Ttf A T? VTT A AT WTWCT HW CT A fFPAT T? CTR 

r>l A rt xv 11 A 31 VV 1IN SLAJ VY S 1 AV^xvJr yjLtXli, S. l.rJ. 


io» Main street 


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r , T?r\T5/^T? T?"D A ATTTT TXT "E v PT?XTr , TJ A AT 
LrrAJitljrxli r xv AIN IvLlIS rxtriiN^xl, A.M. 


ix ocnooi street 


Instructor in German and French 


Appointed 1907 


CJ a TTTA T7 A rrvr»T)T7 T7TTT7CG T3 TT ta 
\sLiA\JlJlii IVlUUxtxli r UliiSS, xH.l». 


TOO Iff-!- Cfunni 

loo Mam street 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1908 


UD T?TAT?X> rr^ V AT A v Tinx/pi? A AT 
r KXiUHiKl^xv MAI UUxV^Hi, A.M. 


rp„. T l^_ TT_H 

laylor Hail 


7n Qfmicff)? in Phnvi/'Q 


Annointpd 1909 


r'TTV IJT?Tl A "DTA A TAV A "R 
LrU I xl 11/1) Alt U HiAlUIN, A.i>. 


x>ancrott o 


7n itminf/yr in \f nihpmntipi 

X VSVVl UUW/ t / 1. ^XX tif/tt //tut 11. o 


ADDointed 1909 


ACW AT TA TnWPR A Tx 
V»o YV AX/U lUVVlVtt, A. 15. 


ox x nniips street 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1910 


T?T>AXTT<f rVT}T?TT?\ T A TX 

rxvAiNxi. U i>Klx!iI\, A.r>. 


Aaams nail 


Instructor in Enalish 


Appointed 1910 


TART PT?TPT)T?TrTT W ATTFTrTTFP A M 

VyiYXVX/ X Xv ± X; U XV 1 v> JX I I ri 1 1 Xyl V^yXlXLiIV, l\ . IVX 


XjcIIOII 1 


Instructor in Music 


Appointed 1912 


T?T-> I7TAT7 1) 1 C WTT T T A AT XT I? A r TfAX T CTHTT A B 

r xtrilJxlfltl^ W1JjL<1AM xlxiiAlUiN S1U11, A. r>. 


/ / uartiet street 


Instructor in English and Public Speaking 


Appointed 1912 


T^TAWTAT TT? XT XT T? V I)T) T?TA7CTT?X> A AT 
rixJVvliN lUiiNlNlld cJlll«VV&lJCilt, A.M. 


8 Judson Road 


Instructor in General Science 


Appointed 1916 


WflWA'RTA WAnCWrtPTTJ r , TJTTT>r , TJ Ptt ta 
V V AltU W AUS VVUltlii L>11 Llt^Xl, X H.U. 


xjisnop w 


Instructor in German 


Appointed 1917 


nnv T7VI7T? TTTTr' CT>T?XTr , T?"R A Tl 
ItU I Vj V rjL\rj 1 1 or li<rs v^Hdt, A. 13. 


Pemberton 4 


Instructor in English 


Aiynointpd 1917 


CVtTV TriTTXTQAAT T?r»T? RT 'CT-J A Tx 
uL I JUillMoU'iN X KJiXlJ Vj oil , A. 15. 


Draper 4 


J n <tiTn oifiT on Frpnnh 

1 'tot / ttttc/f VV# X f C>fCwt 


A irnnintpH 1Q17 


T T^CT 1 !? Tx PTTATxTVG XJT7WTOXT A AT 
liX/iJ X XjXt v^XXiVivLill/O iNHiVvHJIN, A.M. 


34 Salem Street 


Instructor in French and German 


Appointed 1918 


LAWK.hrsCl!i V KUlii, A.M. 


Taylor Hall 


i iLSLruLLur iri n usiAjry 


Appointeu iyio 


rKArMv MAY htMUA, A. is. 


Adams Hall 


TriQtriiftffyT in T n fin 
A. lloli Ulslisr III Xvuit/fc 




HAKOLD CKAWrOKD STEARNS, A.B. 


Bishop 30 


x fu>LruLU/r ifi HiJiy tion 


Appomtea lyio 


tLh/NKY rKhiSION KL.LLEY, A.B. 


Day SO 


i 71 ?i m 1 pinr i n S\T\n rii eh n n si Clov m nm 
X ilsoll UXslAJi lil O^/U/tto/t LlllLl \Jt-riilU.il 


Ar»T4r»in+f>rl 1 Q 1 ft 


WIXFIELD MICHAEL SIDES, S.B. 


Day 7 


Instructor in Drawing and Assistant in Physics 


Appointed 1919 



7 



HERBERT FREEMAN FRASER, 
Instructor in Mathematics 

THOMAS PALM PITRE, A.B. 
Assistant in Chemistry 



A.M. 



FREDERICK JOSEPH DALY, A.B. 

Private Secretary to the Principal 
SARAH LOW FROST 
Librarian 



OTHER OFFICERS 

VIRGIL D. HARRINGTON, A.B. 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 
HENRY S. HOPPER 

Bursar 

FRANK L. QUINBY, Ph.B. 

Secretary of the Bureau of Self-Help 
HARRIET L. ERVING 

Bookkeeper 
MABEL L. JONES 

Secretary to the Principal 
ALICE T. WHITNEY 

Recorder 
MONTVILLE E. PECK 

Assistant to the Physical Director 
ETHEL A. HITCHCOCK 

Assistant in the Superintendent's Office 
ETHEL M. EATON 

Assistant Secretary to the Principal 
ANN S. LESLIE 

Assistant in the Treasurer's Office 
LUCY B. ABBOTT 

Matron at Isham Infirmary 
Mas. C. M. BAILEY 

Matron at Williams Hall 
EUNICE C. LOVE JOY 

Assistant in the Treasurer's Office 
ALEXANDER SUTHERLAND 

Instructor in Boxing and Swimming 
RAY ARTHUR SHEPARD, S.B. 

Assistant to the Physical Director 



43 Salem Street 
Appointed 1919 
Williams Hall 
Appointed 1919 

147 Main Street 
£10 Main Street 



18 Chapel Avenue 

25 Phillips Street 

Hidden Road 

43 Salem Street 

33 Chestnut Street 

61 Bartlet Street 

Bancroft 1 

High Street 

67 Bartlet Street 

24 Brechin Terrace 

Isham Infirmary 

Williams Hall 

21 Lovejoy Road 

Day 19 

Day 15 
Appointed 1919 



S 



ACADEMY PREACHERS, 1919-1920 



Rev, MARKHAM W. STACKPOLE, School Minister. 
Principal ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H. D. 



President CLARENCE A. BARBOUR, D.D. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Rev. NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, D.D. 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Dean CHARLES R. BROWN, D.D. 




New Haven, Conn. 


Rev. HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, D.D. 




New York, N. Y. 


Rev. D. BREWER EDDY 




Boston 


Professor ALBERT PARKER FITCH, D.D. 


Amherst 


Professor HENRY WILDER FOOTE 




Cambridge 


Professor CHARLES H. FORBES 




Andover 


Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, 


D.D. 


Boston 


Bishop EDWIN H. HUGHES, D.D. 




Maiden 


EDWARD H. HUME, M.D. 




Changsha, China 


Headmaster WILLIAM MANN IRVINE, 


LL.D. 


Mercersberg, Pa. 


Rev. ASHLEY D. LEAVITT, D.D. 




Brookline 


Rev. JOHN X. MILLER 




Pasumalai, India 


Rev. ARTHUR W. MOULTON 




Lawrenct 


Rev. JOHN HERMAN RANDALL, D.D. 




New York, N. Y. 


Professor JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D 




Cambridge 


ROBERT E. SPEER, D.D. 




New York, N.Y. 


President J. ROSS STEVENSON, D.D. 




Princeton N. J. 


Rev. EDWARD T. SULLIVAN 




Newton 


President JOHN M. THOMAS, D.D. 




Middlebury Vt. 


Professor HENRY HALLAM TWEEDY 




New Haven, Conn. 


Rev. BENJAMIN A. WILLMOTT 




Boston 



9 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is not a private school, but an endowed 
academy, controlled by a Board of Trustees and administered 
under the written constitution of its founders. By the terms 
of this Constitution, or Deed of Gift, signed April 21, 1778, 
Esquire Samuel Phillips (1715-1790) of North Andover and his 
brother, John Phillips (1719-1795) of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
set aside tracts of about 141 acres on Andover Hill and 200 acres 
in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, together with the sum of 1614 
pounds, as a foundation for a school. This document, outlining 
the broad principles upon which the proposed institution was to 
be conducted, was composed by Esquire Phillips 's son, Samuel 
Phillips, Jr. (1752-1802), with the advice and aid of his friend, 
Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826). Samuel Phillips, Jr. was after- 
wards Judge of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, 
President of the Senate, and Lieutenant-Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Although Judge Phillips derived many of his educational 
theories from the writings of John Locke and from the English 
nonconformist schools with the scheme of which he was familiar, 
his plan was nevertheless highly original. The purpose of the 
academy was specifically stated in the following words : — 

"And, in order to prevent the smallest subversion of the true intent of this 
Foundation, it is again declared, that the first and principal object of this 
Institution is the promotion of true Piety and Virtue; the second, instruction 
in English, Latin, and Greek languages, together with Writing, Arithmetic, 
Music, and the Art of Speaking; the third, practical Geometry, Logic, and 
Geography; and the fourth, such other of the liberal Arts and Sciences, or 
Languages, as opportunity and ability may hereafter admit, and as the Trustees 
shall direct. " 

10 



The chief emphasis was laid on the development of character, 
and the Master was to take pains "to regulate the tempers, to 
enlarge the minds, and form the Morals of the Youth com- 
mitted to his care". It was stipulated, also, that the school 
" shall be ever equally open to youth, of requisite qualifications, 
from every quarter ". The government was placed in the hands 
of a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. In order to prevent 
sectarianism and provincialism, it was specified that a majority 
of the members should be laymen, and that more than half 
must not be residents of the town in which the academy is 
located. The Trustees were hampered by no vexatious or 
trivial restrictions, but were given sole authority over the institu- 
tion. By the provisions of the Act of Incorporation, passed by 
the General Court, October 4, 1780, their number was fixed at 
never more than thirteen or less than seven, and they were 
permitted to possess real estate with an income not exceeding 
five hundred pounds and personal property with an income not 
greater than two thousand pounds. These holding powers have 
since been considerably enlarged by legislative enactments, as 
the school has grown. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Tuesday, April 28, 1778. Of the twelve original members, four 
were members of the Phillips family : Esquire Samuel Phillips, 
John Phillips, William Phillips of Boston, and Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. These men became in turn the first four presidents of the 
Board. The other members, all relatives or close friends of the 
Phillips family, were John Lowell and Oliver Wendell of Boston, 
Rev. Josiah Stearns of Epping, Rev. Elias Smith of Middleton, 
Rev. William Symmes of North Andover, and Rev. Jonathan 
French, Nehemiah Abbot, Esq., and Eliphalet Pearson of 
Andover. 

Phillips School, as it was called until its incorporation, was 
opened for instruction April 30, 1778, in a remodeled carpenter's 
shop on Andover Hill, thirteen pupils being present; before the 
year was over, fifty-two had registered. The first principal was 

11 



Eliphalet Pearson, a stimulating teacher and stern discipli- 
narian, who established high standards of instruction and 
supervision. Shortly before he resigned in 1786 to become a 
professor at Harvard, a new wooden building was erected to 
meet the demands of the rapidly expanding school. Pearson 
was succeeded by Ebenezer Pemberton, a polite and scholarly 
master, who devoted much attention to the manners of his 
pupils. When he left in 1793, he was followed in office by Mark 
Newman, in whose administration the Andover Theological 
Seminary was founded, largely through the efforts of Dr. 
Pearson. This seminary, which was opened September 28, 
1808, was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees 
of Phillips Academy, and remained in Andover almost exactly 
a century. 

The fourth principal, John Adams, who replaced Newman in 
1810, raised the prestige of the school, increased the attendance, 
and enlarged the faculty. He published the first catalogue and 
made the first revision of the curriculum; but his primary interest 
was in the moral welfare of the boys. The second Academy 
building was burned on January 28, 1818, and a new brick, 
colonial edifice, designed by the famous architect Bulfinch, was 
erected within a year; this "classic hall", described in Oliver 
Wendell Holmes 's poem, The School Boy, is now in use as the 
Dining Hall. In 1830 the Teachers' Seminary, a new institu- 
tion made possible by a bequest of His Honor, William Phillips 
(1750-1827) of Boston, was opened in a massive square structure, 
commonly known as the Stone Academy, built for that purpose . 
This Teachers' Seminary, combining the aims of a normal 
school and a scientific school, was the second of its kind in the 
United States. After twelve years of existence with only 
moderate success it was finally, in 1842, merged with Phillips 
Academy as the "English Department", a name which was 
changed in 1892 to a more nearly accurate title, "Scientific 
Department". 

12 



In 1832 John Adams resigned at the age of sixty, and Osgood 
Johnson was elected principal. Unfortunately he died inl837, 
of consumption, in his thirty-fifth year. During his adminis- 
tration the "Commons", dormitories known to so many gene- 
rations of Phillips boys, were built under the direction of 
Samuel Farrar, Esq., Treasurer of the Trustees. 

Samuel H. Taylor, whose reign of thirty-four years was the 
longest in the school history, became principal in 1837. The 
word "reign" is used advisedly, for he was an autocrat, severe 
in his methods of government and prompt to punish offenders. 
"Uncle Sam", as he was familiarly called, was a relentless 
drill-master in the classics and gained a well-deserved repu- 
tation for thoroughness and accuracy. He was a strong and 
vigorous personality, who made an enduring impression on all 
who came under his influence. In 1864 the Stone Academy 
was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by the present Main 
Building, which has since been twice reconstructed. In 1865 
Mr. George Peabody gave $25,000 to found the Peabody 
Instructorship in Natural Sciences, first filled by the late 
William B. Graves. Dr. Taylor, on January 29, 1871, dropped 
dead in the vestibule of the Main Building. For the next 
two years the office of principal was held by Frederic W. Tilton, 
who, however, could do little in that short period. 

The modern era of development began in 1873 with the 
arrival of Cecil F. P. Bancroft, who was principal until his 
death in 1901. Dr. Bancroft, working in a quiet, tactful, but 
persistent way, brought about many needed reforms. He 
first made a complete revision of the curriculum, thus enabling 
the school to meet the entrance requirements of any college, 
classical or scientific, and greatly broadening the range of 
studies. In his effort to gather about himself a larger and 
more efficient body of teachers he was entirely successful. The 
attendance also increased: in 1873 there were 252 pupils; in 
1895 this had grown to 524, and after 1892 it never again 
dropped below 400. Dr. Bancroft also strove to secure additions 

13 



to the plant, especially by providing dormitories in which boys 
could live under the direct supervision of instructors. He was 
aided in this aim by Melville C. Day of the class of 1858, who, 
in 1892, gave $8000 for a new dormitory, Taylor Cottage (now 
Pemberton Cottage), which was the beginning of the present 
extensive system of houses for students. Mr. Day continued 
his gifts, providing in all six dormitories which to-day furnish 
rooms for 168 boys, besides the teachers in charge. At his 
death in 1913 Mr. Day made Phillips Academy his residuary 
legatee. His gifts to the school amount in all to over $800,000. 

On June 5 and 6, 1878, Phillips Academy celebrated its 
centennial anniversary with elaborate exercises, including an 
historical paper by Rev. William E. Park, an oration by Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and 
speeches by Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Gustavus V. Fox, 
and other distinguished men associated with the school. At 
this time a fund of $100,000 was raised, partly for the en- 
dowment of a principalship and a professorship in Latin. 

Dr. Bancroft's period was marked by both progress and 
expansion. He was a man of clear vision and foresight, firm 
will, and shrewd discrimination, who had the good sense to be 
patient until circumstances were favorable for pressing his 
projects. His policy has been maintained by his successor, 
Alfred E. Stearns, during whose administration Phillips 
Academy has grown in material equipment, in numbers, and in 
efficiency. In 1908, when Andover Theological Seminary was 
moved to Cambridge, the Trustees acquired the entire Seminary 
plant on Andover Hill at a cost of $200,000, thus more than 
doubling its property in land and buildings. In 1901 two 
generous benefactors of the school, Mr. R. Singleton Peabody 
of the class of 1857, and his wife, Margaret Peabody, estab- 
lished the Archaeological Department and provided for it a large 
endowment for instruction, publication, and research, and for 
the care and housing of collections in American Archaeology. 

14 



The official installation of Principal Stearns into office happily 
coincided with the celebration of the 125 th anniversary of the 
founding of the school, held on June 16, 1903. The guest of 
honor was His Excellency, Sir Chentung Liang Cheng, Minister 
Plenipotentiary from the Chinese Empire to the United States, 
who was a student at Phillips Academy in 1880 and 1881< At 
the exercises in the new Borden Gymnasium the speakers were 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie, Hon. Robert R. Bishop, Sir Chentung 
Liang Cheng, and Mr. Stearns. On the same day Brothers' 
Field was dedicated with an address from the principal donor, 
Mr. George B. Knapp. 

Concerning the significant developments of recent years, im- 
portant though they are, little need be said here. At his death 
in 1917 Colonel Oliver Hazard Payne, of the class of 1859, be- 
queathed to the academy the sum of $500,000, this being the 
largest single gift yet made to the Trustees. In 1919, at the 
instigation of an alumni committee, a nation-wide campaign for 
a Building and Endowment Fund of $1,500,000 was opened, and 
has resulted in the securing of about $1,600,000. The income of 
two-thirds of this amount will be devoted to the salaries of 
teachers and officers. 

In the World War, Phillips Academy played a distinguished 
part. Its Ambulance Unit, which sailed overseas in April 1917, 
was the first to be sent from any American school, and its bat- 
talion, formed in February, 1917, prepared many young men for 
the army. At least 2400 of its alumni were enrolled in the mili- 
tary or naval service of the United States or its Allies; and 
eighty-seven gave their lives in the cause of their country 7 . A 
Memorial Bell Tower, soon to be erected on Andover Hill, will 
commemorate their loyalty and sacrifice. 

LOCATION 

Andover is a town of eight thousand inhabitants, situated 
on the Portland Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
twenty -three miles north of Boston. 

15 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY is national in its representation and 
democratic in its life and spirit, and is "equally open to youth 
of requisite qualifications from every quarter". It aims to at- 
tract students of serious educational purposes and high moral 
standards. 

The Academy is not a suitable school for boys who are idle, 
insubordinate, or lacking in self-control; nor is it adapted for 
those who require the constant supervision of teachers in the 
preparation of school work. Students who are found to be un- 
able or unwilling to meet the requirements, and those whose 
influence is injurious, must be withdrawn from the school. As 
maturity is not always to be measured by years, the school has 
no specific regulation as to the age of the candidate. In general, 
however, it has been found that boys of fourteen are able to meet 
the responsibilities of life in the Academy. 

The school provides accommodations and surroundings for its 
students which enable them to pass by gradual and natural 
stages from the paternalism of home life to the freedom that 
awaits them in college. Williams Hall, with its close supervision, 
special hours, and home life, offers attractive and helpful 
surroundings to the young boy just leaving home for his school 
career. A natural and progressive development is provided for 
subsequent years in the houses and halls which are in charge of 
married instructors. The regulations which obtain in all 
dormitories are here in force, but there is in them the atmos- 
phere of home. The later life of the dormitories is designed to 
develop a larger sense of responsibility and to prepare for the 
community life of college. Boys in the dormitories are under 
the supervision of instructors and are required to observe fully 
the regulations of the school. In the judgment of the school 
authorities the average boy will secure the best results intel- 
lectually and morally by following out this gradual change in 
residence. 



16 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



The requirements for admission to Phillips Academy consist in 
evidence of good character and of a satisfactory school record. 
The Academy being unable to receive all who apply for admis- 
sion, even when they can meet its minimum requirements, is 
obliged to discriminate among the applicants on the basis of 
their school records. It asks each candidate for admission to 
take certain specified examinations, in part to enable it to dis- 
criminate fairly among the applicants, but chiefly to enable it to 
properly classify those who are admitted. The school record 
already made by an applicant — interpreted to some extent 
by these examinations — determines largely the Academy's 
decision on each applicant. 

Students in the Academy arrange their work in accordance 
with the Course of Study as outlined on pages 40-42. This 
outline exhibits the work which is done each year by a 
student who is neither behind nor ahead of his class in any 
subject. It is not required that all the studies of a student shall 
be in the class in which he is rated; he is permitted to take in- 
dividual subjects below or above that class, if his preparation 
in the prerequisites of those subjects justifies such action. But a 
student ordinarily is not permitted to take courses in one class 
to the exclusion of uncompleted courses in a lower class except in 
subjects continuing through successive years. 

Applicants for admission to any of the three lower classes are 
asked to take entrance examinations set by the Academy on the 
work of such courses in its curriculum as they have completed. 
Each candidate should take the examinations for which his pre- 
vious work fits him, irrespective of the class groups in which the 
subjects are listed below. 



17 



Junior ^° enter as a norma ^ Junior (first-year class) a 

£j candidate must have completed an approved 

grammar school course. He must pass satis- 
factorily examinations (1) in such essentials of formal English 
grammar as are treated in Kittredge and Farley's Concise 
English Grammar (Ginn & Co.), and (2) in the following topics 
of Arithmetic: common and decimal fractions, denominate 
numbers, percentage, interest, and square root. The examina- 
tion in English grammar will be combined with a test in spelling 
and composition. It is strongly recommended that candidates 
for the Junior Class become familiar with the declensions and 
conjugations of either Latin or French before entrance to the 
Academy. 

£ er For those who wish to enter as normal Lower 

, , . 7 „ Middlers the Academy sets papers on the work 

Middle , . . . f • ... . 

Ql ass done in its Junior year as outlined on pages 

40-41. These examinations cover: 

one year's work in Algebra, as described on page 49. 

one year's work in English, as described on page 47. 

one year's work in Latin (including Book II of Caesar's 

Gallic War), as described on page 43. 
one year's work in French (or German), as described on 

pages 44 — 45. 

TJ For those who wish to enter as normal Upper 

, J. , „ Middlers the Academy sets papers on the work 

Middle t „ J , 

Ql ass oi its first two years, as outlined on pages 

40 — 41. These examinations cover: 
*At least one year's work in Algebra (see note below) 

♦Candidates for the Upper Middle Scientific Class should have completed Elementary 
Algebra (Mathematics A, as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board) ana 
should secure credit for this subject at the college for which they are preparing. Those who 
cannot secure this credit should take the Academy's examination covering its first year'. c 
work in Algebra, described on page 49. Candidates who pass that examination study 
Algebra 2 in the Academy. 

Normal candidates for the Upper Middle Classical Class are required to take the Acad- 
emy's examination on its first year's work in Algebra, described on page 49. If the 
candidate can secure credit at college for Elementary Algebra Complete (Mathematics A, 
as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board), he should do so, and the Acad- 
emy's examination in Algebra is waived. 

18 



two years' work in English, as described on page 47. 
two years' work in Latin, as described on pages 43 — 44. 
two years' work in French (or German) as described on 
pages 44 — 45. 

one year's work in German (or French) or Greek, as des- 
cribed on pages 45 — 44 — 43. 

As a substitute for any of its examinations the Academy will 
accept grades of 60% or better obtained on a corresponding 
examination of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
It will also accept credits already established (by examination 
or certificate) at the college for which the candidate is preparing. 
Candidates who have completed a subject which they do not 
wish to continue should obtain credit at college for that sub- 
ject instead of taking the Academy's examination. The 
Academy's examinations are designed to determine a candi- 
date's ability to do further work in a subject and ordinarily do 
not give credit for a subject that is not to be continued. 
Senior Each Upper Middler in the Academy at the 

Classes 6nC ^ °^ ^PP er Middle year takes preliminary 

college examinations. Candidates for admission 
to the Senior Classes, therefore, should secure credit, at the col- 
lege for which they are preparing, for the work of the Acad- 
emy's three lower years or its equivalent. These credits are ob- 
tained by passing college entrance examinations, or, in the case 
of those colleges which admit on the certificate plan, by pres- 
enting to the college such certificates as it requires. 

The Academy occasionally admits to its Senior Class candi- 
dates for admission to college by the so-called "new plan". No 
candidate will be accepted on this basis unless he has completed 
an approved equivalent of the three lower years in the Academy, 
and has made an especially good record in scholarship. He must 
pass entrance examinations set by the Academy in those sub- 
jects already studied which he will continue. 

Students are not admitted to the Senior Class later than the 
beginning of the winter term. 

19 



~ 7 • j% - • Candidates who are admitted to the Academy 
Classification , , #J . . ■ , . 

and secure credits in the ways indicated in the 

preceding paragraphs are rated as 

Juniors, if credited with fewer than 10 hours of the Acad- 
emy's courses; 
Lower Middlers, if credited with 10 to 27 hours; 
Upper Middlers, if credited with 28 to 44 hours; 
Seniors, if credited with 45 hours. 

Procedure ^ n ma ^ n £ application for admission to the 

, . Academy the form in the back of this catalogue 

should be used. It should be filled out care- 
fully and completely and forwarded to the Principal of the 
Academy. Testimonial letters may either accompany it or be 
sent later. 

Certificates of standing in schools formerly attended are 
required. At the close of the school year, in June, the Academy 
sends to these institutions for complete official records of the 
candidates' work. 

Each candidate should take in June such examinations as the 
requirements outlined on pages 18-19 demand. Candidates 
should not count on qualifying by means of September exam- 
inations without definite assurance from the school authorities 
of the possibility of their admission by doing so. The pressure 
for admission in recent years makes such procedure difficult. 
Those who take college examinations or secure certificate credits 
at college should forward official returns to the Academy as 
soon as they are received. 

Present members of the school are allowed first choice in room 
reservations for the following year. Rooms are regularly as- 
signed to admitted applicants about July 1, and in the order in 
whiclr their applications are filed. Space for indicating room 
preference is provided on the admission application form, 

20 



Entrance Phillips Academy entrance examinations for 

_ . A . candidates for the Junior, Lower Middle, and 

Examinations TT ht-iii i j « 1 » j- 

Dates and Upper Middle classes, and new plan candi- 

p/ dates for the Senior class will be held on Tuesday 

and Wednesday, June 22 and 23, 1920. Can- 
didates must register between 9.00 A.M. and 9.30 A.M. at one 
of the following places : 

Andover: Phillips Academy, Graves Hall. 

Chicago: Hurd Hall, Northwestern University Building, 

corner Lake and Dearborn Sts. 
New York: Y. M. C. A. Building, 215 West 23rd St. 
Examinations will be held in other large cities, in June only, 
if the number of candidates in any locality is sufficient. 

On Tuesday, September lit, 1920, examinations will be held at 
9.30 A.M., in Andover only, according to a schedule of rooms 
and hours announced at that time. 

For examinations held in Andover on these regular dates no 
fees are charged. For examinations held outside of Andover and 
for special entrance examinations held at other times than those 
here given a fee of $5.00 is required. 

Specimen examination papers will be supplied upon request, 
o . , No special students, except foreigners, are re- 

n , 7 , ceived in the Junior or Lower Middle year, and 

students . . . . . . . . , 

the Academy makes no provision for special 

students who are not candidates for graduation, or for entrance 

to college, scientific school, or professional school. 

Special courses may be arranged in the Upper Middle and 

Senior years, only at the written request of parents and by 

special Faculty vote. 

Diploma The diploma of the Academy is granted to 

Requirements* students who have secured passing grades 
(a) in all required subjects in the course selected, 

♦These requirements become effective after September 1920. The requirements for 
the school year 1919-1920 are printed in the 1919 catalogue. 

21 



(6) in a sufficient number of the subjects recognized by the 
College Entrance Examination Board to complete a mini- 
mum of 68 hours of the school schedule, 

(c) in all subjects pursued in the senior year. 

r, . J . Written examinations are held in each study at 
Examinations , . , ,, . . . 

least once a term, but the term grading is based 

Promotions ° n ^ e resu ^ ts °f Dotn written examinations and 
daily work. A student who is guilty of dis- 
honesty in an examination may be suspended or dismissed. At 
the close of each term, a report of the student's scholarship 
and attitude towards his work is sent to his parents or guardian. 
Mid-term reports are also sent for all students whose work is 
below the passing grade, 60% and for those who obtain grades 
of 80% and above. 

Q^ ass Each student is assigned to the special care of 

n a member of the Faculty who is known as his 
Class Officer. This officer arranges the sched- 
ule of studies for each member of the class under his charge, 
and recommends such subsequent changes as seem desirable. 

^. . . The entire school is divided into groups of 

Division 

n „ approximately twenty students each. Each 

group is assigned to the special charge of an 
instructor whose duty it is to familiarize himself with the 
previous history and present standing of the several members 
and to serve as their counselor. 



APPOINTMENTS 



7.45 a.m. Morning chapel. 

8.07 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. (Recitation 
Daily 4.07 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. [and study hours. 

Appointments 8.00 p.m. Evening study hours begin. 

10.30 a.m. and 5.15 p.m. Sunday chapel services. 
Wednesday and Saturday afternoons are half -holidays. 



22 



Stud Hour* Students are expected to occupy themselves 
y ■ with their studies or other school work during 

all study hours. 

Every absence of the student from recitation, 
morning chapel, Sunday service, or from his 
room during study hours, must be accounted for. The accumu- 
lation of eight unexcused absences involves suspension from 
school. In all cases of illness, notice must be sent at once to the 
Medical Advisor, who investigates daily all cases reported. 

Special importance is attached to meeting all appointments 
immediately preceding and following vacation and recess periods. 
A failure to meet such appointments must be regarded as a very 
serious offence and may necessitate withdrawal from school. 

Out of town ^ out-of-town excuses must be obtained from 
r, the Principal. On half -holidays and on spe- 

txcuses • i i i- i i j 

cial holidays such excuses are granted occa- 
sionally to those whose school standing is good. The student 
who goes out of town without permission forfeits his connection 
with the school. 

P , . . Students are required to be present at morning 

^ . chapel. The Sunday services in the Chapel 

iLX6TC%S€S a 

and the religious work of the school are in 
charge of the School Minister, who is also the pastor of the 
Academy Church, an undenominational organization. Dis- 
tinguished clergymen are frequently invited to preach to the 
school. Voluntary communion services are held in the Chapel 
during the year. The Society of Inquiry (the Christian Associa- 
tian of the school) holds a voluntary meeting on Sunday 
evening, which is often addressed by an invited speaker. Dur- 
ing the winter term this society maintains a number of volun- 
tary Bible and Discussion Groups led by members of the faculty. 

Upon written request from their parents, students may be 
excused to attend the morning services of the Protestant Epis- 
copal, Baptist, or Roman Catholic churches. 

28 



EXPENSES 



Parents can estimate approximately the expenses of their sons 
at the Academy, and they are particularly requested not to 
furnish money beyond what is necessary for modest expendi- 
tures. Pupils who are supplied with much spending money, 
or who are allowed to incur debts, often accomplish little in 
their studies, and are liable to form habits which require their 
withdrawal from the school. Parents are earnestly requested 
to refuse permission to their sons to contract debts. The 
schedules of the items named below indicate the ordinary cost 
for limited, average, and ample expenditure. 

*Economical Moderate Liberal 

Tuition, $200.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Room, light, and heat, 40.00 175.00 250.00 

Board, 220.00 250.00 350.00 

Athletic charge, 9.00 15.00 15.00 



$469.00 $640.00 $815.00 

*Scholarship boys by earnest endeavor may meet these charges in part or 
in whole. 

T ... n.jj The tuition for the year is $200.00 divided as 
luition Bills follows . thr ee-nfths, or $120.00, payable Oct- 
ober 1; two-fifths, or 80.00, payable on March 1. Each student 
is required to deposit with the Treasurer on entering the school 
the sum of $20.00 to cover breakage and other obligations which 
may be incurred during the school year. The balance remaining 
after such charges have been deducted will be returned. 

An additional charge of $10.00 is made to members of the 
Senior class to cover the expenses of Commencement. A 
rebate of $1.50 from this charge is made if the student fails 
to secure his diploma. Students in Chemistry and Physics 
are charged for the supplies which they use. All bills are mailed 
to parents or guardians, or may be paid in person by the 
students. Class-room privileges will be denied to students 
whose bills are not settled on or before the dates mentioned 
above. As instructors must be engaged and other provisions 

24 



for education must be made by the school authorities for the 
entire year in advance, tuition charges will not be refunded when 
students are suspended, dismissed, or withdrawn during the school 
year. Checks should be drawn in favor of the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy. 

T „ The regular , tuition charge includes an allow- 

Service an ° e °* crecu ^ e d to each student for 

infirmary service, and entitling him to care and 
board — during illness — at the infirmary for a period not to 
exceed seven days during any one school year. Boys who are 
compelled to use the infirmary for longer periods are charged at 
the regular rate of $2.00 a day. Extra charges are made for 
operations and diseases requiring special nursing. At the dis- 
cretion of the Principal, this charge may be remitted in the case 
of scholarship boys. 

ithletic Fee ^ charge of $5.00 a term is made for the 
maintenance of athletics, but for scholarship 
applicants this charge is $3.00 a term which may be paid 
^wholly or in part by the performance of special work assigned 
by the Treasurer. Three-fifths of the total amount of this 
charge is payable October 1st, and two-fifths on March 1st. 
Students are not asked to contribute further to the financial 
support of the various school teams. 

Room Rents Payments for student rooms in the school 
buildings are required as follows: three-fifths 
of the entire yearly rental on or before October 1 ; the remaining 
two-fifths on March 1. A deposit of $25.00, which will be 
credited to the first regular payment of room rent, is required 
when the contract for the room is filed and the assignment 
made. When a room is assigned to a student, his parent or 
guardian agrees by contract to pay the entire rental of the room 
up to the close of the current school year, whether the student con- 
tinues a member of the Academy or not. The right is reserved 
by the Trustees to transfer boys from room to room in the 



school buildings whenever changes seem desirable; such changes, 
however, do not relieve the original occupants from the obliga- 
tion of meeting the entire year's rent unless newcomers are 
secured to fill the vacancies. 

Each room is furnished with a rug, desk, chiffoniere, chairs, 
bed, and bedding. Towels are not included. 

No refund of deposits will be made until the close of books for 
the fiscal year, June 30. 

PRICES OF ROOMS FOR 1920-1921 

SINGLE ROOMS 

$100.00. Andover, Nos. 3, 5; Pease, No. 14; Woods, No. 8; Clement, No. 6. 
$125.00. Churchill, No. 4; Hardy, Nos. 4, 5 
$135.00. Woods, No. 7. 

$150.00. Churchill, No. 6; Clement, Nos. 3, 5, 8: Taylor, Nos. 5, 12, 19, 26; 

Tucker, Nos. 2, 4, 5. 
$160.00. Woods, No. 5. 

$175.00. Bishop, No. 34; Churchill, No. 3; Clement Nos. 4, 7; Day, 
Nos. 15, 34; Farrar, No. 3; Hardy, Nos. 1, -2, 3; Taylor. 
Nos 1. 6, 8, 13, 15. 20, 22, 27 
$200.00. Abbot, Nos. 11, 13, 14; Adams, Nos. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20; 

Bishop, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; 
Clark, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16; Day, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 
11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; Phillips, Nos. 3, 4, 7, 
10, 14, 15, 18, 21; Taylor, Nos. 7, 14, 21, 28. 
$225.00. Clement (private bath), No. 2. 

SINGLE SUITES 

$200.00. Eaton, Nos. 3, 4. 
$225.00. Clement, No. 13. 

$250.00. Adams, Nos. 1, 7, 18, 24; Andover, No. 4; Bartlet, Nos. 4, 10, 11, 14, 
15, 16, 23, 24, 27, 28; Bishop, Nos. 7, 13, 36; Clark, No. 12; 
Day, Nos. 13, 36. 

DOUBLE ROOMS 
$135.00. Abbot, Nos. 4, 5, 7, 16; Farrar, Nos. 4, 6; Pease, Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. 
$150.00. Churchill, Nos. 2, 5; Tucker, No. 3. 
$175.00. Clark, No. 8; Tucker, No. 1. 

DOUBLE SUITES 
$160.00. Abbot, Nos. 6, 15; Farrar, No. 5. 

$175.00. Andover, Nos. 1, 6, 9; Bancroft, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16,. 

18; Draper, Nos. 3, 5, 6; Eaton, Nos. 1, 5, 6; Pemberton, Nos. 1, 
3, 5, 6,; Woods, No. 6. 



26 



$200.00. Adams, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 23; Bartlet, Nos. 1, 2, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 30; Bishop, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 
33, 35; Clark, Nos. 2, 13; Day, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 14, 16,21,23, 
27, 29, 33, 35; Phillips, Nos. 2, 12; Taylor, Nos. 2, 4, 9. 11, 16, 
18, 23, 25. 

$225.00. Phillips, Nos. 1, 8, 11, 13, 19, 22. 
$275.00. Bartlet (private baths) Nos. 7, 20. 



jfo om About twenty "room scholarships" amount- 

<2 i j 7 • ing to approximately $50.00 each are available 
for deserving boys. These scholarships will be 
credited to the regular room charges on the recipients' term 
bills and will be awarded by the Principal to boys whose cir- 
cumstances compel them to keep their expenses at a low average. 

. xt | j The equipment of the Academy includes a 
Dining Hall „ .f . , ' . . T , „ , . , 

well-appointed Dining Hall which accommo- 
dates two hundred and fifty boys. A fixed charge of $4.00 a 
week, payable one term in advance, has been made during the 
year 1919-1920 to cover light, heat, service, and food such as 
soups, vegetables, cereals, bread, butter, milk, coffee, tea, etc. 
Meats, fish, eggs, and desserts are served a la carte at cost and 
are charged against meal-tickets which are sold at $5.00 each. 
The average cost has been about $7.50 a week. 
Private About sixteen private houses in the vicinity of 

Houses ^ G Academy, under license from the Trustees, 

provide board and lodgings for students, 
and no student may occupy any house not thus licensed by the 
school. Some of the houses provide furnished rooms only; 
others provide rooms and board, and some furnish board for 
students rooming in neighboring houses. The price of table 
board is $9.00 and $10.00 a week. Students rooming in private 
families may, if they desire, board at the Dining Hall. The 
price of furnished rooms, including ordinary service, is from 
$3.00 to $6.50 a week. 

As engagements for rooms in private families continue to 
the end of the Academic year, care should be exercised in the 

27 



selection of rooms. Engagements for table board may, on 
suitable notice, be terminated at the close of any term. Ar- 
rangements and payments for room and board in private houses 
must be made with those in charge of the houses. 



SUMMARY OF PAYMENTS 

Tuition: 1st payment, Oct. 1; $120.00 2nd payment, March 1; $80.00 

Athletic Fee: 1st " "1; 9.00 2nd " "1; 6.00 

Room: 1st " "1; three- 2nd " "1; two- 

fifths of total charge. fifths of total charge. 

Deposit: Payable October 1; amount, $20.00. 
Graduation Fee: Payable March 1; amount, $10.00. 
Table Board: Payable one term in advance. 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Williams Hall trough the generosity of Prof. Edward H 
Williams, Jr., of the class of 1868, the school 



ormi ory or ^ -^910 secured possession of a valuable piece of 
property for the housing and care of younger 
boys. The property, comprising several acres, adjoins the Old 
Campus and is within a short distance of the other school 
buildings. 

Williams Hall has attractive accommodations for twenty- 
four boys. The rooms are spacious, light, and airy, and are 
heated with hot water and lighted with electricity. On the 
main floor is a common reading and recreation room. Table 
board is furnished in the building to all occupants of the house. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to provide in this building sur- 
roundings as helpful as possible for the best development of 
young boys, and to this end they have placed it in charge of a 
married instructor. Boys whose work is below standard may 
be required to report at seven-thirty each evening, where they 
work under supervision and are free to consult the resident 
instructor and his assistant in regard to their studies. 



28 



Williams Hall supplies a stepping-stone between the natural 
restrictions of the home and the somewhat freer life of a large 
school. Although the boys who live here have all the advan- 
tages that Phillips Academy offers, they are under somewhat 
closer supervision than is customary throughout the rest of the 
school. For the school year 1920-21 the charge for room and 
board in Williams Hall, not including the regular tuition charge, 
will be $650.00. A limited number of room scholarships are 
awarded annually in this hall. A special circular explaining 
in detail the equipment and arrangements of Williams Hall, 
and containing both interior and exterior views of this building, 
will be furnished on request. 

7 , The school provides for dormitory purposes 

Faculty Houses , , , . , . , A , 

mne nouses formerly occupied as private dwel- 
lings. These houses are suitable for younger boys, especially 
those who are members of the two lower classes. Each house 
is in charge of a resident instructor. The rooms are furnished, 
and the charges include heat, light, and care of the rooms. 

The Abbot House provides accommodations for nineteen 
boys, the Churchill House for seven, the Clark House for sixteen, 
the Clement House for thirteen, the Farrar House for seven, 
the Hardy House for five, the Pease House for nine, the 
Tucker House for seven, and the Woods House for five. 

Dormitories Through the generous gifts of Mr. Melville C. 

Day of the class of 1858, Mr. Warren F. Draper 
of the class of 1843, and a number of citizens of Andover, and by 
the purchase of the property formerly belonging to the Andover 
Theological Seminary, the Academy now possesses thoroughly 
modern dormitories providing at reasonable rates attractive 
accommodations for almost the entire student body. Below is 
given a brief description of these various buildings, and a list 
of the prices of rooms in each will be found on pages 26-27. With 
the exception of some of the Faculty Houses and Williams Hall 



29 



these buildings are of brick. All are furnished, heated by 
steam, lighted by electricity, and equipped with shower-baths 
and the modern sanitary conveniences. Most of the study 
rooms have open fireplaces. Each building or entry is in charge 
of a resident instructor. 

Phillips Hall, erected in 1808, was entirely remodeled in 
1912. It is divided by a fire wall into two separate entries and 
provides accommodations for fourteen boys in each entry. 

Bartlet Hall was erected in 1817 and entirely rebuilt in 1915 . 

This building also is divided by a fire wall into two separate 
entries, and contains both double and single suites, accommo- 
dating twenty-one boys in each entry. 

Pemberton Cottage, erected in 1891, contains five double 
suites. 

Andover Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double 
suites, one single suite, and two single rooms. 

Draper Cottage, erected in 1892, contains five double 
suites. 

Eaton Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double suites 
and two single suites. 

Bancroft Hall, erected in 1900, contains fourteen double 
suites. The building is divided by fire walls into three separate 
entries, each entry accommodating ten boys. 

Day Hall, erected in 1911, contains twelve double suites, two 
single suites, and twenty single rooms. The building is divided 
by a fire wall into two separate entries, each entry accommo- 
dating twenty-three boys. 

Bishop Hall, erected in 1911, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Day Hall and accommodates the same 
number of boys. 

30 



Adams Hall, erected in 1912, is divided into two separate 
entries, each of which, like the Faculty Houses, is in charge of 
a married instructor. Each entry accommodates eighteen boys. 



Taylor Hall, erected in 1913, accommodates eighteen boys 
in each of its two entries and is in charge of two married in- 
structors. 

(For prices of rooms see pages 26-27.) 

Main This recitation building was erected in 1865 

Building and contains twelve recitation rooms. 



Graves Hall 



Graves Hall, devoted to Science, contains in 
addition to the large and well-equipped labora- 
tories for Physics and Chemistry, four recitation rooms, a 
lecture room, and a drafting room. 

_ TT „ Pearson Hall, erected in 1817 and remodeled in 

Pearson Hall , , T . 

1878, is used for recitation purposes. It con- 
tains six large recitation rooms. 

, . This building contains rooms for the collection 

Building °^ ^ e -department °^ Archaeology and a lecture 

Peabody House 



room. 



Peabody House bears the name of the founders 
of the Archaeological department, with the 
funds of which it was erected. The building carries out the 
expressed wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody that their bene- 
faction should promote the social interests of the student body 
as well as further the study of American Archaeology. Quar- 
ters are provided for the Phillips Union and include a well- 
appointed grill, a large and attractive reading room, and a 
memorial room used as an assembly hall for receptions, lectures, 
and meetings of the various organizations of the school. 

SI 



m'j . • - _. Brechin Hall is used for administrative and 
Administration ... ,™ . n , . 

Offices and hbrary purposes. The lower floor contains 
T the offices of the Principal, the Treasurer, 
and the Registrar. A large hall on the upper 
floor is devoted to the library of over ten thousand volumes, 
which is in charge of a trained librarian and is open daily for 
the use of students. 

The Cha el ^ 6 ^apel, erected in 1875 and enlarged in 
1920, provides accommodations for the religious 
exercises of the school. The daily morning chapel exercises 
and the Sunday preaching and vesper services are held in this 
building. The Chapel contains the William Couch Egleston 
memorial organ. 

Borden The ^ ca< ^ em y nas a ^ ar S e gymnasium, com- 

„ . pletely equipped with modern apparatus, and 

Gymnasium . u > ™ • 1 tv , . , 

in charge 01 a Physical Director who is also 

the Medical Advisor. Students of all classes are required to take 
regular gymnasium work. 

n . n . The swimming pool, adjoining the gymnas- 

Swimmmg Pool . . * £ * * i j \ * 

mm, is seventy-nve feet long and thirty leet 

wide, and represents the most modern ideas in swimming pool 
construction. The elaborate filtration plant in the basement of 
the building assures the purity of the water used in the pool. 

The swimming pool was constructed in 1910 with funds se- 
cured entirely by the efforts of the students themselves. 

Philli s Inn sc ^°°^ P ro P er ty includes a well-equipped 

hotel, situated near the centre of the grounds, 
under lease to a manager, and furnishing to parents and friends 
of the school quiet and comfortable accommodations. 

The Isham ^ 6 ^ ca< ^ em y mam tains an infirmary, the gen- 
T - erous gift of Miss Flora E. Isham, whose name 

it bears. The infirmary was completed in 1912, 
is thoroughly modern in all its appointments, and was carefully 

32 



planned under the direction of experts in hospital construction. 
In addition to the general wards, it contains single rooms for 
those requiring special treatment, an operating room, and quart- 
ers for visiting parents. The contagious wards are completely 
separated from the ordinary wards, and at each end of the build- 
ing there is a large sun parlor entirely encased in glass. Boys 
who are sufficiently indisposed to be unable to attend classes 
are sent to the infirmary for proper care. Except when special 
arrangements have been made in advance by parents or guar- 
dians, the following regulations will be observed in the conduct 
of the infirmary. Patients at the infirmary requiring medical 
attention shall call in local physicians approved by the school 
authorities. In cases requiring the attendance of special- 
ists, the best men available in Boston will be called in con- 
sultation. In special emergencies, when operations seem 
necessary and parents cannot be consulted in advance, the 
Principal of the school assumes responsibility for authorizing 
such operations. The Medical Advisor may at any time 
examine and report upon individual cases. 



Athletic Brothers' Field, comprising twenty -three acres, 

Crounds lS m c ^ ose P rox i m ity to the gymnasium and 

contains ample facilities for baseball, foot- 
ball, and track athletics. The Academy possesses other exten- 
sive grounds for various athletic sports, including baseball, 
football, soccer, lacrosse, and tennis. 



S'6 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND ENDOWMENT 



011 i • The sums granted as scholarships vary accord- 

^ ing to the excellence of the boys in their 

studies, a student of the highest rank receiving 
a sum equivalent to the full tuition fee. Every new applicant 
for a scholarship must pay on entering the Academy the sum 
of $50 toward his tuition. This sum is not remitted. At the 
close of each term scholarships are adjusted in accordance 
with the student's record in his studies during that term. Boys 
of limited means who possess scholarly ability and ambition are 
encouraged to apply for admission, and, if admitted, may be 
reasonably sure of financial assistance. 

~ . , Furnished rooms are set apart in various 

„ . . - dormitories for boys who are obliged to keep 

Provision for . . ' . . . ° { 

° h 7 h Tt their expenses within the lowest possible 

limits. A rental of $40 to $50 is charged each 

occupant of these rooms. Choice of room is determined by the 

scholarship rank of the applicant. 

n 1r tt , Ample opportunities are afforded by the Acad- 

S elf Help A i i i • i_ x- e 

emy to scholarship boys to earn a portion ol 

their school charges. Service in the Dining Hall and boarding 
houses enables them to earn their board. Several agencies are 
assigned by the Bureau of Self Help and a number of students 
may earn a portion of the school charges by work in connec- 
tion with the school offices, and in caring for recitation rooms. 
An energetic boy may find various other chances for remunera- 
tive work. 

oii i • The Students' Educational Fund, begun with a 

7 gift of $100 from the Senior Class of 1854, now 

tunas &i „ „™ 

amounts to $5,700. 

The Farrar Fund, a legacy from a former Treasurer, Samuel 
Farrar, established in 1865, amounts, with additions from 
income, to $22,000. 

34 



The Clarke Scholarship Fund of $1,200 was established in 1870 
in memory of Mrs. John Aiken Clarke. 

The Samuel H. Taylor Memorial Fund of $3,700 was estab- 
lished in 1871. 

The Peter Smith Byers Scholarship of $500 was established in 
1878 by the late John Byers. 

The Class of 1878 Scholarship Fund, established by the Classic 
cal Class of 1878, amounts to $873.80. 

The Jonathan Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1878 by the late Edward Taylor in memory of his father. 

The French Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 1879 by 
the bequest of Hiram W. French. 

The Caroline Parker Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1880 by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy. 

The Alden Memorial Fund of $5,000, a legacy from the late 
Dr. Ebenezer Alden, was established in 1881. 

The Gerard Sumner Wiggin Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1881 by the bequest of Lady Elizabeth Sumner 
Buckley-Mathew Fleming. 

The Stone Educational Fund of $25,000 was established in 
1882 by Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Warren F. Draper Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Warren F. Draper. 

The Richards Scholarship of $1,450 was established in 1889 
by the late Mrs. Mary A. Richards in memory of her sons. 

The Charles L. Flint Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the bequest of Hon. Charles L. Flint. 

The Henry P. Haven Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1890 by the estate of Henry P. Haven. 

The Emma Lane Smyth Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1890 by the late Ex-Governor Frederick Smyth of New 
Hampshire. 



35 



The James and Per sis Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Mrs. Mary E. Fairbanks. 

The Dowe Scholarship Fund, established in 1892 by the be- 
quest of Joseph Dowe, amounts to $3,097.98. 

The John Cornell Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was established 
in 1894 by the bequest of John Cornell for pupils from the town 
of Andover. 

The James Calvin Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was founded 
in 1895 by his sister, the late Mrs. Mary W. Fairbanks. 

The Mary W. Eolbrook Fund of $500 was founded in 1900 
by legacy of Mary W. Holbrook. 

The Edward Taylor Fund, a legacy from the late Edward 
Taylor, established in 1900, amounts to $1,000. 

The Ruby A. Carter Scholarship of $1,500 was founded in 1905 
by the late Mrs. Ruby A. Carter, in memory of her husband 
and daughter. 

The Herman Verhwff Hartwell Scholarship of $2,000 was 
founded in 1907 by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Hartwell in memory 
of their son. 

The Timothy A. Holt Scholarship Fund of $26,000 was estab- 
lished in 1908 by the bequest of Timothy A. Holt, for the benefit 
of pupils from the town of Andover. 

The James Huntington Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1910 by the widow and daughter of James Huntington, 
P. A. 1848. 

The Charles Clayton Clough Memorial Fund of $220 was 
founded in 1912 by his friends. 

The Allan Morse Penfield Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1913 by the legacy of Allan Morse Penfield, P. A. 1904. 

The George B. Knapp Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1914 by a legacy of Miss Katharine Knapp. 

36 



The James Greenleaf Fuller Memorial Scholarship of $200 is 
sustained by Samuel Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, in memory of his 
brother, and is available during his Senior year for a student 
of limited means, who in the judgment of the Principal embodies 
the best ideals of school life in scholarship, character, and 
influence. 

The Class of 1871 Andover-IIarvard Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by Henry S. Van Duzer, P. A. 1871, is awarded on the 
basis of high scholarship to a member of the Senior class who is 
preparing for Harvard; the award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his record 
up to that time. 

The Class of 1871 Harvard- Andover Scholarship of $300, also 
sustained by Henry S. Van Duzer, is available for a graduate of 
Phillips Academy during his Freshman year in Harvard Col- 
lege; the award, based on high scholarship, is made by the 
faculty of Phillips Academy, and is announced at the close of 
the recipient's Senior year in the school. 

The Henry P. Wright Scholarship of $300, sustained by an 
alumnus of the Academy in memory of Henry P. Wright, P. A. 
1863, late dean of Yale College, is awarded on the basis of high 
scholarship and character to a member of the Senior Class who 
is preparing for Yale. The award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his 
record up to that time. 

The Winston Trowbridge Townsend Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by John A. Keppelman, P. A. '97, in memory of his class- 
mate and friend, Winston Trowbridge Townsend.. is awarded 
at graduation to that member of the Senior class preparing for 
Yale, who, in the judgment of the Principal, is entitled, through 
scholarship, character, and influence, to special commendation. 



37 



The Howard W. Beat Memorial Scholarship of $200, sustained 
by a member of the class of 1894, is awarded annually by the 
Principal to a worthy student of limited means. 

The Robert Henry Coleman Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$6000 was established in 1919 by Mrs. John Coleman in memory 
of her son, Robert Henry Coleman, P. A. 1912, who died in the 
service of his country in the Great War. The annual income 
from this fund (approximately $300) is awarded, at the end of 
his Junior year, to a student of limited means, who, in the judg- 
ment of the Principal, has displayed the most promise of main- 
taining the highest standard of worth, measured by character, 
scholarship, and general influence in the school. 

The George Webster Otis Scholarship of $250, sustained by 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Otis in memory of their son George 
Webster Otis of the Class of 1914, who died in the military 
service of his country, is awarded to a student who in the 
judgment of the Principal combines the qualities of sound 
character and high ambition. 

The George Xavier McLanahan Memorial Fund of $10,000 
in memory of George Xavier McLanahan of the class of 1892, 
was established in 1919, by his mother and sister. The in- 
come is to be used for the assistance of a worthy student, or 
students, of limited means. 

The Gordon Ferguson Allen Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$5000 was established in 1920 by friends of the school, and the 
income is available for a deserving student of character and 
promise, and of limited means. 

The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship of fifty dollars 
is awarded annually to a member of the Academy, preference 
being given to a son of a member of the association. 

38 



The John Reed Williams Scholarship is available to Phillips 
Academy graduates at Yale under the following terms of gift: 

"The income from the John Reed Williams Fund of one thousand dollars, 
* * * is awarded annually at the close of Freshman or Sophomore year, * * * 
to a member of the Academic Freshman or Sophomore class, preferably from 
Phillips Academy, Andover, who is helping to support himself by his own efforts 
and has proved himself to be a man of high character, and of large promise, 
especially in English Literature or History." 

The Columbia University Scholarship. A scholarship, which 
practically amounts to the tuition charges, is granted by Colum- 
bia University each year to a student of Phillips Academy who 
has satisfied the full requirements for admission to the College, 
and whose standing in the Academy has been of sufficiently 
high grade to gain the recommendation of the school faculty. 
The scholarship may be renewed in the years following the 
Freshman year if a high grade is maintained. 

The Wesley an University Scholarship. Wesley an University 
grants each year to a student of Phillips Academy going to the 
University, a scholarship equal in amount to the tuition bill 
of the Freshman year. Provided the quality of his work 
warrants it, the scholarship is renewed each year throughout 
the college course. The award is made to that student whose 
high scholarship, in the opinion of the Academy Faculty, en- 
titles him to the scholarship. 

In addition to these scholarships, prizes amounting to $770.00 
are awarded annually. The conditions governing these prizes 
are given on pages 55 — 59. 



39 



SYNOPSIS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY 



As the subjects are taught with a view to the student's pro- 
gressive development, it is desirable for him to take the entire 
course in the Academy. In recent years the Academy has been 
forced to limit rigidly the number admitted to its Senior classes. 
In order that the student may plan his work to the greatest 
advantage, it is important that he decide as early as possible 
upon the higher institution which he intends to enter. He is 
designated as a classical or a scientific student in accordance 
with the character and requirements of the institution selected. 
The course of study is designed to furnish adequate preparation 
for any college or scientific school. 

Note. — The Courses of Study outlined below are effective from September 1920. The 
courses of the present year (1919-1920) are printed in the 1919 Catalogue. 

THE CLASSICAL COURSE 

CLASS IV — JUNIOR CLASS III — LOWER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 

Required a week Required a week 

Algebra 1 5 English 2 4 

English 1 *1 French 2 4 

French 1 **5 Latin 2 5 

Latin 1 5 German 1 or Greek 1 4 

16 17 

CLASS II — UPPER MIDDLE 

Hours Hours Hours 

Required a week Elective a week Elective a week 

Algebra 2 4 Chemistry °4 Bible 1 2 

English 3 4 French 3 4 Greek Testament 1 

Latin 3 5 German 1 4 Classical History 2 

f German 2 4 Greek 1 4 General Science 2 

\or Greek 2 5 American History 4 

J Ancient History 5 

17 or 18 English History 5 



Physics °4 
Spanish 1 4 

Numbers placed at the right and above a subject indicate successive courses in the same 
subject. The courses are described on pages 43-54. References are to footnote on page 41. 



40 



Hours 

Required a week 

English 4 4 
Plane Geometry 4 
Electives 10 

18 



CLASS I — SENIOR 





Hours 


Elective 


a week 


Algebra 3 


2 


Chemistry 


°4 


Mechanical Drawing |3 


French 3 


4 


German 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


Greek 1 or 3 


4 


Greek 2 


5 


American History 


4 


jAncient History 


5 


English History 


5 


Latin 4 


4 


Latin Composition 


1 


Physics 


°4 


Spanish 1 or 2 


4 


Trigonometry and 




Solid Geometry 


4 



Hours 



Elective a week 

Archaeology 1 

Bible 1 or 2 2 

French 4 2 

German 4 2 

Greek Testament 1 

Harmony 2 

Horace 1 
Contempary European 

History 2 

Modern English History 2 

General Science 2 

Psychology and Ethics 2 

Public Speaking 2 



THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR CLASS C — LOWER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 

Required a week Required a week 

Algebra 1 5 Algebra 2 4 

English 1 *1 English 2 4 

1 1 French 1 **5 llFrench 2 4 

Latin 1 5 Latin 2 5 

16 17 



♦This class meets twice a week, without home study. It is rated a one-hour course. 
**This class meets six times a week, twice without home study. It is rated a five-hour 
course. 

°Each laboratory period occupies two hours, but, not requiring home study, counts only 
one hour on the schedule. 

fMechanical Drawing takes six hours of class-room time, but requiring, no home 
preparation, counts only three hours on the schedule. 

tNot open to those who elect Classical History. 

1 1 German may be chosen in place of French. 



41 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 
Required a week Elective a week 



English 3 4 


French 1 or 3 


4 


Chemistry or Physics °4 


German 1 or 3 


4 


Plane Geometry 5 


American History 


4 


Electives 4 or 5 


Ancient History 


5 




English History 


5 


17 or 18 


Latin 3 


5 




Spanish 1 


4 




Bible 1 


2 




General Science 


2 



CLASS A — SENIOR 





Hours 




Hours 




Hours 


Required 


a week 


Elective 


a week 


Elective 


a week 


English 4 


4 


Algebra 3 


2 


Archaeology 


1 


History 


4 or 5 


Chemistry 


°4 


Bible 1 or 2 


2 


Trigonometry 




Mechanical Drawing f3 


French 4 


2 


and Solid Geometry 4 


French 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


German 4 


2 


Electives 


6 or 5 


German 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


Harmony 


2 






American History 


4 


Contempory European 




18 


Ancient History 


5 


History 


2 






English History 


5 


Modern English History 2 






Latin 4 


4 


General Science 


2 






Physics 


°4 


Psychology and Ethics 2 






Spanish 1 or 2 


4 


Public Speaking 


2 



Physical Training (3 hours a week) is required of all students. 

All Seniors must report to the Librarian for instruction in the use of the library. 



In order to define the work of the pupil in his Senior year, Upper Middlers are required 
to take preliminary examinations for some college. June examinations, both preliminary 
and final, are held in Andover by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

For references see footnotes on page 41. 



42 



STATEMENTS OF COURSES 



GREEK 

The first year (Greek 1 ) is devoted mainly to forms and the 
most essential principles of syntax. Benner and Smyth's Be- 
ginner s Greek Book is used. To aid the memorizing of inflec- 
tions and vocabularies there are daily exercises, both oral and 
written, enforced by incessant drill. In the third term Xeno- 
phon's Anabasis is begun and the reading extends at least 
through the first three chapters of Book I. 

The second year (Greek 2 ) is occupied with Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-IV, or an equivalent, with sight reading, 
translation from English into Greek, and grammar reviews. 
Great effort is made to secure simple, idiomatic English in both 
oral and written work. Grammar and composition are studied 
throughout the year and occupy a part of every recitation 
period. 

There is an elective course in the Greek Testament — one 
hour a week — open to both Upper Middlers and Seniors. 

The third year (Greek 3 ) is spent mainly in reading selected 
books of the Iliad and the Odyssey. After the dialect is mas- 
tered, more attention is given to the literary side of the poems 
and to the translation of Homer at sight, about 5000 verses 
being read during the year. 

LATIN 

The first year's work (Latin 1 ) consists of thorough drill in the 
essentials of the grammar and of training in methods of study. 
There is constant practice in the writing of Latin. In the spring 
term, Book II of Caesar's Gallic War, or an equivalent amount 
of Latin selections, is read.* 

♦This work is designed for five periods of fifty-three minutes each a week. This neces- 
sarily implies a larger total of work for the year than that of the average High School. 
Students preparing for Latin 2 should take notice of this fact. 



43 



In the second-year course (Latin 2 ) Books I, III, IV, or V of 
the Gallic War, and about ten Lives of Nepos, or an equivalent 
in selections, are read. There is continued study of Latin prose 
composition and syntax, of word formation, and of method in 
sight translation. 

In the third year (Latin 3 ) the course in Cicero aims to render 
the student familiar with the chief characteristics of Cicero's 
oratory, with his life, and with the history and antiquities of 
his time. The work in Latin prose composition is devoted to 
connected narrative based on the text studied. The Catili- 
nian Orations, the Manilian Law, the Archias, the Marcellus 
and the Milo or de Senectute or Sallust's Catiline are read. 
There is also sight reading. 

In the fourth year (Latin 4 ) poetic diction and prosody receive 
attention and every effort is made to cultivate a sympathetic 
appreciation of good literature. Books I- VI of the Aeneid, and 
the Bucolics or an equivalent amount from the Metamorphoses 
of Ovid, or Cicero's de Amicitia are read, with additional prac- 
tice in reading at sight. Topics in the private life and customs 
of the Romans are studied. 

FRENCH 

The first year's work (French 1 ) comprises the princi- 
ples of pronunciation, drill in the fundamentals of gram- 
mar including the inflections of the regular and the more 
common irregular verbs, of nouns, of adjectives, of participles, 
of pronouns; the uses of pronouns, the simple uses of the con- 
ditional and subjunctive, and the elementary rules of syntax; 
abundant easy exercises for oral translation into French, and 
the reading of about two hundred pages of easy French prose. 
The following texts have been used. Kuhn's Reader, .Super's 
Reader, Aldrich & Foster's Reader, La Tulipe Noire, UEte de la 
Saint-Martin, Sans Famille, and Fraser and Squair's Grammar. 

The second-year course (French 2 ) of four hours completes the 

44 



elementary course in French and consists of a review of ele- 
mentary grammar and continued work in composition and 
translation. Such texts as Colombo,, La Mere de la Marquise, 
Le Roi des Montagnes, Syntax of the the French Verb, and Com- 
fort's Composition have been used. 

The third year (French 3 ) covers the work of the college 
examination for Intermediate French. Contes de Daudet, La 
Debacle, Les Miserables, and similar texts furnish material for 
translation and work in composition and grammar is done 
throughout the year. 

The fourth-year work (French 4 ) consists of rapid reading and 
translation of selected passages from English authors, with dis- 
cussion of helpful topics in French history and literature as they 
come in the course. This course is for those who have passed 
the College examinations and who wish to continue their work 
in the language. 

GERMAN 

The first year's work (German 1 ) comprises the principles 
of pronunciation, drill in the inflection of the articles 
and the commoner nouns, adjectives, pronouns, and weak and 
strong verbs, also in the use of prepositions, the simpler uses of 
the modal auxiliaries, and the elementary rules of syntax and 
word order; abundant easy exercises for translation into Ger- 
man; and the translation of about 150 pages of easy German 
prose, such as is contained in Huss's or Nichols's Readers. 
Bierwirth and Herrick's Aehrenlese and Leander's Traumereien. 
In the Junior Class Vos's Essentials of German has been used ; 
in the Lower Middle Class Wesselhoeft's Elementary German 
Grammar, and Chiles's German Prose Composition. 

The second-year course (German 2 ) which completes the ele- 
mentary work in German, comprises a thorough review of 
elementary grammar, as outlined above, and continued trans- 
lation and composition. Ham and Leonard's German Grammar 

45 



and Collar's First Year German have been used in these classes, 
and texts such as the following have been studied: Riehl's 
Burg Neideck, Rosegger's Das Holzknechthaus, Gerstacker's 
Irrfahrten and Heyse's Das Madchen von Treppi. 

The third year's work (German 3 ) prepares for the examination 
in Intermediate German as set by the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. Such texts as Freytag's Die Journalisten, 
Heine's Harzreise, Keller's Kleider machen Leute, Schiller's 
Jungfrau von Orleans , Wilhelm Tell, and Der Dreissigjahrige 
Krieg III are read and advanced grammar and composition are 
studied throughout the year. Bernstorff's Handbook of German 
Grammar, Ham and Leonard's German Grammar, and Pope's 
composition books have been used in this work. 

The fourth-year course (German 4 ) of two hours a week con- 
sists in the rapid reading and discussion of classic and modern 
prose and poetry, readings in the history of German literature, 
German conversation and institutions. This course is an 
elective, open to those who have passed the third year's work 
in German or the College Entrance Examination Board's 
"German B"; also, upon consultation with the instructor, to 
others who can satisfy him of their ability to do the work of the 
course. Students in this class are not recommended for addi- 
tional college credits in German. 

SPANISH 

The first year's work (Spanish 1 ) is as follows: — (a) thorough 
drill in the principles of pronunciation; (b) rules of syntax and 
essentials of Spanish grammar including the inflection of verbs 
(regular and irregular), nouns, adjectives, pronouns, the uses of 
the conditional and subjunctive; (c) abundant easy exercises for 
translation into Spanish; (d) the translation of two hundred or 
more pages of easy Spanish prose, such as is contained in Hill's 
Spanish Tales, Berge-Soler and Hatheway's Reader, Morrison's 
Tres Comedias, Alarcon's Short Stories, Isaac's Maria, and 
Supple's Spanish Reader; grammars such as De Vitis's, Hills 

46 



and Ford's, Crawford's First Book in Spanish and Moreno- 
Lacalle's Elementos de Espanol. 

The second-year course (Spanish 2 ) completes the elementary 
course in Spanish and consists of a complete review of Spanish 
grammar and continued work in composition and translation. 
Such texts as El Capitdn Veneno, JosS, Zaragiieta, Umphrey's 
Spanish Prose Composition have been used. 

ENGLISH 

The work of English 1 in composition is based on themes, — 
simple narratives and descriptions — written in the class-room. 
Attention is given to the correction of grammatical errors in 
speech and writing, with necessary consideration of formal 
grammar; to elementary matters of the structure and the 
punctuation of the sentence; to spelling; and to the acquisition 
of a vocabulary. The work in literature consists in reading 
aloud and discussing in the class-room a few short works in 
verse and prose. Considerable emphasis is placed on enuncia- 
tion and pronunciation. (Students planning to enter the 
Lower Middle class in English are advised to read St. Ives, 
Nicholas Nickleby, and Les Misirables, but equivalents will be 
accepted.) 

In the teaching of composition in English 2 , the general 
plan of the preceding year is continued, with a somewhat 
higher standard of requirement, the chief object being to 
secure plenty of practice. Themes are written outside of 
the class-room as well as during the recitation period. The 
study of some elementary matters of rhetoric is begun. 
The textbook used for the work in composition is Ward's 
Sentence and Theme. The study of literature comprises the 
careful reading of some books and the rapid reading of others. 
Among the books prescribed are: Richard II, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde, The Woman in White, The Virginian, and English Narra- 
tive Poems (Fuess and Sanborn). Particular attention is given 

47 



to oral English, each student being required to deliver two care- 
fully prepared speeches each term and to read aloud in the 
class-room as frequently as possible. 

In English 3 the thorough study of formal rhetoric is begun. 
As many themes as possible are written outside of the class- 
room, and considerable writing is done in the class-room. The 
textbook used is Herrick and Damon's New Composition and 
Rhetoric. The course in literature includes the careful reading 
of six or seven books, selected in part from the list for reading (A) 
prescribed in the College Entrance Requirements; the lives 
of the authors; and the rapid reading, optional or required, of as 
many other books as possible. 

In English 4 the principles of composition-rhetoric studied 
in the preceding year are reviewed, with a higher standard of 
requirement in their application to writing. Herrick and 
Damon's New Composition and Rhetoric is used in this year also. 
Frequent themes and writing in the class-room are required. 
The course in literature includes the rapid reading of some books 
and the careful study of others; the life and times of the chief 
authors; and as much supplementary reading as possible. The 
work of this year completes the preparation for the compre- 
hensive examination offered by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Public Speaking is taken up as part of the Lower Middle 
English course. 

An elective course in Public Speaking comprises training in 
the preparation and delivery of expositions, argumentative 
speeches, and debates. A considerable amount of oral reading 
and extemporaneous speaking is done throughout the course. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

In the two curriculum courses the Bible is studied as an 
English classic. Attention is constantly given to the Biblical 

48 



sources of common quotations and allusions. The methods and 
standards are those of the other school studies. Each of the 
courses extends through a year, with two recitation periods each 
week. 

The first course (Bible 1 ) consists of nearly all the Old Testa- 
ment narratives. The textbook is Sheffield's The Old Testament 
Narrative. If time allows, selections from the New Testament 
are taken up in the spring term. 

The second course (Bible 2 ) includes the historical books of 
the Old Testament and numerous ^elections from the poetical 
and prophetical writings. The textbook is the complete Old 
Testament in the King James version as published in four 
volumes in "Everyman's Library" under the title Ancient 
Hebrew Literature. 

Provision is also made in the winter term for the study of the 
life and teaching of Christ in voluntary classes led by the 
Principal and others from the faculty. 

ALGEBRA 

Algebra 1 . The study of Algebra is begun in the Junior 
year in a course occupying five hours a week throughout 
the year. Slaught & Lennes's Elementary Algebra is used as a 
textbook and Chapters I-XI and XIII-XVIII, omitting imagin- 
ary numbers, are completed. 

Algebra 2 . This course provides a review of Algebra 1 
and continues the subject through all the usual topics of Ele- 
mentary and Intermediate Algebra. It is required in Class C 
and in Class II. Candidates for entrance to the Academy 
desiring credit for this course must present a college entrance 
certificate giving credit for both Elementary and Intermediate 
Algebra. 

Algebra 3 . This course covers the topics in Advanced 
Algebra specified by the College Entrance Examination 

49 



Board and meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and 
scientific schools. If not offered for admission it may be used 
to secure advanced credit at some colleges. 

GEOMETRY 

Demonstrative Plane Geometry is begun and completed in the 
Upper Middle year of the Scientific Course and in the Senior 
year of the Classical Course. Four, or five, recitations a week 
are given to the subject. The chief aim of the instruction is to 
develop in each student the ability to reason clearly and logically. 
Accuracy, clearness, and completeness of statement are insisted 
upon. To develop originality and independence of thought 
about two-thirds of the time is devoted to the solution of exer- 
cises of gradually increasing difficulty. Candidates for entrance 
to the Academy may secure credit for this course by presenting 
a college entrance certificate giving credit for it. 

In the Senior year Solid Geometry is taught four hours a 
week during the winter term and two hours during the spring 
term. The course meets the entrance requirements of all col- 
leges and scientific schools, and, when not offered for admission, 
may be substituted for Freshman work in the subject. 

TRIGONOMETRY 

A course in Plane Trigonometry meeting four hours a week 
during the fall term and two hours during the spring term, forms, 
with Solid Geometry, a full four-hour course for the Senior year. 
It meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and scientific 
schools, and may be substituted for Freshman work in the 
subject, if not used toward admission. During the spring term 
a one-hour-a-week course is given in Spherical Trigonometry for 
those wishing to extend their knowledge, and for those planning 
to pass Trigonometry E of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. 

50 



MECHANICAL DRAWING 

This course consists of six hours a week. It includes the use 
of drawing instruments, lettering, geometric constructions, 
orthographic and isometric projections, developments, inter- 
sections, sectioning and working drawings. Especial stress is 
laid on a thorough mastering of the fundamentals. The course 
meets the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board and in many instances so prepares the student that he 
can obtain advance credit for the subject on his entrance to 
college. Students of exceptional ability are given an oppor- 
tunity to do the more advanced work in Machine Drawing, — 
or problems in keeping with the course to be pursued on entrance 
to college. 

PHYSICS 

The instruction in Physics is given by the use of a textbook 
and by practical work in the laboratory. The text is accom- 
panied with numerical examples and by qualitative experiments 
designed to illustrate physical laws and their application to 
practical life. 

Forty or more quantitative laboratory experiments are re- 
quired of each pupil. A careful record of the steps and results 
of these exercises is kept in a note-book which is submitted to 
the instructor for approval. 

CHEMISTRY 

The sections of the class in Chemistry, each meeting four 
times a week, cover the same ground and prepare for the 
entrance examinations in Chemistry of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

In two hours a week throughout the year, some half-dozen 
of the greater doctrines of natural science are approached from 

51 



the cultural rather than the technical side, with especial atten- 
tion, on the one hand, to their historical development, and on 
the other, to their relation to every-day phenomena. The 
course is also, in part, a preparation for the more detailed 
studies which follow, and is correlated with the instruction in 
English of its own year. 

ARCHEOLOGY 

The work of the department is chiefly confined to the United 
States, and research in other subjects than American archaeology 
is not extensively attempted. 

At present the collections number about 96,000 specimens, 
all of which represent the stone age art. 

The publications of the department number seven : — Bulletin 
No. 1, on the Exploration of Jacob's Cavern; No. 2, The Gor- 
gets; No. 3, Field Work in Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, Arizona, 
and New Mexico; No. 4, The Exploration of Bushey Cavern and 
the Exploration of Fort Ancient; No. 5, A Study and Descrip- 
tion of the Seven Prehistoric Earthworks found near Andover; 
No. 6, A Study of Hematite Implements found in the United 
States. The Red Paint People of Maine (preliminary paper). 

HISTORY 

Courses are offered in the Ancient History, English History, 
American History, Contemporary European History, and 
Modern English History. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

All students are required to take some form of exercise during 
the school year. Upon entering the school each boy receives 
a careful physical and medical examination, and a form of 
exercise suited to his peculiar needs is advised. Special atten- 
tion is given to those who lack normal development. The 

52 



school, club, and squad teams give all students an opportunity 
to compete in sports with those of their own relative ability. 
No student is allowed to compete on school teams unless per- 
mission indicating his fitness is received from the Physical 
Director, 

MUSIC 

Opportunity for the study of piano and organ is offered by 
the Director of Music. 

A two-hour course in Harmony has been added to the curri- 
culum as an elective, this course preparing for the College 
Entrance Board Examination. 

Students who sing in the choir, every member attending two 
rehearsals a week, are offered one of three forms of compen- 
sation; (a) financial; (b) one athletic cut a week; (c) permission 
to count the choir work as one schedule hour. 

Serious attention is given the school orchestra which re- 
hearses weekly and studies carefully a lengthy classical com- 
position such as a symphony by Haydn or Mozart. 

A series of recitals is given in the school chapel on the Wednes- 
day afternoons of the winter term. These recitals had to be 
omitted during the winter of 1919-1920 owing to the building 
operations in connection with the enlarging of the chapel, but 
among the concerts given upon its completion will be a re- 
dedicatory recital by M. Bonnet of Paris, a concert by the 
school orchestra — Haydn's Symphony in D major — with 
the annual prize competition in quartette singing, and the 
annual joint choral concert with Bradford Academy, the pro- 
gram consisting of Part I of Haydn's Seasons, together with 
miscellaneous numbers. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Beginning with the fall of 1920, a two-hour course will be 
offered in elementary philosophy, such as is given in many of the 

53 



higher European schools. The first term will be devoted to 
Elementary Psychology, the second to Elementary Logic, and 
the third to Elementary Metaphysics and Ethics. The object 
of the course is to familiarize those students who possess philo- 
sophical interest with the nomenclature and rudiments of the 
various philosophical disciplines, so that they will be thoroughly 
conversant with these when they reach college or the university. 
During the first and last terms the schedule hours will be de- 
voted primarily to lectures, while the textbook, Jevon's 
Elementary Lessons in Logic, will be used as the basis for the 
work of the second term. 



54 



PRIZES 



The following prizes are offered annually for proficiency in 
the work of the several departments: 

IN ENGLISH 

The Draper Prizes for Selected Declamations, founded in 1866 
by the late Warren F. Draper, of the class of 1843, of Andover. 
Prizes of twenty-five dollars and of fifteen dollars are awarded. 
The competition is open to all students. A preliminary trial 
before a committee is held early in May, the final competitors 
being chosen on the basis of the best rendered selections. 
The fifty-third competition occurred June 9, 1919. 

The Means Prizes for Original Declamations, founded in 1867 
by the late William G. Means, of Boston. Prizes of twenty 
dollars, of twelve dollars, and of eight dollars are awarded. 
Students in any class may compete. Eight are selected for the 
final competition by the judges who later act as a committee 
of award, the prizes being given on the merits of both composi- 
tion and delivery. The fifty -second competition was held May 
„ 1, 1919. 

The Robinson Prizes for Debate, founded in 1896 by the late 

H. S. Robinson, of Andover, are open to three members of the 
Philomathean debating society and a team chosen from the 
school. A prize of thirty dollars is awarded to the representa- 
tives presenting the better argument, irrespective of the merits 
of the question. The twenty-third competition occurred June 

I, 1918. 

The Andrew Potter Prizes, sustained since 1904 by James 
Tracy Potter, of the class of 1890, in memory of his father and 
brother. Two prizes of thirty dollars and twenty dollars 

55 



respectively are offered to those members of the graduating 
class who shall deliver, at the Commencement exercises in June, 
the best essays on assigned subjects. The competition is open 
to Seniors. The sixteenth competition was held June 11, 1919. 

The Schweppe Prizes, sustained by Charles H. Schweppe of 
the class of 1898. Two prizes, one of thirty dollars and one of 
twenty dollars, are awarded for excellence in English, and are 
open to members of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. The 
eighth competition occurred in June, 1919. 

The Goodhue English Prizes, established in 1916 by the family 
of the late Francis A. Goodhue of Andover, in memory of his 
devotion to Phillips Academy. Two prizes are offered, one of 
fifteen dollars and one of ten dollars, for excellence in English 
literature and composition, including the more practical topics 
of elementary rhetoric. The competition is open to members 
of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. 

IN GREEK 

The Joseph Cook Greek Prizes, founded in 1879 by the late 
Joseph Cook, D.D., of the class of 1857. The prizes are fifteen, 
ten, and five dollars respectively. The special topics included 
in the forty-second competition Juno, 1921, will be translations 
at sight: 

1. From Homer. 

2. From Attic Greek Prose. 

There will also be questions on Greek literature and antiquities. 

IN LATIN 

The Dove Latin Prizes, sustained from 1880 to 1908 by the 
late George W. W. Dove, of the class of 1853, of Andover, and 
continued by his sons. The prizes of twenty, fifteen, and ten 
dollars are awarded for excellence in Latin and are open to 
Seniors. 



56 



IN THE CLASSICS 



The Valpey Classical Prizes, founded in 1893 by the late Rev. 
Thomas G. Valpey, of the class of 1854. Two prizes of ten 
dollars each are awarded; one for excellence in Latin Composi- 
tion, one for excellence in Greek Composition. The competi- 
tion is open to members of the Upper Middle class. The 
twenty-fourth competition occurred in June, 1919. 

IN MATHEMATICS 

The Convers Mathematical Prizes, founded in 1897 by the late 
E. B. Convers, of the class of 1857, of Englewood, N. J. 
Three prizes of twenty dollars, fifteen dollars, and ten dollars 
are awarded for excellence in the mathematics of the Classical 
Department, to be determined by an examination held in May. 

IN PHYSICS 

The Wadsworth Prize, sustained since 1900 by William S. 
Wadsworth, M.D., of the class of 1887, a prize of ten dollars, is 
awarded to that member of the Scientific Department who has 
obtained the highest rank in Physics for the year. 

IN GERMAN 

The Robert Stevenson German Prize, founded in 1904 by Robert 
Stevenson, Jr., of the class of 1896, in memory of his father. A 
prize of twelve dollars is awarded for excellence in German 
Composition. The competition is open to Seniors and Upper 
Middlers of both departments. 

The John Aiken German Prizes, two prizes, one of twenty dol- 
lars and one of ten dollars, are sustained by a member of the 
class of 1873 in memory of John Aiken, a member of the Board 
of Trustees from 1845 to 1863. The competition is open to 
Seniors and Upper Middlers of both departments, and the 
examination, based on which the prizes are awarded, will con- 

57 



tain questions on German geography, a specified period of 
German history, the lives and writings of German authors 
previously assigned, and one or more passages of German prose 
or poetry for translation into English. 

IN FRENCH 

The Frederic Holkins Taylor Prize was founded in 1908 by an 
anonymous friend of the class of 1868. A prize of eight dollars 
is awarded for excellence in French conversation or French 
composition. 

IN AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY 

A prize of twenty-five dollars is awarded annually to that 
member of the class in American Archaeology who maintains 
the highest standing in the course. 

IN CHEMISTRY 

The Dalton Prize in Chemistry , a prize of fifty dollars, founded 
in 1915 by Frederick Goodrich Crane, P. A. 1884, is awarded 
annually to that student maintaining the highest rank in 
Chemistry for the year. 

IN HISTORY 

The George Lauder Prize was founded in memory of George 
Lauder of the class of P. S. 1897. A prize of fifty dollars is 
awarded for excellence in English History. 

FOR ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

The Builer-Thwing Prize, a prize of fifteen dollars, founded 
by Capt. Francis Butler-Thwing of the class of 1908 is 
awarded annually to that member of the Junior class who has 

58 



secured the highest average in his examinations for entrance 
to the Academy. 

FOR HIGH SCHOLARSHIP 

The Faculty Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by San- 
ford H. E. Freund, P. A. 1897, is awarded annually to that mem- 
ber of the graduating class who has attained the highest general 
average in scholarship. 

IN GENERAL EXCELLENCE 

The Fuller Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by Samuel 
Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, is awarded at his graduation to that 
member of the class who has best exemplified and upheld in 
his work and life at Andover the ideals and traditions of Phillips 
Academy. Only those who have been members of the school 
for at least two full academic years are eligible for this prize. 

The Otis Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained by Joseph 
E. Otis, P. A. 1888, and is awarded to that member of the Senior 
class who, having been a member of the school for at least three 
years, has, in the judgment of the Faculty, shown the greatest 
general improvement. 

The Boston Yale Club Cup is awarded annually by the Yale 
Club of Boston to that member of the Senior class who attains 
the highest proficiency in scholarship and athletics. 

The Federation of Harvard Clubs Prize. The New England 
Federation of Harvard Clubs awards annually to that student 
who is taking the preliminary examination for Harvard College 
and is, in the judgment of the authorities of the Academy, 
best fitted to receive it, a set of books of some standard author. 
In the award excellence in scholarship may be combined with 
either excellence in manly sports or with any example of dis- 
tinguished moral courage or endeavor. 

A number of prize scholarships are awarded each June. The 
conditions governing these awards may be found on pages 37-39. 

59 



AWARD OF PRIZES, 1918-1919 

The Draper (1) Robert Chapman Bates, Bay Shore, L. I., N. Y. 
Prizes (2) Elmer Joseph Babin, East Cleveland, Ohio. 

ThP M«nr,<, W Hu § h Hardin g Spencer, Andover. 

pSZZ (*) Robert Chapman Bates, Bay Shore, L. I., N. Y. 
rnzes (3) L& ^ e D&vid Newe u Dav i s> East Norwalk, Conn. 

fobi Jon Prizes Not awarded 

a a (1) EJ mer Joseph Babin, East Cleveland, Ohio. 

frizes W Preston Woodling, Cranford, N. J. 

The (1) Robert Martin, Newtonville. 

Schweppe Prizes (2) Robert Chapman Bates, Bay Shore, L, I., N. Y. 

(1) Robert Martin, Newtonville. 
The (2) Hugh Harding Spencer, Andover. 

Goodhue Prizes Honorable Mention 

Albert Lacy Russel, Jacksonville, Fla. 

(1) Hayden Newhall Smith, Buffalo. N. Y. 
Cook Prizes @> John Coggeshall, New York, N. Y. 
Look frizes (g) John Cornwall, Short Hills, N. J. 

(1) Hayden Newhall Smith, Buffalo, N. Y. 
The (2) Elmer Joseph Babin, East Cleveland, Ohio. 

Dove Prizes (3) Jesse Chase Dann, Jr., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Honorable Mention 
Albert Lacy Russel, Jacksonville, Fla. 

The Latin — Charles Sumner Lunt, Jr., Rochester, N. Y. 
Valpey Prizes Greek — Paul Clement Daniels, Buffalo, N. Y. 

m» (1) Louis Henry Fitch, Jr., Newton Centre. 

n « . (2) George Henry Patterson Lacey, Nashville, Tenn. 
Comers Prizes ^ Harold Beecher Noyes, Trenton, N. J. 

rp, John Milton Hopkins, Morristown, N. J. 

Honorable Mention 



Wadsworth Prize 



Preston Woodling, Cranford, N. J. 



The John Milton Hopkins, Morristown, N. J. 

Robert Stevenson Honorable Mention 

German Prize Stanley de Jongh Osborne, Guatemala City, Guatemala. 

60 



The 
John Aiken 
German Prizes 

The 
Fuller Prize 

The 
Otis Prize 

The 

Frederic Holkins 
Taylor Prize 



The American 
Archaeology Prize 

The 
Snell History 
Prize 

The 
George Lauder 
History Prize 



The Dalton 
Chemistry Prize 



The 
Faculty Prize 

The 

Boston Yale Club 
Cup 

The New England 

Federation of 
Harvard Clubs Prize 

The 

Harvard- A ndover 
Scholarships 

The James 
Greenleaf Fuller 
Memorial 
Scholarship 



(1) Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr., Rochester, N. Y. 

(2) Elmer Joseph Babin, East Cleveland, Ohio. 



Not awarded. 



Hing Sung Mok, Hong Kong, China. 



Arnold Guyot Cameron, Jr., Princeton, N. J. 



Divided between 
Bradford Hinckley Burnham, Cambridge. 
Robert Martin, Newtonville. 

Albert Lacy Russel, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Honorable Mention 
Sheridan Logan, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Divided between 
John William Borman, New York, N. Y. 
Wayland Fames Vaughan, Newton Centre. 

Divided between 
Leonidas Fletcher, Jr., Greenville, Miss. 
William Frizzell Wyman, Augusta, Me. 

Divided between 
Sheridan Logan, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Preston Woodling, Cranford, N. J. 



Jesse Chase Dann, Jr., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Richard Harvey Sears, Cambridge. 



Sheridan Logan, St. Joseph, Mo. 

John Milton Hopkins, Morristown, N. J. 



Paul Clement Daniels, Buffalo, N. Y. 



61 



The 

Butler-Thvying Alfred Sherman Foote, Englewood, N. J. 
Prize 

The 

Henry P. Wright Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr., Rochester, N. Y. 
Scholarship 

The Winston 

T To°wn^d Wayland Farries Vaughan, Newton Centre. 

Scholarship 



62 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS, 1918-1919 



HONORS OF THE FIRST GRADE 



Awarded to those who have no grade lower than 82 and a grade of at least 92 
in half the number of hours. 



Seniors — 

E. J. Babin 2 terms H. N. Smith 

S. Logan 3 terms W. F. Vaughan 

A. L. Russel 1 term P. Woodling 

Upper Middlers — 
J. M. Hopkins 

Lower Middlers — 

R. H. Perry 1 term J. W. Sanborn 



3 terms A. L. Johnson, Jr. 

C. S. Lunt, Jr. 3 terms 



2 terms 
1 term 

3 terms 



2 terms 



2 terms 



HONORS OF THE SECOND GRADE 
Awarded to those who have an average of 85 and no grade lower than 72. 



Seniors — 

E. J. Babin 
R. C. Bates 
J. C. Dann, Jr. 
H. W. Hill 

B. P. Hyde 
W. L. Jones 

Upper Middlers — 
T. L. Bates 
J. G. Coleman 
P. C. Daniels 
J. V. A. Fine 
E. J. Hanley 
A. L. Johnson, Jr. 

Lower Middlers — 
G. K. Black 
A. Brayton 
W. M. Fairleigh 

C. S. Gage 



1 term 

1 term 
3 terms 
3 terms 
3 terms 

2 terms 



2 terms 
1 term 

3 terms 
1 term 
1 term 
1 term 



1 term 
1 term 
1 term 
1 term 
F. M. Wheelock 



M. H. Linn, Jr. 
R. Martin 
B. B. Murdock 
A. L. Russel 
W. F. Vaughan 
O. M. Whipple 



H. C. Knapp 
L. W. Parkhurst 
H. S. Pole, 2d 
A. S. Renfrew 
H. C. Rich 
D. R. Wyandt 



H. A. Paget 
R. H. Perry 
J. W. Sanborn 
D. D. Stevenson 
2 terms 



2 terms 

1 term 

2 terms 
2 terms 

1 term 

2 terms 



1 term 
1 term 
1 term 

1 term 

2 terms 
1 term 



1 term 
1 term 
1 term 
3 terms 



Juniors — 

B. C. Cutler 



1 term 
L. B. Merrick 



G. E. Faithfull 
2 terms 



2 terms 



63 



SENIOR HONORS 

CLASS OF 1919 
BIBLE 

Dwight Pettee Colburn 



Leonidas Fletcher, Jr. 
Bennet Bronson Murdock 



John Alexander, Jr. 
Elmer Joseph Babin 
Walter Leiand Jones 



Sheridan Logan 



Arnold Guyot Cameron, Jr. 
Bennet Bronson Murdock 



CHEMISTRY 

Walter Neal Webster 

ENGLISH 

Preston Woodling 

FRENCH, ELEMENTARY 

Preston Woodling 

FRENCH, ADVANCED 



Albert Lacy Russel 
Hugh Harding Spencer 



Philip Edwin Kimball 
Sheridan Logan 
Brooks Palmer 



Wayland Farries Vaughan 



Albert Lacy Russel 
Hayden Newhall Smith 



Jesse Chase Dann, Jr. 



Sheridan Logan 



GERMAN, ELEMENTARY 

Preston Woodling 

GREEK, ADVANCED 

Hayden Newhall Smith 

HARMONY 

Robert Chapman Bates 

HISTORY, AMERICAN 

Oliver Mayhew Whipple 

HISTORY, ANCIENT 

John Cornwall 



George Ffrost Sawyer 



Albert Lacy Russel 



Sheridan Logan 



HISTORY, CAUSES OF THE WAR 

Preston Woodling 



HISTORY, CLASSICAL 

Leslie David Newell Davis Hayden Newhall Smith 



John William Borman 



HISTORY, ENGLISH 



64 



Wayland Farries Vaughan 



LATIN 

Jesse Chase Dann, Jr. Albert Lacy Russel 

Hayden Newhall Smith 

LATIN COMPOSITION 

Herbert Wells Hill 

MATHEMATICS, ADVANCED ALGEBRA 

Herbert Wells Hill Charles Stewart Parker 

Bennet Bronson Murdock Alpheus Beede Stickney, 2d 

MATHEMATICS, SOLID GEOMETRY 

Herbert Wells Hill Walter Leland Jones 

Preston Woodling 

MATHEMATICS, TRIGONOMETRY 

Walter Leland Jones Sheridan Logan 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

John Willis Richards Walter Neal Webster 



Wayland Farries Vaughan Preston Woodling 

SPANISH 

Sheridan Logan Bennet Bronson Murdock 

Oliver Mayhew Whipple 



CUM LAUDE 



Elmer Joseph Babin 
Jesse Chase Dann, Jr. 
Herbert Wells Hill 
Bruce Porter Hyde 
Walter Leland Jones 
Milman Hart Linn, Jr. 



Sheridan Logan 
Bennet Bronson Murdock 
Hayden Newhall Smith 
Wayland Farries Vaughan 
Oliver Mayhew Whipple 
Preston Woodling 



From the Class of 1918 
Albert Lacy Russel 



These members of the class of 1919 were elected to membership in the Cum 
Laude Society on the basis of their superior scholarship in all subjects for their 
Senior year. 

This society aims to bestow that recognition upon high scholarship in the 
preparatory schools which the Phi Beta Kappa Society gives to it in the colleges. 



65. 



CLASS OF 1919 



The following students, members of the class of 1919 unless otherwise indi- 
cated, have entered college. 

Amherst — Alan Robbins Clark (ex-1920), Russell Le Roux Houghton, John 
Ashcroft Spear, James Baker Williams. 

Bowdoin— Edwin Gordon Hebb (1920). 

Cornell — John Williams Borman, Walter Mendelson Jones (1920), William 
Augustus Schreyer. 

Dartmouth — George Harold Broadley (1920), John Hamilton Burroughs, 
Frederick Harrison Caswell (1920), George Wells Ferguson (ex-1920), Morton 
Woodbury Fletcher, Herbert Quimby Home (1918), Andrew John Howarth 
(ex-1920), John Walter Johnston, 2d, Charles Henry Jones, Jr. (1920), Walter 
Leland Jones, Philip Edwin Kimball, Walter Keif Maroney (1920), John Law- 
rence Miles, Radcliffe Morse Oxley, Brooks Palmer, Edward Wells Peters, 
Stanford Church Richmond, George Richard Scammon, Sidney Silberman, 
Philip Kinsell Swartz, Percy Weston Wanamaker (1917), Leon Henry Young, Jr. 
(1920). 

Harvard — Elmer Joseph Babin, John Davidson Benjamin, James Kimball 
Dow, Frederick Flather, John Rogers Flather, Leonidas Fletcher, Jr., Charles 
Pelham Greenough Fuller, Samuel Lester Fuller, Jr. (ex-1919), Benjamin 
Woodson Huiskamp, John Edward Kennedy, Milman Hart Linn, Jr., Vincent 
Bliss Linn, Sheridan Logan, Robert Martin, Edward Gillette Selden, Whitney 
Savage Smith, Edward Converse Wilson, Phillips Elder Wilson, John Gordon 
Winchester, William Frizzell Wyman. 

University of Kansas — Charles Dixon (1920), Dudley Rhodes Wyandt 
(1920). 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology— Raymond Leland Bowles (ex- 
1919), Sherwood Isbell Berger, Franklin Groves Clement, John Aldrich Dow 
(1920), Howard Dickson Hackett, George Hale Hewett (ex-1920), Hall Kirk- 
ham (1920), William Edward May, Edmund Huddleston Miller (1920), Edward 
Gilman Pierce, Herman Fay Pike, Thomas Lawrence Powers (1920), Thomas 
Orin Richards, Charles Frederic Smith, Jr., Hugh Harding Spencer, Philip 
Morris Stearns, Herrick Ogden Tappan, Walter Neal Webster, Preston Wood- 
ling, Hin Fun Yung (1920). 

University of Michigan — John McDonald Burge (ex-1920). 



66 



University of Pennsylvania — Jerome Bartlett. 



Northwestern University — Henry Day Penfield (1920). 

Princeton — Arnold Guyot Cameron, Jr., Alexander McCook Dunlop (1920), 
Gelston Hardy, Warner Rutherford James, Nathaniel Stevens, 2d (ex-1920), 
Charles Barnwell Straut, Robert Eli Winkler (1920). 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute — Harvey Shepherd Morgan (1920), 
Sumner Lord Willson (1921). 

Rutgers — John Mumm Ellis. 

Tufts — Hawes Bailey Hallett (1921). 

Syracuse University — Charles Rose Thompson. 

Williams — Joseph Titcomb Chatman (1920), John Cornwall, Everett 
Eddy Lyles. 

University of Wisconsin — John Alexander, Jr., John Willis Richards. 

Yale College — John Reynolds Atterbury, Robert Chapman Bates, David 
Hardwick Bigelow, Leonard Le Valley Bishop, Jr., Chester Guild Boltwood 
(1917), Playford Boyle (1920), Richard Phillips Breed (1920), Harvey Temple- 
ton Brown, Paul Ferris Clifford, John Coggeshall, Dwight Pettee Colburn, Alan 
M{lls Cooper (ex-1919), Edwin Hunt Cummings, Jr., Jesse Chase Dann, Jr., John 
Kirby Davis, Leslie David Newell Davis, Huntington Townsend Day, Charles 
Minot Dole, Robert Parker Dudley, Thomas Wells Durant, Thomas Paul 
Durivan (ex-1921), Caleb Francis Eddy, Ray Palmer Foote, John Stuart Gor- 
don, Thomas Dudley Green, Freeman Higgins (ex-1919), Lawrence James 
Kane, George Edward Roberts Lawrence (1920), Duer McLanahan (1918), 
Harry Reinhard Marshall, Oliver Clayton Mosman, Jr., (1920), Bennet Bron- 
son Murdock, John Sabine Owen, 2d, Albert Lacy Russel, Hayden Newhall 
Smith, Wayland Farries Vaughan, Thomas Vennum, Oliver Mayhew Whipple, 
Lawrence WTiittemore W T iley (1920). 

Sheffield Scientific School — George Reily Bailey, Rowland Higby Ban- 
nister, Kenneth Boxley Bolton (ex-1919), Morgan Horsfall Brewster, Ernest 
Linwood Davis, Jr., (ex-1920), Robert Finney, Franklin Addison Flanders, 
Antonio Manuel Fresneda, Floyd Charles Furlow, Jr. (ex-1920), George Wash- 
ington Houk (ex-1920), John Talbott Houk, Bruce Porter Hyde, Drayton Alex- 
ander Mayers, (1920), William Henry Meyer (ex-1917), Thomas Daniel Nee- 
lands, Jr. (1920), Charles Stewart Parker, Leander Holden Poor, Ernest Dalton 
Richmond, Jr. (1920), Wilford Lawrence Rumney, George Edwin Spitzmiller, 
Alpheus Beede Stickney 2nd, Harold Burton Whipp, Thomas Herbert Young, 
Jr. 



STUDENTS 



CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT 



CLASS I-SENIORS 



NAMES 

Allaben, Marshall Champion, Jr. 
Anderson, John Morrissey Paul 
Andrew, Edwin Howard 
Andrews, George Davis, Jr. 
Am, Fred, Jr. 
Bacigalupo, John Louis 
Baldwin, James Todd 
Bartlett, Calvin Page 
Bartow, Nevett Steele, Jr. 
Bates, Theodore Lewis 
Bemis, Grosvenor 
Bent, Dana Parker 
Bernardin, Winton Mariotte 
Boardman, Bradford 
Bolster, Marshall Grant 
Bovey, Martin Koon 
Brayton, Anthony 
Bricken, Fay Erskine 
Burbridge, George Kellar 
Burnham, Bradford Hinckley 
Chase, Cornelius Thurston, Jr. 
Childs, Ralph de Someri 
Colby, Marshall Hartranft 
Coleman, John Guion 
Colgate, Robert Bangs 
Correa, Edgardo Alvarez 
Daniels, Paul Clement 
Davis, Ferdinand Hermann 
Dole/ Alexander Watters 
Duffy, Edward Stephen 
Elder, Samuel James 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 14 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Phillips 19 


Banbury, Conn. 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Chattanooga, Tenn. 


Mrs. Peet's 


Chattanooga, Tenn. 


Mrs. Peet's 


Reading 


Reading 


Chestnut Hill 


Bartlet 20 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


Bartlet 20 


South Orange, N. J. 


Bartlet 26 


New Haven, Conn. 


Bartlet 4 


Chestnut Hill 


Bartlet 19 


Reading 


Pemberton 2 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Bishop 2 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Phillips 18 


West Newton 


Taylor 18 


M inneapolis, Minn . 


Mr. Johnson's 


Fall River 


Phillips 3 


Shelby ville, Ky. 


Draper 2 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 29 


Cambridge 


Pemberton 5 


Lynn 


Bancroft 17 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Phillips 21 


I/)s Angeles, Cal. 


Day 10 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 1 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 1 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Albion, N. Y. 


Bartlet 3 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 13 


Bangor, Me. 


Bishop 23 


Lawrence 


Mrs. Peet's 


Winchester 


Mrs. Dole's 



88 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Etheridge, Hugh Pierrepont 


r» t - 

oalem 


ADDOt lo 


rellows, Woodward 


( hicago, til. 


liisnop z(J 


relske, Charles Longford 


Kokomo, Ina. 


Mr. Mc Curdy s 


Fentress, Thomas Lyon 


Huooard woods, Itl. 


MTS. Holt S 


rerris, Walter Kockwood, Jr. 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Day 16 


Fine, John Van Antwerp 


Princeton, A.J. 


rnmips 14 


TT* l A f „ 1 1 TT 1 

rrost, Malcolm Hovenden 


Lawrence 


Bancroft 3 


Gordon, VNilliam Alexander. 3d 


Flushing, X. Y. 


Mrs. Jackson s 


Mall, Lliot Cordon 


Winihrop 


Mrs. Castle s 


rieidei, Warren Clark 


Middletown, Lonn. 


Andover 1 


xiiiaiten, Alan Audley 


lironxriue, .\ . 1 . 


Miss Cheever's 


Ingham, Frederick Watson 


Kansas City, Mo. 


rnillips 11 


Jameson, John Denison 


Branford, Conn. 


TJ1 Ml* „ o 

rnillips 8 


January, Derick Algernon 


or. Loins, Mo. 


Day 24 


Johnson, Albert Lincoln, Jr. 


Hamburg, A . 2 . 


Bartlet 16 


Keitn, Allen 


Southport, Conn. 


rJartiet xb 


xkenaail, David Wal bridge 


Princeton, N. J. 


Hancroit 18 


Keyes, Langley Carleton 


IT inchest er 


T"\ , r t J) 

Uay iz 


Knapp, Howard Clay 


Vincennes, Ind. 


Bishop 18 


TV" „ 1 1 T „ T> 11 _1_ T_ 

Konler, James Pollock, Jr. 


Tl 1 | XT T7 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bishop 26 


Lacey, George Henry Patterson 


A astwiue, lenn. 


rJartiet 1U 


Lamson, Samuel Abbott 


T ~- „77 

Lowell 


Eaton 4 


Lawton, Richard Sigmund 


^ 7- - - _ _ 777 

C nicago, ill. 


Bishop 31 


Learned, W illiam Hallam 


If atertown, A . 1 . 


oisnop zy 


Ledyard, Augustus C anfield 


Lfetroit, Mien. 


Abbot / 


Lincoln, Louis Augustus 


Mansjiela 


Abbot 4 


T ^ 4- -L 1 „ /" 1 1 \ T T 

Little, Charles Joseph 


Lvanston, III. 


Bishop 7 


Lunt, Clarence Sumner, Jr. 


aoctiester, A . 1 . 


rnillips lz 


Aicv^ormiCK, Jtooert iMiiott 


reoria, 111. 


Liark 1U 


Macdonald, Allan Houston 


Lawrence 


TA ,. , . t r. 

Day lo 


A \ n ~ _ _ TT ^ . J ..11 T* 1 , 

Planning, Birdsall I nomas 


(. armel, A . 1 . 


Draper 6 


Mason, George Allen, Jr. 


Highland Bark, III. 


Clark 13 


\fc>T.^ll T Troll 

ALermi, jl\ au 


Summit, N. J . 


1 a\ lor lo 


Merryweather, John 


JJ^nhl ... A 7>„ _7. 777 

Highland rark, III. 


Clark 13 


Morgan, William Arthur, Jr. 


Buffalo, y. Y. 


Bishop 35 


Morse, Daniel Stuart 


Lexington, Ky. 


Draper 2 


Aoyes, Harold Beecher 


Trenton, N. J. 


Bancroft 18 


J. dllle, -TYllicU MI11LC 


New Haven, Conn. 


FtoT>+le>f 1Q 

Darxiet is 


Parkhurst, Leonard Woods 


Wilkes Barre, Pa. 


Day 14 


Pfaffmann, Karl Slade 


Quincy 


Phillips 13 



68 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


lUIC, X AC 111 y OLlCl, A>\1 


11 Ul o yrlfiys, V 11. 


Flo\7 Oft 


T*rntt F,rlw5irrl TTfirri« 

X liitt, X~4U.Wd.lU XXdl 1 


Wp11p*1ph TTilh 


Alls. X HIIOW 3 


■ 1 1 iY\- 1% xxcui xviiiiudii 


Sh/vrt TlilU N 1 


Pemberton 6 


RAQpnnaiim William lYTrvrTKa 

JTVUoCilUdLllll, TYlJlldllt jJlUl I i~ 


TXf, nfin m ptp T. T ?V7 V 
rv uuiLfit/vr&f xj* x., iv ■ x 


PViillirto 99 
X IlHlips XX 


Rnvsp .TnVin HTnllpr 


Tpttp. TJnufp Iwfl 

J. Ci t O XI \JbW>VO, X /MX* 


X (X I X til r 


^f»r»t+ Walter Dnvirl 


X/vrMX/v/f'j iV . XX. 


I 1111 lips X / 


OCcU 9) XVlClldliX XXdlvcj' 


\jitiivuf vtvyt' 


! >dl IR L 1 1 


OXit:! ltxdll, ixlUt/l L XJttloXCj' 


Npm Ttnphp]]p N V 


lVXlS. JTCCU S 


mr^nm At+Viiit T?r»wltinrl 
OH CD 111 5 xT. I til 111 XV<J VY Id 11 LI 


1/f/i 7/7 /?t> 

JJX LI I tit ft 


n flV 1 
uay i 


O L dill 9 1>I CIl 111 d 11 xV Mi dill 


IXc/lt/i, XV. XX ■ 


ivxio. xyoic o 


kJtC VCILjj VJ UUl M 1T1U1 I UYY j *Jvl 


Jlyfixill V €// llXJtl, it . X • 


Ppn sp 10 


Tyler, IMorris 


New HdVBTl CoTtYl* 


Abbot fi 


Weber, Herbert Jacob 


Chicago, III. 


villi JV C 


Wells, George Burnham 


Southbridge 


X 11 111 1JJ5> 1.) 


Whitelock, Otto von Stockhausen New York, N. Y. 


Miss Park's 


York, Samuel Albert, Jr. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Pease 12 




Seniors — 87 




CLASS II- 


—UPPER MIDDLERS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 




iVew Bedford 


Mr. Quinby's 


Blair, Harry Mitchell, Jr. 


Chicago, III. Mr. L. C. Newton's 


Borg, John Simon 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 11 


Bright, Robert Douglas 


Sandwich 


Mr. Stott's 


Carpenter, William James 


Salem, Ohio Mr. McCurdy's 


Clark, Kempton 


Brookline 


Bishop 11 


Cole, Horace Wellington 


West Newton 


Taylor 18 


Conant, Loring 


Dedham 


Miss Park's 


Coon, Carleton Stevens 


Wakefield 


Taylor 12 


Duffield, Dickinson Curtis 


South Orange, N. J. 


Adams 12 


Dwight, William 


Holyoke 


Eaton 1 


Elsbree, Hugh Langdon 


Preston Hollow, N. Y. 






Mrs. Wainwright's 


Euston, Alexander 


Scranton, Pa. 


Taylor 8 


Faeth, Perry Edward 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Andover 4 


Fairleigh, William Macdonald 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bartlet 29 


Gleason, John MacArthur 


Manchester, N. H. 


Day 10 


Gray, Burton Payne 


Newton Centre 


Woods 8 


Greene. William 


Denver, Colo. 


Day 28 



70 



NAMES 

Hale, Thomas, 3d 

Hamilton, John Gordon 

Hammond, Luther Salem, Jr. 

Hapgood, Richard Locke 

Haviland, Roger Brush 

Hayes, Bartlett Harding. Jr. 

Hill, John Edward 

Hogg, William Cecil 

Hudner, Harold Kennedy 

Ives, John Othniel 

Johns, John 

Jones, David Calhoun 

Knight, Owen Bealle, Jr. 

Knox, John Andrew 

Ludlam, George P, 2d 

MacMahan, Horace Ford 

Nichols, Barrett Campbell 

Otis, Raymond 

Paget, Harold Alan 

Parker, Allen Russell, Jr. 

Parnall, William Edward 

Pearson. Alfred Kittredge 

Perry, Randolph Hight 

Randall, Stuart Percy 

Reifschneider, Henry 

Robbins, Charles Henry Darlington, Jr. 

Ross, Hiram Goodrich 

Russell, Donald 

Ryan, Cyril Cunningham 

Sharretts, Thaddeus Stevens, Jr. 

Spook, Benjamin McLane 

Stevenson, Theodore Dwight 

Stillman, Charles Latimer 

Taylor, George Chadbourne. Jr. 

Thornton, Oliver Cromwell 

Van Wyck. George Lee 

Wheelock, Frederic Melvin 

Willard, Henry Augustus, 2d. 

Wilson, Alfred Mayo 

Wilson, Donald Beckles 

Wingate, Roy Wilson, Jr. 



RESIDENCES 
Yonkers, N. Y. 

Sew York, S. Y. 
Winneika, III. 
Cambridge 
Glover grille, N. Y 
Andover 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Fall River 
Meriden, Conn. 



ROOMS 

Mr. Tower's 
Day 29 
Day So 
Draper 6 
Day 22 
Phillips Street 
Andover 9 
Taylor 6 
Day 8 
Mr. McCurdy's 



Bay side, L. I., S. Y. Miss Cheever's 

St. Louis, Mo. Day 4 

S/. Joseph, Mo. Mr. Johnson's 

Sew Canaan, Conn. Andover 5 

Sew York, S. Y. Adams 7 
Sew York, S. Y. Mrs. Wainwright's 

Bath, Me. Day 38 

Chicago, III. Bartlet 18 

Sew York, S. Y. Cement 12 

Wellesley Hills Adams 18 

Ann Arbor, Mich. Miss Carter's 

Gardner Adams 24 

Andover 70 Elm Street 

Holyoke Pemberton 3 

Brooklyn. S. Y. Bishop 3 

New York, S Y. Bartlet 13 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak. Day 17 

Mercer, Pa. Pease 14 

Freeport, L. I., S. Y. Adams 2 

Plainjield, S. J. Phillips 7 

Sew Haven, Conn. Day 27 

Princeton, S. J. Bartlet 17 

Sew York, S. Y. Adams 8 

Pelham, S. Y. Draper 5 

Kansas City, Mo. Taylor 2o 

Belmont Pemberton 2 

Lawrence Lawrence 

Washington, D. C. Bartlet 8 
Minneapolis, Minn. Mr. McCurdy's 

Summit, S. J. Taylor 16 

Arlington, S. J. Bartlet 12 



Upper Mtddlers — 5i 



71 



CLASS III— 


LOWER MIDDLERS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Bennett, Meridan Hunt 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bishop 29 


Bradshaw, Hugh Edwin 


Winchester 


Dr. Stearns's 


Brandman, Harry Schiller 


New York, N. Y. 


Abbot 14 


Brosseau, Louis Pierre 


Santa Barbara, Cal. Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Button, Frank Edwin 


Brandon, Vt. 


Mrs. Holt's 


Clark, Ray Butler 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Dole's 


Clough, Charles Asa, Jr. 


Vineyard Haven 


Hardy 1 


Daley, Leo Francis 


Andover 14 Bartlet Street 


DeLuca, Theodore 


Andover 


Day 3 


Dewire, Thomas Andrew, Jr. 


Cambridge 


Bishop 31 


Dunkle, Robert Johnston, Jr. 


Brookline 


Bancroft 11 


Durgin, James Henry 


Bradford 


Tucker 3 


Elwell, Richard Derby 


New York, N. Y. 


Clark 11 


Foster, Willard R S 


Schenectady, N. Y . 


Churchill 3 


Gray, Donald McPherson 


Newton Centre 


Abbot 9 


Grover, Donald Broughton 


West Newbury 


Adams 3 


Hales, Kenneth Adair 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 28 


Hannum, Robert Read 


Boston 


Bancroft 4 


Heath, Ellis Kendrick 


Worcester 


Bishop 2 


Hobson, William Langhorne, Jr. 


New York, N . 1 . 


Taylor 24 


Holmes, Ralph Milton 


Bradford 


Bishop 2 


Hubbard, Langdon 


Grosse Pointe, Mich. 


Phillips 20 


Husband, Richard Borgman 


Hanover, N. H. 


Woods 6 


Hutt, John Richard 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Mrs. Castle's 


Huttig, John 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Adams 15 


Insley, Francis Henry 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Adams 10 


Ives, Stanley Hoyt 


nroofclyn, iv. / . 


Bancroit o 


Jackson, Otis Goodwin 


Medford 


Taylor 17 


Johnson, Richard Vernon 


Lynn 


Adams 11 


Jordan, Robert 


Cape Elizabeth, Me. 


Bishop 3 


Lewis, Whitney Connor 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Bishop 21 


Little, Joseph Simpson 


West Nutley, N. J. 


Mr. Stott's 


Martin, James 


Newtonville 


Bartlet 17 


Martin, Robert Clement 


Boston 


Mrs. Roberts's 


May, Thayer Thomas 


Memphis, Term. 


Clark 2 


Morrison, Clarence Edwin, Jr. 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Reiner, Richard 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Day 5 


Riley, W'illiam Charles 


Bristol, Conn. 


Clark 8 


Rogers, Irving Emerson 


Lawrence 


Taylor 21 



72 



NAMES RESIDENCES ROOMS 



Sargent, Paul Brainerd 


Winchester 


Mrs. Gardner's 


Sherman, Edgar Jay, 2d 




Adams 17 


Sherrill, Leicester Hay den 


Jrnuaaelpnia, ra. 


Taylor 17 


Snultis, Mark, 2d 




Adams 17 


Snurtleif, Merrill, Jr. 


Lancaster, DJ . ti. 


Adams 6 


Silver, Henry Mann 




Adams 1 


smitnam, 1 nomas 


Maucn isnunfe, ra. 


Mr. Tower's 


Stern, Jesse Myron 


Lfiestnut tluL 


Clement 4 


lenney, Utis rilack 


tioutton, Me. 


Day 26 


Ireadway, Cnarles lerry, Jr. 


Bristol, Conn. 


Clark o 


Walker, Donald Kimball 


Lynn 


Andover 6 


Wallace, Frederic William 


riainjieia, iV . J . 


L,iark / 


Wasserman, Milton 


New York, IS. Y. 


remberton 1 




Sinhnt Vn 

I.3U.UUL, V it. 


x. ciilUcI I Oil O 


Wells, Frederick Chapin 


Chicago, III. Mr. 


L. C. Newton's 


Wood, Cornelius Van Ness 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Day 32 


Wright, Cyrus Gordon 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Taylor 15 



Lower Middlers — 56 



CLASS IV— JUNIORS 



NAMES 

Aguinaldo, Emilio, Jr. 
Aida, Taro 

Alcaide, Otto Antonio 
Alexander, Jay Cooke 
Allen, Richard Bedford 
Anderson, Robert Palmer 
Avery, Ledyard, Jr. 
Bartlett, Latham Herschel 
Battershill, Allan John 
Bigelow, Victor Stoddard 
Bishop, Stephen Hunter 
Bonney, Orvis Weston 
Brigham, Robert Evans 
Brown, Gordon Kenneth 
Bruce, James Gould 
Bull, Benjamin Seth Jr. 
Bumstead, Donald Douglas 
Burnham, DeWitt Kinne 



RESIDENCES ROOMS 

Manila, P. I. Taylor 22 

Yokohama, Japan Miss Carter's 

Brookline Williams Hall 

Media, Pa. Williams Hall 
Andover Rocky Hill Road 

Noank, Conn. Williams Hall 

Belmar, N. J. Miss Carter's 

St. Joseph, Mo. Tucker 1 

Lawrence Lawrence 

Andover 7 Locke Street 

Newton Centre Adams 5 

Bath, Me. Williams Hall 

Boston Taylor 26 

West Swanzey, N. H. Williams Hall 

Syracuse, N. Y. Williams Hall 

Minneapolis, Minn. Taylor 9 

Brookline Adams 16 
Berkeley, Cal. Mr. L. C. Newton's 



73 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Burton, Malcolm King 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Adams 22 


Burton, Myron Simmons 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Adams 22 


Butler, Frank James 


Tin *inn 


Adams 9 


Buttrick, Allan Winfield 


A Y) n r\Vi £>-r 


lo wolcott Ave. 


Capra, Pietro Jerry 


rjjiyi6WOOCL f iv. «/. 


Bishop 15 


Carter, Richard Augustine, Jr. 




Miss Carter's 


Case, George Bowen, Jr. 


1j rtylt UOUCly IV • U • 


Adams 8 


Chang, Sinley Kong Yuen 


r PlPinnn thim n 


Element io 


Chrisman, Earle Henry 


RnnlfnrtP Wn^h 


lvxiss v>neever s 


Clark, William Glenn 


Win oh p vfpr 

TV I'lVXJll'WlrG'l 


Adams 14 


Clemons, Eliot Goodwin 


WW (A tit J vcUJs 


Adams 9 


Cooke, Anson Leonard 


MJnXwi tsl tOC? 


Lawrence 


Cox. Orin Kelsey 


WW Ut&riAJ U/fl t KsUflfl. 


r>isnop si 


Dunsford, Bevan 


thpl-m Qfnrn 


Farrar 5 


Dunsford, Harold 


Chelmsford 


Williams Hall 


Erskine, Frank Gurney 


Brockton 


Williams Hall 


Escamilla, Manuel 


Manila, P. I. 


Tucker 4 


Esty, Thomas Cushing, Jr. 


Amherst 


Williams Hall 


Foxwell, Richard Strong 


Camden, Me. 


Williams Hall 


French, Philip Roland, Jr. 


Andover 276 South Main Street 


Friedberger, Theodore Stanton 


New York, N. Y. 


Tucker 4 


Fritchman, Horatio Lloyd 


Indiana, Pa. 


Taylor 2 


Gay, William Campbell 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Gordon, Lewis Henderson 


Flushing, N. Y. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Graham, David 


Steubenville, Ohio 


Churchill 5 


Greene, Roger Denise 


Denver, Colo. 


Mrs. Peet's 


Grinnell, Richard Clark 


Mount Vernon, N. Y. Mr. Stott's 


Guthe, Otto Emmor 


Ann Arbor, Mich. 


Woods 5 


Harriman, Lawrence Manning 


North Wilmington 


Churchill 2 


Hart, Kenneth Joseph 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Mr. Tower's 


Healy, George Paul 


Chicago, III. 


Williams Hall 


Hodges, Richard Burt 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Williams Hall 


Holt, Reginald Woodbury 


Andover 


74 Bartlet Street 


Horner, Horace Mansfield 


New Haven, Conn. 


Mr. Quinby's 


Howarth, Francis George 


Oxford 


Tucker 5 


Howell, Hampton Pierson, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Farrar 5 


Johnson John Crittenden 


Hamburg, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Kaffenburgh, Donald 


Brookline 


Mr. Tower's 


Karnheim, Charles Frederick 


Brookline 


Churchill 2 


Kern, Alfred Dean 


Portland, Me. 


Taylor 19 



74 



NAMES 

Larsen, George Harriman 
La Tulippe, Aime Augustine 
Macdonald, Victor Ronald 
McKinlay, Robert Emmons 
Mercer, Aymer Turnbull 
Mills, Hiram Francis 
Monsarrat, Nicholas Graves 
Murphy, Charles Barney Gould 
Newman, Winthrop Randall 
Norton, Wilbur Herbert 
Palmer, Harry Wells, Jr. 
Phillips, Montague Burrell 
Piza, Emilio Edgar 
Pratt, Carroll Wheeler 
Puffer, Winthrop Meigs 
Ralston, Roger Brookes 
Reinhart, Alan David 
Remington, Harry George 
Renouf, Henry Charles 
Rochow, Oscar Otto 
Rogers, John 
Sawyer, Bradley Moynan 
Seymour, Ford de Villiars 

Slagle, Roy Edward 
Sternbergh, Regis Springer 
Stewart, William Alexander 
Stillman, Leland Stanford, Jr. 
Stone, Gilbert Hotchkiss 
Stone, Knowlton Davies 
Strickland, William Alexander 
Swartz, Benjamin Kinsell 
Taff, William Walter, Jr. 
Taylor, John D'Auby Higgins 
Thomas, Paul Fifield 
Thompson, Elmer Gildersleeve 
Trevvett, Walter Egan 
Tsai, Kuo Fong 
Turner, Benner Creswill 
Tutein, Ernest Arthur, Jr. 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Brookline 


L/Iement o 


Lawrence 


Bishop 15 


TT if 7 ft "_ 

Hartford, Conn. 


Jremberton 1 


i oniteri, is . I . 


xarrar o 


Andover 


Williams Hall 


Waitsjield, Vt. 


Adams 16 


Cleveland, Unto 


41 balem btreet 


n,,„L __. AT 77 

Durham, is . ti. 


wniiams xiau 


Andover 


121 Elm Street 


Hampton, N. H. 


Phillips 20 


New York, N. Y. Mrs. Wainwright's 


Peterborough, N. H. 


Clement 1 


San Jose, Costa Rica 


Dr. Stearns's 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Bancroft 7 


Medford 


Adams 11 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Peet's 


Brookline 


Mr. Stott's 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Williams Hall 


Andover 


45 Abbot Street 


Lancaster, Pa. 


Bishop 22 


Kennebunk, Me. 


Tucker 2 


Maiden 


Hardy 5 


Morrisburg, Ont., Canada 




Williams Hall 


Lima, Ohio 


Williams Hall 


Reading, Pa. 


Phillips 10 


Galveston, Texas 


Mrs. Gardner's 


New York, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Andover 


1 Locke Street 


Andover 


1 Locke Street 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Upper Montclair, N. J. Taylor 10 


Brookline 


Adams 21 


New York, N. Y. 


Clement 8 


Brookline 


Adams 21 


Manhasset, L. I., N. Y. Churchill 4 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Tucker 3 


Tientsin, China 


Taylor 13 


Columbus, Ga. 


Abbot 17 


Winchester 


Williams Hall 



75 







ROOMS 


Vose, rid ward Rich 


bast Laaington, Me. 


TT J.J 

Hardy 4 


Wade, Charles Alexander, Jr. 


rousviue, l a. 


Clement 7 


Waldo, Centry Chilton 


Houston, Texas 


Williams Hall 


TI7_11 A 1 1 XT 1_ 

Waller, Absalom Nelson 


Washington, D. C. 


Bishop 14 


Whiting, Arthur bt. John, Jr. 


Framingham 


/"II L.*ll A 

Churchill 4 


Williams, Arthur Ashley, Jr. 


Holliston 


Williams Hall 


Williams, James Rufus 


Glastonbury, Conn. 


Abbot 5 


Juniors 


— 104 




SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT 


CLASS A- 


SENIORS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Acheson, Edward Campion, Jr. 


Middletown, Conn. 


Bancroft 6 


Akerley, Elmer Charles 


Reading 


Mrs. Peet's 


Ames, Azel, Jr. 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Bartlet 29 


Atwood, Gordon Ernest 


Whitman 


Bancroft 4 


Becker, John Leonard 


Chicago, III. 


Bishop 19 


Billings, Asa White Kenney, Jr. 


Vineyard Haven 


Bartlet 2 


Rlnrlcrpti" ^/pntwnrtVi Piitnnm 

UlU'Uct LLj M \ lit T> V.'l til A 11 1*1.1 dill 


West Newton 


Bancroft 16 


Rriipp l)r»nnm WsnnwrityVit 

I'l U VA j Jt/l/lldlU » T lllllTTllilllL 


Lawrence 


Bancroft 3 


Bulkley, Charles Griswold 


Springfield 


Pease 9 


Bush, Denzil Sidney 


E. Orange, N. J. Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Carmichael, Allan Russell 


New Haven, Conn. 


Miss Park's 


Cheney, Marvin Chapin 


Southbridge 


Bartlet 23 


Cleveland, Edwin Clarence 


Webster 


Abbot 4 


Clough, Robert Morrill 


Reading 


Phillips 19 


Comfort, Lowell Rutherford 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 35 


Crosby, Franklin Muzzy, Jr. 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Abbot 6 


Crosby, Moreau Stephen 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Clement 3 


Davidson, Robert Cooper 


Coraopolis, Pa. 


Taylor 27 


Downing, William Chappell, Jr. 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Mr. Chandler's 


Dupont, Joseph Cyrille 


Houma, La. 


Miss Cheever's 


D'Wolf, James Francis 


Bristol, R. I. 


Bartlet 28 


Eiseman, Philip 


Boston 


Mr. Stott's 


Farnsworth, Vincent, Jr. 


Winchester 


Bishop 4 


Fitch, Louis Henry, Jr. 


Newton Centre 


Day 25 


Fletcher, Paris 


Middlebury, Vt. 


Mr. McCurdy's 



76 







ROOMS 


Creene, Kdward McVitty, Jr. 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


oartiet y 


Hanley, Edward James 


11"/, • j 

W human 


nancroit 10 


Hansen, Magnus Christian 


Vejle, Denmark 


Clement y 


mils, Hidward Hamilton 


Brooklyn, iv . i . 


T>__j.1_j. to 

oartiet it 


Hock, Norman rrederic 


rottsnlle, ra. 


Phillips 1 


Hopkins, John Milton 


Morristown, N. J. 


rnillips 4 


Hulbert, rred Manon 


Everett, Wash. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Kloman, Francis Ray 


iV etc / 0T«\ iV . i . 


Andover 2 


Lamborn, Richard 


It Chester, ra. 


Mrs. Dole s 


Ledyard, Henry, Jr. 


Detroit, Mich. 


AODOt / 


Loomis, Kiehard Albert 


Cleveland, Uhw 


Day 18 


Lucas, Joseph Wilson, Jr. 


Philadelphia, ra. 


-Bartlet x5 


MacPherson, (jrardner rJlake 


Brookline, 


rJancroft 10 


Neil, Edward Joseph, Jr. 


Methuen 


Adams 3 


Patten, James Richard 


Kolcomo, Ind. 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Patterson, Henry Clay, Jr. 


i oungsvuie, iv . r . 


JJay 15 


Perry, James Whipple 


tLimira, i\ . i . 


ADDOt O 


Renfrew, Alan Spaulding 


TT,... ,,_L *J1 

Haverhill 


T > i.T „ i ar% 

Uartlet 30 


xveynolds, Jidlwood Webster 


H'esz Chester, ra. 


r p„ .^i ^« i i 
lay lor 14 


Kicn, Herbert Clarence 


Lawrence 


rnillips xz 


Riegel, Frank Herman 


Bethlehem, ra. 


Draper 3 


Robbins, James Stanton 


N augatuck, Conn. 


.Bancroft lo 


Koberts, Karl btewart 


1 1 'i_r 7 

Miljora 


Dr. btearns s 


Roblin, John Hopper 


M atervuet, i\ . i . 


Andover 2 


Q 1 f* Cl _x 

banders, (jeorge btewart 


Dorchester 


Bartlet 2 


bcheide, Philip William 


TT ..if 7 

Hartford, Conn. 


TV . O 

Day 8 


bearles, Charles Colden 


/tL • „ Tii 

Chicago, III. 


Bartlet 7 


bmith, Kenneth Jbaker 


Montclair, A. ./. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Stearns, Roger Vinton 


Dunkirk, N. Y. 


Bartlet 30 


bteinbacn, Milton 


New Haven, Conn. 






Mrs. Wainwright's 


Ct« , TT „ 1 A T ...-.11 

strong, Harold Lovell 


Binghamton, N. Y. 


Pease 11 


lalmage, *rank Mathias 


Great Barrington 


Eaton 2 


luttie, l nomas worraii 


N augatuck, Conn. 


Bancroft 15 


Underbill, John Ldspenard 


Warsaw, N. Y. 


Farrar 4 


Vogelgesang, Shepard 


New London, Conn. 


Churchill 6 


Weaver, Alan Vigneron 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 6 


Wight, Ira Edward, Jr. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Phillips 1 



Seniors — 62 



77 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLERS 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Adams, Francis Fiske 


Andover 


o lviorton street 


Annis, Perley IV^ason 


Stoneham 


Mr. McCurdy's 


Anthony, IVIalcolm Talbot 


Norwell 


r nunps if 


Askew, Ralph Kirk, Jr. 


Kansas City, Mo. 


laylor 25 


Atha, Henry George 


Groton, Conn. 


x nunps o 


r>atty, xteginaia i^utnoert 


Iltinr, AT V 

u tica, iv . i . 


Mr. L/nandler s 


Black, George Kelleher 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Booth, Howard Miason 


Worcester 


Day 2 


Bordages, Cecil Phillip 


Beaumont, Texas 


Mrs. Farlow's 


urace, juioyu L/evviiT. 


West Newton 


Eaton 6 


Bunting, James Ernest, Jr. 


Flushing, N. Y. 


Phillips 7 


Burns, James Ferguson 


Colorado Springs, Colo Bartlet 7 


uutier, ivicnara Aioert 


Boston 


Phillips 6 


T^ntlcr RrkVxvH- Willi-m-i 

Duuer, xvODerx vviuiam 


Methuen 


Bishop 28 


JJUl tCl L! C 1 U , X ACIIl y TT oUS W KJ1 til 


Hollywood, Cal. 


Mr. Chandler's 


i^anton, Ji/awaro. wnitiocK 


Andover 


67 Central St. 


Clark, Alexander Bierce, Jr. 


Canton, Ohio 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Cotter, Augustine Joseph 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Coykendall, John Eastland 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Day 9 


Cushman, Burritt Alden 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Day 36 


Damon, Russell Lawrence 


Cranford, N. J. 


Bancroft 12 


Danielson, Thomas Baxter 


Danielson, Conn. 


Bancroft 16 


ueuei, v^nanes rreaericK, sa 


Amherst 


Abbot 16 


Dickson, Richard Malcolm 


Holyoke 


Bishop 23 


Draper, Lenard Ames 


Duluth, Minn. 


Pease 9 


Drew, Garfield Albee 


East Dedham 


Taylor 7 


Evans, Thomas 


East Moriches, L. I., N. Y. Phillips 8 


Fanning, David Greene 


Hingham Centre 


Pemberton 5 


Ferguson, Robert Robertson 


Paducah, Ky. 


Bishop 8 


Gage, Charles Stafford 


Westfield, N. J. 


Bartlet 3 


Gelbach, Kurt Louis 


Hoboken, N. J. 


Miss Cheever's 


Gourley, Stuart 


Waban 


Eaton 4 


Greene, Franklin Irvine 


Denver, Colo. 


Day 23 


Hardy, Frederick Knowlton 


West Newton 


Hardy 3 


XXd VCiXlCj' CI , O vjllll I ItxllIY, .) 1 • 


Ardsley-on-Hudson, N. Y. Clement 6 


Hegeler, Hartley 


Huntington, L.I.,< 


!V. Y. Bishop 11 


Henderson, Malcolm Colby 


New Haven, Conn. 


Clark 9 


Hibbard, Frederick William 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Holmes, David Blodgett 


Janestrille, Wis 


Day 21 



78 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Hopkins, Francis Wayland 


Keeseville, N. Y. 


Taylor 20 


Howard, John Thomas 


Lawrence 


Adams 9 


Hubbard, Gilbert 


Newton Centre 


Bishop 1 


Keith, Glen William 


Claremore, Okla. 


Bancroft 17 


Kemp, Wilfred Arthur 


Methuen 


Day 9 


Kimberly, John Bobbins 


Neenah, Wis. 


Day 34 


Koehler, Herman Jules, Jr. 


East Orange, N. J. 




Kohler, John Michael 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 27 




Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Kohler, Walter J, Jr. 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 4 


Leach, Donald Wallace 


Middletovm, Conn. 


Pemberton 6 


McGee, Norman Schoonmaker 


Plainfield, N. J. 


Miss Cheever's 


McGregor, Gordon 


Haverhill 


Bishop 24 


Mclnnes, Duncan 


Bath, Me. 


Bishop 33 


McPherson, John Hoover 


West Medford 


Taylor 10 


Manning, Conant 


Upper Montclair, N. J. Eaton 1 


Mansfield, Norman Lathrop 


Hillsboro, N. H. 


Bishop 36 


Marks, Kenneth Weale 


Elmira, N. Y. 


Taylor 11 


Mitchell, Ronald Alexander 


Stafford Springs, Conn. Miss Park's 


Moon, James Southworth 


Cranford, N. J. 


Bancroft 12 


Munger, Robert Louis 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Miss Cheever's 


Neidlinger, Newell George 


East Orange, N. J. 


Abbot 15 


Nicola, Oliver Peter, Jr. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Phillips 2 


Onthank, Pierce 


Fitchburg 


Bartlet 15 


Osborne, Stanley de Jongh 


Guatemala City, Guatemala Andover 3 


Peckett, Robert Plympton, Jr. 


Franconia, N. H. 


Bartlet 9 


Place, Herbert Miller 


Cortland, N. Y. 


Phillips 15 


Prendergast, William Augustine 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Clement 1 


Ramsey, John Patterson, Jr. 


Charlotte, Vt. 


Day 6 


Ranger, Casper, 2d 


Eolyolce 


Miss Cheever's 


Reed, Dana Leslie 


Andover 


Andover 


Richardson, Thomas Peter de Quartel 


Germantown, Pa. 


Bartlet 25 


Robinson, Sumner Jennings 


Wollaston 


Taylor 28 


Robinson, Willard Marshall Law 


Cambridge, N. Y. 


Bishop 27 


Sahler, Carl Philip 


Harlingen, N. J. 


Eaton 2 


Sanborn, John Webster 


Andover 


5 Locke Street 


Sawyer, John Parker 


Lowell 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Serat, William Seth 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Andover 4 


Sexsmith, Henry Perry 


Binghamton, N. Y. 


Mr. Quinby's 


Shepard, John Sanford, Jr. 


Franklin, N. H. 

79 


Bishop 21 



NAMES 


A Mtmrn JL U Ha 1^ \s Hj 9 


ROOMS 


hmail, Joseph 1 nomas 


Bath, Me. 


Day 33 


Snow, Howard 


Vnrthoro \J V 

i onicers, iv . / . 


uay oo 


Stevens, Kenneth Hooker 


Larchmont Manor, N 


i. Day zl 


Stillman, Edgar Chapman 


l roy, iv . i . 


Woods 7 


otiiweli, r\eil v^onwell 


Anderson, Ind. 


f\ __J_ A 

Vvlark 4 


Tichnor, Arthur Rudolph 




uay zu 


i uison, oaxDy lviene 


ran itiver 


Mrs. Roberts's 


lrasei, JUiawara ijreorge, Jr. 


T>W*lr.Anlnl*Z r , V> r, 

rnilaaelptiia, ra. 


JtJartlet 16 


Upson, Charles Hiram 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Miss Cheever's 


Van ratten, Wuliam James 


AT „ V~„l. XT V" 

New York, iV. i . 


r hillips 9 


wight, JJamei rawing 


of. LOUIS, MO. 


r hillips z 


Wilde, JNelson lumball 


Georgetown 


nancroit 4 


Williams, David Payson 


Q L ~~~~~ D „ 

onaron ra. 


Day 2 


Wintersteen, Frederic Xobias 


Port Carbon, Pa. 


Bancroft 5 


Wraith, William, Jr. 


XT .„„ W»«I. XT V 

New York, I\. i . 


Adams 2 


wngnt, i nomas Clarice 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


P1oi.It ft 

t^iarK o 


xorK, vroraon roiiette 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Ho i>f lot ift 
Dartiet io 


Young, Charles Willard, Jr. 


South Orange, N. J. 


Pease 11 


Young, Howard Gilbert 


Holyoke 


Clark 14 


Upper Middlers — 97 




CLASS C 


— LOWER MIDDLERS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Abernathy, James Logan 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Adams id 


Allen, Daniel 


Cheshire, Conn. 


Taylor 3 


Allen, Robert Gray 


Andover, 


J aylor 4 


Anable, Henry Milton 


Spring Lake, N. J. 


Churchill 5 


Appel, Joseph Herbert, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


i^larlc Iz 


Atwood, George Baker 


Ferguson, Mo. 


layior 


Avery, Frederic Mercer 


Peoria, III. 


L/lark i> 


Babson, George Jay, Jr. 


Leesburg, Va. 


Andover 6 


Bailey, Morton Stevens 


Hillsboro, N. H. 


Day 28 


Baker, William Henry 


Lynn 


Miss Carter's 


Bateman, Glen Latrobe 


Johannesburg, S. Africa Taylor 9 


Bauer, Paul Sherman 


Lynn 


Clement 2 


Bock, Adolph Bismark Card 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 27 


Brainard, Ira Fitch, 2d 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Bartlet 9 


Bunting, Albert Munger 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Mrs. Castle's 



* Deceased. 



80 



NAMES 


Kill B11J ill JN CJUB 


£l\J\JDflt3 


Carr, Donald Eaton 


Mamaroneck, N. Y. 


Taylor 5 


Carter, Kicnard rhillip 


Andover 


West Andover 


Chadwick, Harrison 


Winchester 


Bishop 12 


Chapman, Horatio Campbell, Jr. 


Saybrook, Conn. 


Joancroit u 


Chapman, Kobert Miller 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


A I ...... , i a 

Adams 19 


Cheney, Stanley 


Cambridge 


TT _ t a 

xiaray z 


Clark, Herbert Sherman, Jr. 


tiolyoke 


T > • 1 „ O i 

Bishop 34 


Clarke, Samuel Montague 


Southbridge 


Adams 4 


/"l 1_ T _ 1- /"~< 11 

Cook, Joseph Gould 


West Newton 


Day 11 


Cornell, Joseph I 


/;>„„. Q'J~ T T AT V 

Bay owe, L. 1 ., IS . i . 


A UU Q 

Abbot o 


/~l T T_ A 1 

Cory, John Aumock 


Newark, N. J. 


Adams 13 


Cummings, Leland Wilson 


Crafton, Pa. 


Bishop 28 


Cutler, benjamin Crawford 


Andover 


9 Abbot street 


Cutler, Howard McHeen 


Andover 


9 Abbot fetreet 


JJanlorth, Ceorge Henry, 3d 


oummit, JS . J . 


Andover 9 


T*V x T^ J J A i n 1 

Davenport, Edward Augustus, 2d 


Somerville 


Pease 10 


Dederer, Eugene Morgan 


XT T7 7 AT 1/ 

New York, N. Y . 


Clark lo 


Doran, J^dward 


North Andover 


North Andover 


L> Wolf, Henry Dreyer 


Bristol, ti. 1. 


Bartlet zo 


TA- T» 11 

Dyer, George Bell 


AT T7 7 AT 1/ 

New York, N. Y. 


Eaton 5 


Emery, Willard, Jr. 


Topsfield 


Abbot 11 


rabian, lracy 


New Haven, Conn. 


Bancroft 7 


lairback, Jidliot 


St. Louis, Mo. 


TT-ll - _ TT„11 

Williams Hall 


Ferguson, Oliver Drayton 


Paducah, Ky. 


Bishop 8 


JPritchman, Harold Dale 


Indiana, Pa. 


Bishop 16 


Goodwill, Francis Ormes 


Jamestown, N. Y. 


Abbot 15 


Griffin, Allen Abram 


Atmore, Ala. 


Taylor 23 


Gulliver, Arthur Conant 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Taylor 3 


T T 1 1 ^ « . . . , TTJC1K««« T7 * T«- 

Halloran, William .rrancis, Jr. 


Methuen 


Methuen 


Hays, David Douglas 


Johnstown, N. Y. 


Clark 5 


TT_1 \T'!1 1 ! Tl' 1 _ 

Holmes, William Hicks 


Wyoming, N.J. 


Mr. Chandler's 


TT,,„4 A 1£_„ J XT I, l T_ 

Hunt, Alfred Herbert, Jr. 


Colorado Springs, Colo. Bartlet 8 


Hurtado, Manuel 


Mexico City, Mexico 


Tucker 1 


Jackson, Donald Harrington 


Bath, Me. 


Mrs. Peet's 


T _ _ T> If J 

Jones, Bradford 


Brookline 


Farrar 6 


T /~<1 1 C_1J 

Jopp, Charles belden 


Brookline 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Kaufman, Jerome Alvin 


New York, N. Y. 


Mr. Stott's 


wCincf rroTi^io 1 t^ipq 1 rl 
JVlUg, X I dlll/lS VJcrdlU. 


Lawrence 


Adams 9 


Lee, Wilmot Brereton 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 24 


Leisenring, Walter 


Upper Lehigh, Pa. 


Bishop 32 



81 



Look, Allen MacMartin 

Lord, Phillips Haynes 

McDonald, Claude Comstock 

MacDonald, Harry Alexander 

McGrew, Edward Josephus, Jr. 

Mclnnes, Robert Rodger 

Mclntire, Morris Shear 

MacNeil, Alden Brooks 

Masuda, Katsunobu 

Mathews, Frank Pelletreau 

Maxson, Albert Freeman 

Mayo, Edward Leonard 

Merrick, Lathrop Bennett 

Mills, Grant Brickett 

Morrill, John Anderson 

Mulcahy, James Edmond 

Mulcahy, Paul Emerson 

Munger, John Dudley 

Newman, William Mendel 

Norby, Fred Clarence 

Orchard, Richard Shuart 

Park, Elliott Norwood 

Peirce, Charles Leonard, 3d 

Quarrier, Archie Monroe 

Reed, Joseph Verner 

Reid, Thomas Francis 

Rentschler, Walter Anthony 

Robertson, Robert Stoddart, Jr. 

Rose, Sayre Broadhead 

Salinger, Robert Dennison 

Schroeder, Henry, Jr. 

Schumaker, Albert Gailey 

Screven, Franklin Buchanan 

Sellman, Frank Harwood 

Sheppard, Arthur Ronald Barton Oram 

Shipman, Thomas Leffingwell 

Soutar, James Henry 

Spencer, Donald 

Thomas, Albert Cox, Jr. 

Thomas, Charles Norton 



RESIDENCES ROOMS 

West Tisbury Clement 10 

Meriden, Conn. Abbot 18 

St. Joseph, Mo. Adams 10 

Andover Williams Hall 

Lexington, Mo. Bishop 13 

Bath, Me. Bishop 33 

Kansas City, Mo. Phillips 11 

College Point, N. Y. Bishop 27 

Tokyo, Japan Farrar 3 

New York, N. Y. Eaton 3 

Schenectady, N. Y. Bancroft 7 

DeKalb, III. Day 31 

Andover West Andover 

Reading Phillips 21 

Winchester Bishop 4 

San Francisco, Col. Draper 1 

San Francisco, Cat. Draper 1 

Waterbury, Conn. Bancroft 9 

Peirce City, Mo. Bishop 5 

Portland, Ore. Bishop 3 

Pelham Manor, N. Y. Phillips 12 
Cranford, N. J. Day 14 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Andover 1 

Short Hills, N. J. Bartlet 27 

Denver, Colo. Draper 5 

North Andover North Andover 

Hamilton, Ohio Mrs. Wainwright's 
Paducah, Ky. Bishop 6 

Glastonbury, Conn. Taylor 23 

Newtonville Bishop 14 

Kew Gardens, L. L, N. Y. Clark 16 
Waterbury, Conn. Bancroft 9 

Savannah, Ga. Draper 3 

Wellesley Hills Bartlet 24 

Hong Kong, China Miss MacKeown's 
Andover Williams Hall 

Andover 34 Union Street 

Andover 96 Central Street 

Foxboro Day 2 

Flushing, N. Y. Mrs. Wainwright's 



82 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


load, .Frederick rorter 


eic I OTK, x> . 1 . 


Eaton 5 


lurner. Jonn bennett 


.v orincn, n . l . 


bisnop 17 


Tweedy, Laurance, Jr. 


K^outn urange. .\ . J . 


Taylor 5 


v> aiker. basil 


uoeriin. unio 


L lement 1 1 


W alworth, W illiam IVIcAlpine 


Lawrence 


.Laton o 


Washburn, Thomas Savier 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


1 a\ lor 1 


W eed, Eben Graves 


Ma rblehead 


Jrnmips zu 


Vi einberg, Charles Morris 


Greenville, Miss. 


Abbot Id 


» ens, jonn nimtington 


r ayeueniie, . / . 


rarrar 4 


White, James Mattocks 


eicton L entre 


Adams 4 


"V\ llmot, N^elson Frank 


Rochester , A . } . 


jjisnop oo 


V\ r\\ fa F iiunn 


# nQhnrtnn (thin 


PViillirf? 1 7 


Wright, Charles Blossom 


Los Angeles, Cat 


Bishop 25 


Zimmer, Emile John, Jr. 


Montclair, X. J. 


Taylor 2 



Lower Middlers — 109 



83 



CLASSIFICATION 



Classical Department — 

Class I — Seniors 87 
Class II — Upper Middlers 59 
Class III — Lower Middlers 56 

202 

Class IV — Juniors 104 

Scientific Department 

Class A — Seniors 62 
Class B — Upper Middlers 97 
Class C — Lower Middlers 109 

—268 



574 



REPRESENTATION 



Massachusetts 


186 


Georgia 


2 


New York 


108 


Rhode Island 


2 


Connecticut 


43 


Washington 


2 


New Jersey 


39 


Alabama 


1 


Pennsylvania 


32 


South Dakota 


1 


Missouri 


25 


Louisiana 


1 


Illinois 


17 


Mississippi 


1 


New Hampshire 


14 


Oklahoma 


1 


Maine 


13 


Oregon 


1 


Ohio 


11 


China 


3 


Minnesota 


9 


Japan 


2 


California 


7 


Philippine Islands 


2 


Indiana 


7 


South Africa 


1 


Colorado 


6 


Canada 


1 


Michigan 


6 


Costa Rica 


1 


Kentucky 


5 


Denmark 


1 


Wisconsin 


5 


Guatemala 


1 


Tennessee 


4 


Mexico 


1 


Vermont 


4 






Virginia 


3 






Texas 


3 






District of Columbia 


2 


Total 


574 



84 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT 

Dwight H. Day, 1895 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

William S. Halsted, 1869 
Fred F. Katzenbach, 1874 
Daniel S. Knowlton, 1879 
Harlan W. Cooley, 1884 
Clarence Morgan, 1889 
Hiram Bingham, 1894 
Charles N. Kimball, 1899 

STATISTICAL SECRETARY 

George T. Eaton, 1873 

SECRETARY 

Frederick E. Newton, 1893 

TREASURER 

George F. French, 1897 Andover 



Meetings, with a reception and dinner, are held at Andover each year in 
connection with the graduation exercises. The date for 1920 will be June 18. 
It is desired that correspondence regarding membership and information 
concerning past members of the Academy be sent to the Statistical Secretary. 



BOSTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Alfred L. Ripley, 1873 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Marcus Morton, 1879 
Arthur B. Chapin, 1887 
Arthur D. Coffin, 1889 
Charles H. Wilson. 1893 

SECRETARY 

William B. Higgins, 1913; Andover, Mass. 

TREASURER 

W. B. Binnian, 1904, 111 Devonshire St., Boston 
85 



New York, N. Y. 

Baltimore, Md. 
Trenton, N. J. 
Boston 
Chicago, 111. 
Shelburne, Vt. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Sistersville, W. Va. 

Andover 

Andover 



William B. Stevens, 1861 
Desmond FitzGerald, 1863 
Edward C. Smith, 1871 
Hollis R. Bailey, 1873 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 
Fred B. Lund. 1884 
Joseph W. Lund, 1886 
Elias B. Bishop, 1889 
Henry W. Beal, 1893 
Raymond M. Crosby, 1893 
Brewer Eddy, 1894 
Frederick B. Greenhalge, 1894 

Robert T. Fisher, 1906 



Stephen E. Young, 1894 
W. F. Merrill, 1895 
Arthur Diinkwater, 1896 
Philip W. Thomson, 1898 
Joseph S. Seabury, 1900 
Howard M. Bartlett, 1902 
F. Abbot Goodhue, 1902 
Philip L. Reed, 1902 



CHICAGO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Robert A. Gardner, 1908 James W. Marshall, 1904 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Edward J. Winters, 1914; The Rookery 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

S. Lewis Smith, 1885 Charles A. Otis, 1888 



DETROIT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

William T. Barbour, 1896 Lawrence K. Butler, 1897 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Kenneth L. Moore, 1910; 169 Van Dyke Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Burns Henry, 1896 C. Hayward Murphy, 1902 

Steuart L. Pittman, 1908 Kenneth L. Moore, 1910 



NEW JERSEY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT SECRETARY 

Forrest F. Dryden, 1889 Albert Frey, 1881; 331 South Orange Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Decker, 1910 Allan M. Hirsh, 1898 

Kinsley Twining, 1897 

86 



NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Francis R. Appleton, 1871 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

racy H. Harris, 1882 Oliver G. Jennings, 1883 

SECRETARY 

Frank H. Simmons, 1894; 110 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. 

TREASURER 

Frank Dale Warren, 1879; 225 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Henry J. Fisher, 1892 James L. Mills, 1897 

G. Ernest Merriam, 1892 Fred S. Bale, 1902 

F. Maurice Newton, 1895 Douglas H. Cooke, 1903 

Herbert H. Ramsay, 1905 



NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred E. Weyerhaeuser, 1892 John Crosby, 1886 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Edwin White, 1902; 93 East 4th Street, St. Paul, Minn. 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Walter L. Murphy, 1868 William S. Wadsworth, 1887 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Horace O. Wells, 1892; Pine Street, west of Broad, Peirce School 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

George L. Herrick, 1869 Laurence T. Bliss, 1891 

Seneca Egbert, 1880 Harry B. Hickman, 1894 

Herman V. Ames, 1884 William H. McCarthy, 1907 

Joseph W. Lucas, 1885 Henry N. Merritt, 1908 

Sydney Thayer, Jr., 1915 



87 



PITTSBURGH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Southard Hay, 1898 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

M. B. Suydam, 1896 

SECRETARY 

James J. Brainerd, 1899; 1363 Shady Ave. 

TREASURER 

Chauncey O'Neill, 1900 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. W. Burdick, 1898, Chairman 
G. B. Preston, 1877 
E. H. Brainard, 1888 
C. E. Beeson, 1890 

T. M. Jones, 3d, 1917 



Clinton L. Childs, 1898 
Turner D. Moorehead, 1906 
F. T. Hogg, 1913 
J. B. Blair, 1916 



ST. LOUIS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Sidney R. Overall, 1903; Federal Reserve Bank Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

James E. Allison, 1885 A. Linn Bostwick, 1904 

Walter C. Taylor, 1885 Samuel N. Holliday, 1904 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Brig.-Gen. Marlborough Churchill, 1896 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Charles Sheldon, 1887 W. D. Wilcox, 1889 

Ord Preston, 1894 

TREASURER 

Duer McLanahan, 1917 
88 



SECRETARY 

Robert C. Dove, 1907; Shorehara Hotel 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Hon. Richard Wayne Parker, 1864 John A. Mcllhenny, 188^ 

Irving H. Dunlap, 1881 Robert S. Hume, 1894 

Henry S. Graves, 1888 Murray A. Cobb, 1899 

A. Britton Browne, 1906 



OMAHA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Charles E. Metz, 1911 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Ralph Peters, 1911 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

John H. Caldwell, 1908; U. S. Trust Co. 



89 



INDEX 



Subject Page 

Absences 23 

Academy 

Constitution 10-15 

History 10-15 

Location 15 

Administration Offices 32 

Admission 17 

Admission Requirements 17-19 

Algebra 49 

Alumni Association 85 

Athletic fees 25 

Athletic grounds 33 

Bible 48 

Board 27 

Dining Hall 

Private Houses 

Boston Alumni Association 85 

Breakage Deposit 24 

Chapel 32 

Chemistry 51 

Chicago Alumni Association 86 

Classification 84 

Class Officers 22 

Cleveland Alumni Association 86 

Course of Study 40-42 

Cum Laude 65 

Curriculum 40-42 

Detroit Alumni Association 86 

Dining Hall 27 

Diploma Requirements 21 

Dormitories . 29-31 

Faculty Houses 29 

Rents 25-27 



90 



Subject Page 

Scholarship Rooms .... 34 

Williams Hall (for young boys) .... 28 

Drawing 51 

English 47 

English Bible 48 

Entrance Examinations 21 

Entrance Examination Requirements 17-18 

Excuses, Out-of -Town 23 

Expenses 24-26 

Faculty 6-7 

Fees, Athletics and Infirmary 25 

Founders of Phillips Academy 4 

French 44 

Furniture in Rooms 26 

General Science 51 

Geometry 50 

Graduation Fee 24 

Greek 43 

Gymnasium 32 

History of Phillips Academy 10-15 

Honor Students (1918-1919) 63 

Infirmary 32 

Infirmary Rates 25 

Latin 43 

List of Students 1918-19 68-83 

Mechanical Drawing 51 

Music 53 

New Jersey Alumni Association 86 

New York Alumni Association 87 

Northwestern Alumni Association 87 



91 



Subject Page 

Peabody House SI 

Philadelphia Alumni Association ... 87 

Phillips Academy 10-15 

Its Origin 

Constitution 

Phillips Inn 32 

Philosophy , 53 

Physical Training 52 

Physics 51 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association 88 

Preachers 9 

Principals 4 

Prizes 55-59 

Prizes Awarded 1919 60-62 

Public Speaking 48 

Recitation Buildings 31 

Religious Exercises 23 

Representation 84 

Scholarship Aid 3 4 

Self-Help 

Special Room-Scholarships 

Scholarship Funds 34-39 

Scholarship Honors 63 

Scholarship Rooms 34 

Science, General 51 

Senior Honors 64 

Spanish 46 

St. Louis Alumni Association 88 

Students, List 1918-19 68-83 

Swimming Pool . 32 

Testimonials 17 

Trigonometry 50 

Trustees 5 

Washington Alumni Association 88 

Williams Hall 

Dormitory for Young Boys 28 



92 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-THIRD YEAR 



April, 1921 




Andover, Massachusetts 
THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1921 



1921 1921 1922 1922 



JANUARY 



SMT WT F S 



JULY 




JANUARY 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 












1 

8 


2 




1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


11 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


24 


25 


26 




28 


29 


30 




29 


30 


31 










31 






















AUGUST 






FEBRUARY 




1i 1 


3 


4 


5 


6 










1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


7 


8 


!) 


10 


11 


12 


13 




5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


21 






24 


25 


26 


27 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 




28 


s 


30 


« 










26 


27 


28 




























SEPTEMBER 




MARCH 










1 


2 












1 


2 


3 


4 


4 


■i 


M 


•i 


9 


ll 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


11 


12 13 14115 16 


17 




12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


18 


19 20 




22 


23 


24 




19 


20 


21 




23 


24 


25 




26 




28 


29 30 






26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




OCTOBER 




APRIL 


























1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




8 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 





10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


1819 


20 


21 


22 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 


28 


29 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 


31 






.. 








80 














NOVEMBER 




MAY 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 






1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


6 


■i 




9 


1011 


12 






8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17|18 






14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19'20 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 26 26 




21122 


23 


24 


25 


26 




27 


28 29 


30 










28 


29 


30 


31 












1 1 












DECEMBER 






JUNE 










i 


2 


3 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




9 10 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


1314:i5 


16 17 




11 


12 


18 14 


15 


1617 


18 


19 


20 21 


22 


23 24 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23; 24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30131 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 





M T W T F 8 



7 

14 
20 21 
27 



FEBRUARY 



II 2 
8 9 
15116 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


'22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 



















6 

13 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 



22 23 
29 30 



AUGUST 







1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


.31 







SEPTEMBER 











1 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 


28 


29 


30 



NOVEMBE R 



21 8 
9 10 11 
16 17 
22 23,24 25 



DECEMBER 



3 4 
10 11 
17 18 
24 25 

811.. 



II 2 
8 9 
15 16 

22|23 



CALENDAR 



1921 



January 
March 2> 
April J f 
June 16 

June 17 
June 



to 25 



Wednesday, 8. ko p.m. 
Thursday noon 
Monday, 845 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



June 21 arid 22 Tuesday and Wednesday 



June 25 



Saturday 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for two lower 

classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board ex- 
aminations 

Entrance examinations in An- 
dover, New York City, Chi- 
cago, and other cities 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



September 13 

September H 

September 15 

Sovember 2 If 
December 16 



Tuesday, 9.00 a.m . 

Wednesday, 745 a.m. 

Thursday, 7 45 a.m. 

Thursday 
Friday noon 



Chapel, followed by entrance 

examinations 
Exercises begin for the two 

lower classes 
Exercises begin for the two 

upper classes 
Thanksgiving recess 
First term ends 



January If. 
March 23 
April 3 
June 15 

June 16 
June 19 to 



1922 

Wednesday, 845 p.m. 
Thursday noon 
Monday, 845 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



June 20 and 21 Tuesday and Wednesday 



June 2If 



Saturday 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for the two 

lower classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board Ex- 
aminations 

School entrance examinations in 
Andover, New York City, and 
Chicago 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



3 



FOUNDERS 



Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS Hon. JOHN PHILLIPS, LL.D. 

Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS, Jr. 



Constitution and Deeds of Trust signed 
Board of Trustees organized 
School opened for instruction 
Act of Incorporation passed 
Theological Seminary opened 
Scientific Department opened 
Archaeological Department opened 
Theological Seminary incorporated 
Theological Seminary real estate purchased 



April 21, 1778 
April 28, 1778 
April 30, 1778 
October 4, 1780 
September 28, 1808 
September 27, 1830 
May 1, 1901 
April 16, 1907 
July 1, 1908 



PRINCIPALS 



ELIPHALET PEARSON, LL.D. 1778 — 1786 

EBENEZER PEMBERTON, LL.D. 1786 — 1793 

MARK NEWMAN, A.M. 1795 — 1810 

JOHN ADAMS, LL.D. 1810 — 1833 

OSGOOD JOHNSON, A.M. 1833 — 1837 

SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, LL.D. 1838 — 1871 

FREDERIC W. TILTON, A.M. 1871 — 1873 

CECIL F. P. BANCROFT, Ph.D., LL.D. 1873 — 1901 

ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 1903 — 



4 



TRUSTEES 



ALFRED LAWRENCE RIPLEY, A.M. 
Elected 1902 

CLERK 

ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, Litt. D., L.H.D 
Elected 1903 

TREASURER 

JAMES COWAN SAWYER, A.B. 
Elected 1900 



JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D. 
Elected 1899 

CLARENCE MORGAN, A.B. 
Elected 1900 

CLIFFORD HERSCHELL MOORE, Litt D. 
Elected 1902 

HENRY LEWIS STIMSON, A.M. 
Elected 1905 

ELIAS BULLARD BISHOP, A.B. 
Elected 1907 

JOHN ADAMS AIKEN, LL.D. 
Elected 1908 

FRED TOWSLEY MURPHY, M.D. 
Elected 1908 

JOSEPH PARSONS 
Elected 1910 

FREDERICK GOODRICH CRANE 
Elected 1912 

GEORGE BOWEN CASE, A.B. 
Elected 1920 



AXDOVER 
AXDOVER 

AXDOVER 

Cambridge 
Sheleurxe. Yt. 
Cambridge 
New York Cut 
Newtox Cextre 
Greexfield 
Detroit, Mich. 
Lakevelle, Coxx. 

D ALT OX 

ExGLEWOOD, N. J. 



5 



FACULTY 



ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, A.M., Litt.D., L.H.D., Principal 

On the Peter Smith Byers Memorial Foundation 6 Chapel Avenue 

Instructor 1897-1903. Elected Principal 1903 

*MATTHEW SCOBY McCURDY, A.M. 60 Bartlet Street 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1873 

GEORGE THOMAS EATON, A.M. 73 Bartlet Street 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1880 

CHARLES EMERSON STONE, Ph.B. 158 Main Street 

Instructor in French Appointed 1890 

CHARLES HENRY FORBES, A.M. 25 Hidden Road 

Professor of Latin on the John C. Phillips Foundation Elected 1891 

ARCHIBALD FREEMAN, A.M. Phillips 16 

Instructor in History Appointed 1892 

ALLEN ROGERS BENNER, A.B. Andover 7 

Professor of Greek Elected 1892 

JAMES CHANDLER GRAHAM, S.B. Phillips 5 

Peabody Instructor in Natural Sciences Appointed 1892 

JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS, A.B. Williams Hall 

Instructor in Latin Appointed 1894 



FREDERICK EDWIN NEWTON, Ph.B 

Instructor in Mathematics 

CHARLES PEABODY, Ph.D. 

Director of the Department of American 
Archaeology 

WARREN KING MOOREHEAD, A.M. 

Field Director of Archaeological Exploration in New 
England and Curator of the Museum 
LESTER EDWARD LYNDE, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Principal's Assistant 
HORACE MARTIN POYNTER, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
PEIRSON STERLING PAGE, M.D. 

Physical Director and Medical Adviser 
GEORGE WALKER HINMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in Latin 
CECIL KITTREDGE BANCROFT, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin, Principal's Assistant, 
and Registrar 
CHARLES ARTHUR PARMELEE, A.M. 

Instructor in French 
* Deceased February 16, 1921 



9 Salem Street 
Appointed 1895 
197 Brattle Street, Cambridge 
Elected 1901 



Hidden Field 
Elected 1901 



195 Main Street 
Appointed 1901 
21 Phillips Street 
Appointed 1902 
193 Main Street 
Appointed 1902 
169 Main Street 
Appointed 1906 
Bartlet 5 
Appointed 1906 

Bartlet 22 
Appointed 1906 



ARTHUR WTTTTS TFONFARD AR 

AlVinUIV T» XXjXjXCj XjXldVJ CXXYXJ , tx.XJ. 


7Q Rnrtlpt Shrppt 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1907 


MARTCTfAM WTNSLOW STACKPOLE STR 

i'X £\ I V XV X X . \ YX m 111 OIjW ii O X Jl V^lVl V J till, O . X . XX . 


189 Main Strppt 

XOi7 XVXctlXX uUCCl 


School M inister and Instructor in Bible 


Appointed 1907 


CrFORCrF FR A "MKT TN FRENCH AM 

VJ Xli liVJ I j 1 lVrY^N XVX^1^\ X" XvXl/lA V_/XX, rV.HX. 


XX, xJClXUUl O L1CC I 


Instructor in German and French 


Appointed 1907 




183 Main Strppt 

lOO XTXctiXX tJllCCl 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1908 


FRF/nFRTCTC MAY R(YVTF A M 


Tavlnr Hnll 

X ct,V 1U1 XXctXl 


Instructor in Physics 


Appointed 1909 


GTTY HER ARE) FATON A R 

VJ U X XXXL/XJXVXVX/ XU£\X\JlV f XX. U. 


±JiXL±\^L %Jl L O 


Instructor in M athematics 


Appointed 1909 


OSWALD TOWER A R 

KJtJ IT £XXJU JLV^YVXliXV, XX . XX . 


02« X XXXXXXiJo CLRCL 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1910 


FRANK" O'RRTFN A R 

1 XV All Ji. KJ X»XVXXX/1>I ) XX. XX. 


Arlamct TTnll 
xi-LlctiJ-lO XJLctl* 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1910 


PART FRTFFiRTPH PFATTFTCHFR A M 
v^iVxvJ-i -T lillLiUlvlvvil rr A L 1 xxil v^xxxjXv, A.lVl. 




Instructor in Music and Philosophy 


Appointed 1912 


FRFPiFRTP WTTTTAM HFATON STOTT A R 

V XVxVXy XliXxX VVxXjJjIAIVx r±CjJ\ x VJiN DlUl I, xv . I J . 


t 1 X»tllLlLL UUCCl 


Instructor in English and Public Speaking 


Appointed 1912 


1V1JW11M lXiiMNxliX XX x ill/ \V o 1 ill IX, A.lVx. 


8 Judson Road 


In Qfriifinr in flpnnrn / nh / )i nnrl A <?<?? Qtnnf in Phillip? 

X 1 I/O VI WO L1J 1 lit XJIZUy 1 [AL/lltJ UILLL ilOO [tJMt'tt lit X IIUOVIjO 


AnDointed 1916 


TinWAPn W A l^QWfiPT'T-T PTTTTT? PIT p n Fi 
xllJVVAxViy VV AUo VV KJJx 1 xl v_/XX U xvv^xx, Lll.lJ. 


xjisnop lu 


Instructor in German 


Appointed 1917 


ROV FVFRFTT CIPPNCFR A R 


Pemberton 4 


Instructor in English 


Annnintpd 1Q17 


T FSTFR CHART PQ MTTWTnN A M 


o-* oaiem oireet 


Instructor in French and German 


Appointed 1918 


T AWRFNCF V ROTH A M 
Xj/V VVxiXiiN y^£j V xiUxxl, A.1V1. 


layior xiaii 


Instructor in History 


Appointed 1918 


FRANK" MAY RFNTON A R 


Anomc TTq|1 

Auams xxan 


Instructor in Latin 


Appointed 1918 


HARHTTi PR AWTJARH A P 


Disnop ou 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1918 


HFNRY PRFSTON If FT T PV A R 
xxJliXNxvx xxvilOxLfiM xVXI/X^x^xli x , A. 13. 


jjay ou 


XILoliiHyiUr tit kj ULLiLtoiL LLrlUi x roflLii 


/\ppointeQ iyio 




Day 7 


Instructor in Drawing and M athematics and 


Appointea lyiy 


Assistant in Physics 




HERBERT FREEMAN FRASER, A.M. 


45 Salem Street 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1919 



7 



CLIFFORD KIRKPATRICK, A.B. Williams Hall 

Instructor in Mathematics and Assistant in Chemistry Appointed 1920 



OTHER OFFICERS 



FREDERICK JOSEPH DALY, A.B. 147 Main Street 

Private Secretary to the Principal 
SARAH LOW FROST 210 Main Street 

Librarian 

VIRGIL D. HARRINGTON, A.B. 18 Chapel Avenue 

Purchasing Agent and Manager of the Service Department 

HENRY S. HOPPER 25 Phillips Street 

Bursar 

JOHN H. BUTTIMER, S.B. 238 Main Street 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 
HARRIET L. ERVING 45 Salem Street 

Bookkeeper 

MABEL L. JONES 33 Chestnut Street 

Secretary to the Principal 
ALICE T. WHITNEY 61 Bartlet Street 

Recorder 

MONTVILLE E. PECK Bancroft 1 

Assistant to the Physical Director 
ETHEL A. HITCHCOCK High Street 

Assistant in the Superintendent's Office 
ETHEL M. EATON 67 Bartlet Street 

Acting Secretary to the Principal 
MRS. G. R. CANNON 54 Salem Street 

Assistant to the Alumni Secretary 
ANN S. LESLIE 24 Brechin Terrace 

Assistant in the Treasurer's Office 
MELVINA M. McKEEVER Isham Infirmary 

Matron at Isham Infirmary 
MRS. C. M. BAILEY Williams Hall 

Matron at Williams Hall 
EUNICE C. LOVEJOY 21 Lovejoy Road 

Assistant in the Treasurer's Office 
E. ROSAMOND GREENWOOD, A.B. Lawrence 

Assistant Secretary to the Principal 
ALEXANDER SUTHERLAND 

Instructor in Boxing and Swimming 
RAY ARTHUR SHEPARD, S.B. Draper 4 

Assistant to the Physical Director Appointed 1919 



8 



ACADEMY PREACHERS, 1920-1921 



Rev. MARKHAM W. STACKPOLE, School Minister 
Principal ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 



T> /~^T 4 TT T7> X T /"I 4 TT 4 TT TT t~\~X """TT TT T\ 

President CLARENCE A. BARBOUR, D.D. 


Rochester, JN. x. 


TT TITvttt 4 TTT~\ /~i T) A"\ r \TrrrV\T 

Rev. EDWARD C. BOYNTON 


Worcester 


TT \TT>TTT>A fT 4 TT T> r\X^\ T Hnr\\T rv TV 

Rev. NEHEMIAH BOiNTON, D.D. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


TV nTT 4 TT T T^C TT TT T"\ ATT'X' TV T\ 

Dean CHARLES R. BROWN, D.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


EDWARD C. CARTER 


New York, N. Y. 


TT T T 4 TT'TT 4 \T "TV 4 TTX"*'T^T.7' 

Rev. vALGHAN DABNEY 


Dorchester 


TT TT 4 "n"nX7 TT T , v"pTT T "nX7 T~T Fv 

Rev. HARRY P. DEWEY, D.D. 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


TT T\ TT TT 17* TT TT T7< T \ T~\ "\ 7 

Rev. D. BREWER EDDY 


Boston 


TT TT TT/""\"\7TT "nrvTT T 4 "nrvfi r\ x~v 

Rev. F. BOYD EDWARDS, D.D. 


Orange, N. J. 


TT TATT\T TT ■nTrp/^TTT^XT T 

Rev. JOHN F. FITCHEN, Jr. 


Albany, N. Y. 


TT ■nr\Tr»T\T tt ttt'/i TTnn T"v rv 

Bishop EDWIN H. HLGHES, D.D. 


Maiden 


■nT\TTT i TT f-v TT TTTT1 j"n X f" "Tv 

EDWARD H. HUME, M.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


4 T T>X7* 4 XTTXT^TT T T 4 /"^T^"0 /~\X**" 

ALEXANDER L. JACKSON 


New York, N. Y. 


Rev. RAYMOND C. KNOX, S.T.D. 


New York, N. Y. 


Rt. Rev. WILLIAM LAWRENCE, D.D., LL.D. 


Boston 


Rev. ASHLEY D. LEAVITT, D.D. 


Brookline 


ROSALIE S. MORTON, M.D. 


New York, N. Y. 


Rev. JASON NOBLE PIERCE 


Washington, D. C. 


Rev. JOHN HERMAN RANDALL, D.D. 


New York, N. Y. 


ROBERT E. SPEER, D.D. 


New York, N. Y. 


Rev. EDW ARD T. SULLIVAN 


Newton 


President JOHN M. THOMAS, D.D. 


Middlebury, Vt. 


CURTIS WHEELER 


New York, N. Y. 


Rev. ARTHUR S. WTIEELOCK 


Andover 



9 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is not a private school, but an endowed 
academy, controlled by a Board of Trustees and administered 
under the written constitution of its founders. By the terms 
of this Constitution, or Deed of Gift, signed April 21, 1778, 
Esquire Samuel Phillips (1715-1790) of North Andover and his 
brother, John Phillips (1719-1795) of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
set aside tracts of about 141 acres on Andover Hill and 200 acres 
in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, together with the sum of 1614 
pounds, as a foundation for a school. This document, outlining 
the broad principles upon which the proposed institution was to 
be conducted, was composed by Esquire Phillips's son, Samuel 
Phillips, Jr. (1752-1802), with the advice and aid of his friend, 
Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826). Samuel Phillips, Jr. was after- 
wards Judge of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, 
President of the Senate, and Lieutenant-Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Although Judge Phillips derived many of his educational 
theories from the writings of John Locke and from the English 
nonconformist schools with the scheme of which he was familiar, 
his plan was nevertheless highly original. The purpose of the 
academy was specifically stated in the following words : — 

"And, in order to prevent the smallest subversion of the true intent of this 
Foundation, it is again declared, that the first and principal object of this 
Institution is the promotion of true Piety and Virtue; the second, instruction 
in English, Latin, and Greek languages, together with Writing, Arithmetic, 
Music, and the Art of Speaking; the third, practical Geometry, Logic, and 
Geography; and the fourth, such other of the liberal Arts and Sciences, or 
Languages, as opportunity and ability may hereafter admit, and as the Trustees 
shall direct. " 



10 



The chief emphasis was laid on the development of character, 
and the Master was to take pains "to regulate the tempers, to 
enlarge the minds, and form the Morals of the Youth com- 
mitted to his care". It was stipulated, also, that the school 
"shall be ever equally open to youth, of requisite qualifications, 
from every quarter ". The government was placed in the hands 
of a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. In order to prevent 
sectarianism and provincialism, it was specified that a majority 
of the members should be laymen, and that more than half 
must not be residents of the town in which the academy is 
located. The Trustees were hampered by no vexatious or 
trivial restrictions, but were given sole authority over the institu- 
tion. By the provisions of the Act of Incorporation, passed by 
the General Court, October 4, 1780, their number was fixed at 
never more than thirteen or less than seven, and they were 
permitted to possess real estate with an income not exceeding 
five hundred pounds and personal property with an income not 
greater than two thousand pounds. These holding powers have 
since been considerably enlarged by legislative enactments, as 
the school has grown. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Tuesday, April 28, 1778. Of the twelve original members, four 
were members of the Phillips family: Esquire Samuel Phillips, 
John Phillips, William Phillips of Boston, and Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. These men became in turn the first four presidents of the 
Board. The other members, all relatives or close friends of the 
Phillips family, were John Lowell and Oliver Wendell of Boston, 
Rev. Josiah Stearns of Epping, Rev. Elias Smith of Middleton, 
Rev. William Symmes of North Andover, and Rev. Jonathan 
French, Nehemiah Abbot, Esq., and Eliphalet Pearson of 
Andover. 

Phillips School, as it was called until its incorporation, was 
opened for instruction April 30, 1778, in a remodeled carpenter's 
shop on Andover Hill, thirteen pupils being present; before the 
year was over, fifty-two had registered. The first principal was 

11 



Eliphalet Pearson, a stimulating teacher and stern discipli- 
narian, who established high standards of instruction and 
supervision. Shortly before he resigned in 1786 to become a 
professor at Harvard, a new wooden building was erected to 
meet the demands of the rapidly expanding school. Pearson 
was succeeded by Ebenezer Pemberton, a polite and scholarly 
master, who devoted much attention to the manners of his 
pupils. When he left in 1793, he was followed in office by Mark 
Newman, in whose administration the Andover Theological 
Seminary was founded, largely through the efforts of Dr. 
Pearson. This seminary, which was opened September 28, 
1808, was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees 
of Phillips Academy, and remained in Andover almost exactly 
a century. 

The fourth principal, John Adams, who replaced Newman in 
1810, raised the prestige of the school, increased the attendance, 
and enlarged the faculty. He published the first catalogue and 
made the first revision of the curriculum ; but his primary interest 
was in the moral welfare of the boys. The second Academy 
building was burned on January 28, 1818, and a new brick, 
colonial edifice, designed by the famous architect Bulfinch, was 
erected within a year; this "classic hall", described in Oliver 
Wendell Holmes *s poem, The School Boy, is now in use as the 
Dining Hall. In 1830 the Teachers' Seminary, a new institu- 
tion made possible by a bequest of His Honor, William Phillips 
(1750-1827) of Boston, was opened in a massive square structure, 
commonly known as the Stone Academy, built for that purpose. 
This Teachers ' Seminary, combining the aims of a normal 
school and a scientific school, was the second of its kind in the 
United States. After twelve years of existence with only 
moderate success it was finally, in 1842, merged with Phillips 
Academy as the "English Department", a name which was 
changed in 1892 to a more nearly accurate title, "Scientific 
Department ". 

12 



In 183*2 John Adams resigned at the age of sixty, and Osgood 
Johnson was elected principal. Unfortunately he died in 1837, 
of consumption, in his thirty-fifth year. During his adminis- 
tration the ''Commons", dormitories known to so many gene- 
rations of Phillips boys, were built under the direction of 
Samuel Farrar. Esq.. Treasurer of the Trustees. 

Samuel H. Taylor, whose reign of thirty-four years was the 
longest in the school history, became principal in 1837. The 
word "reign" is used advisedly, for he was an autocrat, severe 
in his methods of government and prompt to punish offenders. 
"Uncle Sam", as he was familiarly called, was a relentless 
drill-master in the classics and gained a well-deserved repu- 
tation for thoroughness and accuracy. He was a strong and 
vigorous personality, who made an enduring impression on all 
who came under his influence. In 1864 the Stone Academy 
was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by the present Main 
Building, which has since been twice reconstructed. In 1865 
Mr. George Peabody gave -825,000 to found the Peabody 
Instructorship in Natural Sciences, first filled by the late 
William B. Graves. Dr. Taylor, on January 29, 1871, dropped 
dead in the vestibule of the Main Building. For the next 
two years the office of principal was held by Frederic W. Tilton. 
who, however, could do little in that short period. 

The modern era of development began in 1873 with the 
arrival of Cecil F. P. Bancroft, who was principal until his 
death in 1901. Dr. Bancroft, working in a quiet, tactful, but 
persistent way, brought about many needed reforms. He 
first made a complete revision of the curriculum, thus enabling 
the school to meet the entrance requirements of any college, 
classical or scientific, and greatly broadening the range of 
studies. In his effort to gather about himself a larger and 
more efficient body of teachers he was entirely successful. The 
attendance also increased: in 1873 there were 252 pupils; in 
1895 this had grown to 524, and after 1892 it never again 
dropped below 400. Dr. Bancroft also strove to secure additions 

13 



to the plant, especially by providing dormitories in which boys 
could live under the direct supervision of instructors. He was 
aided in this aim by Melville C. Day of the class of 1858, who, 
in 1892, gave $8000 for a new dormitory, Taylor Cottage (now 
Pemberton Cottage), which was the beginning of the present 
extensive system of houses for students. Mr. Day continued 
his gifts, providing in all six dormitories which to-day furnish 
rooms for 168 boys, besides the teachers in charge. At his 
death in 1913 Mr. Day made Phillips Academy his residuary 
legatee. His gifts to the school amount in all to over $800,000. 

On June 5 and 6, 1878, Phillips Academy celebrated its 
centennial anniversary with elaborate exercises, including an 
historical paper by Rev. William E. Park, an oration by Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and 
speeches by Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Gustavus V. Fox, 
and other distinguished men associated with the school. At 
this time a fund of $100,000 was raised, partly for the en- 
dowment of a principalship and a professorship in Latin. 

Dr. Bancroft's period was marked by both progress and 
expansion. He was a man of clear vision and foresight, firm 
will, and shrewd discrimination, who had the good sense to be 
patient until circumstances were favorable for pressing his 
projects. His policy has been maintained by his successor, 
Alfred E. Stearns, during whose administration Phillips 
Academy has grown in material equipment, in numbers, and in 
efficiency. In 1908, when Andover Theological Seminary was 
moved to Cambridge, the Trustees acquired the entire Seminary 
plant on Andover Hill at a cost of $200,000, thus more than 
doubling its property in land and buildings. In 1901 two 
generous benefactors of the school, Mr. R. Singleton Peabody 
of the class of 1857, and his wife, Margaret Peabody, estab- 
lished the Archaeological Department and provided for it a large 
endowment for instruction, publication, and research, and for 
the care and housing of collections in American Archaeology. 

14 



The official installation of Principal Stearns into office happily 
coincided with the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the 
founding of the school, held on June 16, 1903. The guest of 
honor was His Excellency, Sir Chentung Liang Cheng, Minister 
Plenipotentiary from the Chinese Empire to the United States, 
who was a student at Phillips Academy in 1880 and 1881. At 
the exercises in the new Borden Gymnasium the speakers were 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie, Hon. Robert R. Bishop, Sir Chentung 
Liang Cheng, and Mr. Stearns. On the same day Brothers' 
Field was dedicated with an address from the principal donor, 
Mr. George B. Knapp. 

Concerning the significant developments of recent years, im- 
portant though they are, little need be said here. At his death 
in 1917 Colonel Oliver Hazard Payne, of the class of 1859, be- 
queathed to the academy the sum of $500,000, this being the 
largest single gift yet made to the Trustees. In 1919, at the 
instigation of an alumni committee, a nation-wide campaign for 
a Building and Endowment Fund of $1,500,000 was opened, and 
has resulted in the securing of about $1,600,000. The income of 
two-thirds of this amount will be devoted to the salaries of 
teachers and officers. 

In the World War, Phillips Academy played a distinguished 
part. Its Ambulance Unit, which sailed overseas in April 1917, 
was the first to be sent from any American school, and its bat- 
talion, formed in February, 1917, prepared many young men for 
the army. At least 2400 of its alumni were enrolled in the mili- 
tary or naval service of the United States or its Allies; and 
eighty-seven gave their lives in the cause of their country. A 
Memorial Bell Tower, soon to be erected on Andover Hill, will 
commemorate their loyalty and sacrifice. 

LOCATION 

Andover is a town of eight thousand inhabitants, situated 
on the Portland Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
twenty-three miles north of Boston. 

15 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY is national in its representation and 
democratic in its life and spirit, and is "equally open to youth 
of requisite qualifications from every quarter". It aims to at- 
tract students of serious educational purposes and high moral 
standards. 

The Academy is not a suitable school for boys who are idle, 
insubordinate, or lacking in self-control; nor is it adapted for 
those who require the constant supervision of teachers in the 
preparation of school work. Students who are found to be un- 
able or unwilling to meet the requirements, and those whose 
influence is injurious, must be withdrawn from the school. As 
maturity is not always to be measured by years, the school has 
no specific regulation as to the age of the candidate. In general, 
however, it has been found that boys of fourteen are able to meet 
the responsibilities of life in the Academy. 

The school provides accommodations and surroundings for its 
students which enable them to pass by gradual and natural 
stages from the paternalism of home life to the freedom that 
awaits them in college. Williams Hall, with its close supervision, 
special hours, and home life, offers attractive and helpful 
surroundings to the young boy just leaving home for his school 
career. A natural and progressive development is provided for 
subsequent years in the houses and halls which are in charge of 
married instructors. The regulations which obtain in all 
dormitories are here in force, but there is in them the atmos- 
phere of home. The later life of the dormitories is designed to 
develop a larger sense of responsibility and to prepare for the 
community life of college. Boys in the dormitories are under 
the supervision of instructors and are required to observe fully 
the regulations of the school. In the judgment of the school 
authorities the average boy will secure the best results intel- 
lectually and morally by following out this gradual change in 
residence. 



16 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



The requirements for admission to Phillips Academy consist in 
evidence of good character and of a satisfactory school record. 
The Academy being unable to receive all who apply for admis- 
sion, even when they can meet its minimum requirements, is 
obliged to discriminate among the applicants on the basis of 
their school records. It asks each candidate for admission to 
take certain specified examinations, in part to enable it to dis- 
criminate fairly among the applicants, but chiefly to enable it to 
properly classify those who are admitted. The school record 
already made by an applicant — interpreted to some extent 
by these examinations — determines largely the Academy's 
decision on each applicant. 

Students in the Academy arrange their work in accordance 
with the Course of Study as outlined on pages 41-43. This 
outline exhibits the work which is done each year by a 
student who is neither behind nor ahead of his class in any 
subject. It is not required that all the studies of a student shall 
be in the class in which he is rated; he is permitted to take in- 
dividual subjects below or above that class, if his preparation 
in the prerequisites of those subjects justifies such action. But a 
student ordinarily is not permitted to take courses in one class 
to the exclusion of uncompleted courses in a lower class except in 
subjects continuing through successive years. 

Applicants for admission to any of the three lower classes are 
asked to take entrance examinations set by the Academy on the 
work of such courses in its curriculum as they have completed. 
Each candidate should take the examinations for which his pre- 
vious work fits him, irrespective of the class groups in which the 
subjects are listed below. 



17 



Junior ^° en ^ er as a norma ^ Junior (first-year class) a 

£j candidate must have completed an approved 

grammar school course. He must pass satis- 
factorily examinations (1) in such essentials of formal English 
grammar as are treated in Kittredge and Farley's Concise 
English Grammar (Ginn & Co.), and (2) in the following topics 
of Arithmetic: common and decimal fractions, denominate 
numbers, percentage, interest, and square root. The examina- 
tion in English grammar will be combined with a test in spelling 
and composition. It is strongly recommended that candidates 
for the Junior Class become familiar with the declensions and 
conjugations of either Latin or French before entrance to the 
Academy. 

£ ower For those who wish to enter as normal Lower 

Middlers the Academy sets papers on the work 
Middle . . T . J ■* . | 

q 1(jlss done in its Junior year as outlined on pages 

41-42. These examinations cover: 

one year's work in Algebra, as described on page 50. 

one year's work in English, as described on page 48. 

one year's work in Latin (including Book II of Caesar's 

Gallic War), as described on page 44. 
one year's work in French (or German), as described on 

pages 45-46. 

TJ For those who wish to enter as normal Upper 

Middle Middlers the Academy sets papers on the work 

Ql a8s of its nrs ^ two years, as outlined on pages 

41-42. These examinations cover: 
*At least one year's work in Algebra (see note below) 

♦Candidates for the Upper Middle Scientific Class should have completed Elementary 
Algebra (Mathematics A, as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board), ana 
should secure credit for this subject at the college for which they are preparing. Those who 
cannot secure this credit should take the Academy's examination covering its first year's 
work in Algebra, described on page 50. Candidates who pass that examination study 
Algebra 2 in the Academy. 

Normal candidates for the Upper Middle Classical Class are required to take the Acad- 
emy's examination on its first year's work in Algebra, described on page 50. If the 
candidate can secure credit at college for Elementary Algebra Complete (Mathematics A, 
as defined jby the College Entrance Examination Board), he should do so, and the Acad- 
emy's examination in Algebra is waived. 

18 



two years' work in English, as described on page 48. 
two years' work in Latin, as described on pages 44-45. 
two years' work in French (or German) as described on 
pages 45-46. 

one year's work in German (or French) or Greek, as des- 
cribed on pages 46-45-44. 

As a substitute for any of its examinations the Academy will 
accept grades of 60% or better obtained on a corresponding 
examination of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
It will also accept credits already established (by examination 
or certificate) at the college for which the candidate is preparing. 
Candidates who have completed a subject which they do not 
wish to continue should obtain credit at college for that sub- 
ject instead of taking the Academy's examination. The 
Academy's examinations are designed to determine a candi- 
date's ability to do further work in a subject and ordinarily do 
not give credit for a subject that is not to be continued. 
g en f or Each Upper Middler in the Academy at the 

Classes 6nC ^ °^ Upper Middle year takes preliminary 

college examinations. Candidates for admission 
to the Senior Classes, therefore, should secure credit, at the col- 
lege for which they are preparing, for the work of the Acad- 
emy's three lower years or its equivalent. These credits are ob- 
tained by passing college entrance examinations, or, in the case 
of those colleges which admit on the certificate plan, by pres- 
enting to the college such certificates as it requires. 

The Academy occasionally admits to its Senior Class candi- 
dates for admission to college by the so-called "new plan". No 
candidate will be accepted on this basis unless he has completed 
an approved equivalent of the three lower years in the Academy, 
and has made an especially good record in scholarship. He must 
pass entrance examinations set by the Academy in those sub- 
jects already studied which he will continue. 

Students are not admitted to the Senior Class later than the 
beginning of the winter term. 

19 



ni .j, , . Candidates who are admitted to the Academy 
Classification . .. . _ ... , . , 

and secure credits in the ways indicated in the 

preceding paragraphs are rated as 

Juniors, if credited with fewer than 10 hours of the Acad- 
emy's courses; 
Lower Middlers, if credited with 10 to 27 hours; 
Upper Middlers, if credited with 28 to 44 hours; 
Seniors, if credited with 45 hours. 

Procedure ^ n ma ^ m ^ application for admission to the 

, . Academy the form in the back of this catalogue 

should be used. It should be filled out care- 
fully and completely and forwarded to the Principal of the 
Academy. Testimonial letters may either accompany it or be 
sent later. 

Certificates of standing in schools formerly attended are 
required. At the close of the school year, in June, the Academy 
sends to these institutions for complete official records of the 
candidates' work. 

Each candidate should take in June such examinations as the 
requirements outlined on pages 18-19 demand. Candidates 
should not count on qualifying by means of September exam- 
inations without definite assurance from the school authorities 
of the possibility of their admission in this way. The pressure 
for admission in recent years makes such procedure difficult. 
Those who take college examinations or secure certificate credits 
at college should forward official returns to the Academy as 
soon as they are received. 

Present members of the school are allowed first choice in room 
reservations for the following year. Rooms are regularly as- 
signed to accepted applicants about July 1, and in the order in 
which their applications are filed. Space for indicating room 
preference is provided on the admission application form. 

20 



Entrance Phillips Academy entrance examinations for 

Examinations canc ^ ates ^ or ^ e J un i° r > Lower Middle, and 
Dates and Upper Middle classes, and "new plan" candi- 
Places dates for the Senior class will be held on Tuesday 

and Wednesday, June 21 and 22, 1921. Can- 
didates must register between 9.00 A.M. and 9.30 A.M. at one 
of the following places: 

Andover: Phillips Academy, Graves Hall. 

Chicago: Northwestern University Building, corner Lake 

and Dearborn Sts. 
New York: Y. M. C. A. Building, 215 West 23rd St. 

Examinations will be held in other large cities, in June only, 
if the number of candidates in any locality is sufficient. 

On Tuesday, September 13, 1921, examinations will be held at 
9.30 A.M., in Andover only, according to a schedule of rooms 
and hours announced at that time. 

For examinations held in Andover on these regular dates no 
fees are charged. For examinations held outside of Andover and 
for special entrance examinations held at other times than those 
here given a fee of $5.00 is required. 

Specimen examination papers will be supplied upon request. 

~ . . No special students, except foreigners, are re- 

, 7 , ceived in the Junior or Lower Middle year, and 

Students ^ A , . ... . . 

the Academy makes no provision lor special 

students who are not candidates for graduation, or for entrance 

to college, scientific school, or professional school. 

Special courses may be arranged in the Upper Middle and 

Senior years, only at the written request of parents and by 

special Faculty vote. 

Diploma The diploma of the Academy is granted to 

Requirements students who have secured passing grades 
(a) in all required subjects in the course selected, 



£1 



(6) in subjects which amount to at least 68 hours of the 
curriculum, 

(c) in a sufficient number of the subjects recognized by the 
College Entrance Examination Board to complete 15 units, 

(d) in all subjects pursued in the senior year. 

_ . M . Written examinations are held in each study at 
Examinations . . . ■« v • i i 

^ least once a term, but the term grading is based 

Promotions ° n ^ e resu ^ s °^ D °^ n written examinations and 
daily work. A student who is guilty of dis- 
honesty in an examination may be suspended or dismissed. At 
the close of each term, a report of the student's scholarship 
and attitude towards his work is sent to his parents or guardian. 
Mid-term reports are also sent for all students whose work is 
below the passing grade, 60% and for those who obtain grades 
of 80% and above. 

Q^ ass Each student is assigned to the special care of 

n j£ a member of the Faculty who is known as his 

Class Officer. This officer arranges the sched- 
ule of studies for each member of the class under his charge, 
and recommends such subsequent changes as seem desirable. 

. . The entire school is divided into groups of 

Dwxsxon 

nm approximately twenty students each. Each 

^ group is assigned to the special charge of an 

instructor whose duty it is to familiarize himself with the 
previous history and present standing of the several members 
and to serve as their counselor. 

APPOINTMENTS 



7.45 a.m. Morning chapel. 



Recitation 
and study hours. 



8.07 a.m. to 1.00 P.M. 
Daily 4.07 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 

Appointments 8.00 p.m. Evening study hours begin. 

10.30 a.m. and 5.15 p.m. Sunday chapel services. 
Wednesday and Saturday afternoons are half -holidays. 
22 



St d E i rs Students are expected to occupy themselves 
^ * with their studies or other school work during 



all study hours 
Absences 



Every absence of the student from recitation, 
morning chapel, Sunday service, or from his 
room during study hours, must be accounted for. The accumu- 
lation of eight unexcused absences involves suspension from 
school. In all cases of illness, notice must be sent at once to the 
Medical Adviser, who investigates daily all cases reported. 

Special importance is attached to meeting all appointments 
immediately preceding and following vacation and recess periods. 
A failure to meet such appointments must be regarded as a very 
serious offence and may necessitate withdrawal from school. 

Out of town ^ out-of-town excuses must be obtained from 
^ the Principal. On half-holidays and on spe- 

cial holidays such excuses are granted occa- 
sionally to those whose school standing is good. The student 
who goes out of town without permission forfeits his connection 
with the school. 

„ 7 . . Students are required to be present at mornine 

Religious , . J 1 . . . ~% i 

_ . chapel. Ihe ^undav services m the Chapel 

ILXeTClSt 's 

and the religious work of the school are in 
charge of the School Minister, who is also the pastor of the 
Academy Church, an undenominational organization. Dis- 
tinguished clergymen are frequently invited to preach to the 
school. Voluntary communion services are held in the Chapel 
during the year. The Society of Inquiry (the Christian Associa- 
tian of the school) holds a voluntary meeting on Sunday 
evening, which is often addressed by an invited speaker. Dur- 
ing the winter term this society maintains a number of volun- 
tary Bible and Discussion Groups led by members of the faculty. 

Upon written request from their parents, students may be 
excused to attend the morning services of the Protestant Epis- 
copal, Baptist, or Roman Catholic churches. 

i3 



EXPENSES 



Parents can estimate approximately the expenses of their sons 
at the Academy, and they are particularly requested not to 
furnish money beyond what is necessary for modest expendi- 
tures. Pupils who are supplied with much spending money, 
or who are allowed to incur debts, often accomplish little in 
their studies, and are liable to form habits which require their 
withdrawal from the school. Parents are earnestly requested 
to refuse permission to their sons to contract debts. The 
schedules of the items named below indicate the ordinary cost 
for limited, average, and ample expenditure. 

*Economical Moderate Liberal 

Tuition, $200.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Room, light, and heat, 40.00 200.00 250.00 

Board, 245.00 280.00 400.00 

Athletic charge, 12.00 20.00 20.00 



$497.00 $700.00 $870.00 

*Scholarship boys by earnest endeavor may meet these charges in part or 
in whole. 

T . . „ . /7 The tuition for the year is $200.00 divided as 
iuxtxon Bills follows . thr ee-fifths, or $120.00, payable Oct- 
ober 1; two-fifths, or $80.00, payable on March 1. Each student 
is required to deposit with the Treasurer on entering the school 
the sum of $20.00 to cover breakage and other obligations which 
may be incurred during the school year. The balance remaining 
after such charges have been deducted will be returned. 

An additional charge of $10.00 is made to members of the 
Senior class to cover the expenses of Commencement. A 
rebate of $1.50 from this charge is made if the student fails 
to secure his diploma. Students in Chemistry and Physics 
are charged for the supplies which they use. All bills are mailed 
to parents or guardians, or may be paid in person by the 
students. Class-room privileges will be denied to students 
whose bills are not settled on or before the dates mentioned 

24 



above. As instructors must be engaged and other provisions 
for education must be made by the school authorities for the 
entire year in advance, tuition charges will not be refunded when 
students are suspended, dismissed, or withdrawn during the school 
year. Checks should be drawn in favor of the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy. 

T j. A charge of four dollars a day to each stu- 

Service dent is made for infirmary service which in- 

cludes room, board, and services of the regular 
nursing staff. Extra charges are made for operations and 
diseases requiring special nursing. 

Athletic Fee ^ charge of $20.00 is made for the main- 
tenance of athletics, but for scholarship appli- 
cants this charge is $12.00 a term which may be paid wholly 
or in part by the performance of special work assigned by the 
Treasurer. Three-fifths of the total amount of this charge 
is payable October 1st, and two-fifths on March 1st. Students 
are not asked to contribute further to the financial support 
of the various school teams. 

Room Rents Payments for student rooms in the school 
buildings are required as follows: three-fifths 
of the entire yearly rental on or before October 1 ; the remaining 
two-fifths on March 1. A deposit of $25.00, which will be 
credited to the first regular payment of room rent, is required 
when the contract for the room is filed and the assignment 
made. When a room is assigned to a student, his parent or 
guardian agrees by contract to pay the entire rental of the room 
up to the close of the current school year, whether the student con- 
tinues a member of the Academy or not. The right is reserved 
by the Trustees to transfer boys from room to room in the 
school buildings whenever changes seem desirable; such changes, 
however, do not relieve the original occupants from the obliga- 
tion of meeting the entire year's rent unless newcomers are 
secured to fill the vacancies. 



25 



Each room is furnished with a rug, desk, chiffonier, chairs, 
bed, and bedding. Towels are not included. 

No refund of deposits will be made until the close of books for 
the fiscal year, June 30. 

PRICES OF ROOMS FOR 1921-1922 ' 

SINGLE ROOMS 
$100.00 Andover, Nos. 3, 5; Clement, No. 6; Pease, No. 14; Woods, No. 8. 
$125 . 00 Churchill, No. 4; Hardy, Nos. 4, 5. 
$135 . 00 Woods, No. 7. 

$150.00 Churchill, No. 6; Clement, Nos. 3, 5, 8; Tucker, Nos. 2, 4, 5; Tower, 

Nos. 1, 3. 
$160.00 Woods, No. 5. 
$175 . 00 Tower, Nos. 2, 4, 5. 

$200.00 Churchill, No. 3; Clement, Nos. 4, 7; Farrar, No. 3; Hardy, Nos. 1, 

2, 3; Taylor, Nos. 5, 12, 19, 26. 
$225.00 Bishop, No. 34; Day, Nos. 15, 34; Taylor, Nos. 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 

22, 27. 

$250.00 Abbot, Nos. 13, 14; Adams, Nos. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20; Bishop, 
Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; Clark, Nos. 
5, 6, 7, 10, 15; Clement, No. 1; Day, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 
19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; Phillips, Nos. 3, 4, 7, 10, 14, 15, 18, 21; 
Taylor, Nos, 7, 14, 21, 28. 

$275 . 00 Clement, No. 2. 

SINGLE SUITES 
$250.00 Clement, No. 13; Eaton, Nos. 3, 4. 

$300. 00 Andover, No. 4; Bartlet, Nos. 4, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 23, 24, 27, 28; Clark 
No. 12. 

$325 . 00 Adams, Nos. 1, 7, 18, 24; Bishop, Nos. 7, 13, 36; Day, Nos. 13, 36. 

DOUBLE ROOMS 

$135 . 00 Abbot, Nos. 4, 5, 7, 16; Farrar, Nos. 4, 6; Pease, Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. 
$150. 00 Churchill, Nos. 2, 5; Clark, No. 14, Tucker, No. 3. 
$200.00 Clark, Nos. 2, 3, 8, 9, 11; Tucker, No. 1. 

DOUBLE SUITES 
$160. 00 Abbot, Nos. 6, 15; Farrar, No. 5. 

$200.00 Andover, Nos. 1, 6, 9; Draper, Nos. 1, 3, 5, 6; Eaton, Nos. 1, 5, 6; 

Pemberton, Nos. 1, 3, 5, 6; W T oods, No. 6. 
$225.00 Bancroft, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 18. 



26 



$250.00. Adams, Xos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 23; Bartlet, Nos. 1, 2, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 30: Bishop, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 
33, 35; Clark, No. 13; Day, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21, 23, 
27, 29, 33, 35; Taylor, Nos. 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25. 

8275.00 Phillips, Xos. 2, 12 

$300.00. Phillips, Xos. 1, 8, 11, 13, 19, 22. 

$350.00. Bartlet, Xos. 7, 20. 



About twenty "room scholarships" amount- 
. ing to approximately 850.00 each are available 
^ for deserving boys. These scholarships will be 
credited to the regular room charges on the recipients' term 
bills and will be awarded by the Principal to boys whose cir- 
cumstances compel them to keep their expenses at a low average. 
. . jJqH ^he equipment of the Academy includes a 
imng a well-appointed Dining Hall which accommo- 
dates two hundred and fifty boys. A fixed charge of 84.50 a 
week, payable one term in advance, has been made during the 
year 19-20-19*21 to cover light, heat, sen-ice, and food such as 
soups, vegetables, cereals, bread, butter, milk, coffee, tea, etc. 
Meats, fish, eggs, and desserts are served a la carte at cost and 
are charged against meal-tickets which are sold at 85.00 each. 
The average cost has been about 88.00 a week. 

. ^ About sixteen private houses in the vicinity of 

the Academy, under license from the Trustees, 
provide board and lodgings for students, 
and no student may occupy any house not thus licensed by the 
school. Some of the houses provide furnished rooms only; 
others provide rooms and board, and some furnish board for 
students rooming in neighboring houses. The price of table 
board is 810.00 and 812.00 a week. Students rooming in private 
families may, if they desire, board at the Dining Hall. The 
price of furnished rooms, including ordinary service, is from 
$5.00 to 87.50 a week. 

As engagements for rooms in private families continue to 
the end of the Academic year, care should be exercised in the 



selection of rooms. Engagements for table board may, on 
suitable notice, be terminated at the close of any term. Ar- 
rangements and payments for room and board in private houses 
must be made with those in charge of the houses. 



SUMMARY OF PAYMENTS 

Tuition: 1st payment, Oct. 1; $120.00 2nd payment, March 1; $80.00 

Athletic Fee: 1st " "1; 12.00 2nd " " 1; 8.00 

Room: 1st " " 1; three- 2nd " "1; two- 

fifths of total charge. fifths of total charge. 

Deposit: Payable October 1; amount, $20.00. 
Graduation Fee: Payable March 1; amount, $10.00. 
Table Board: Payable one term in advance. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Williams Hall ^ nrou S n the generosity of Prof. Edward H. 
A Dormitor for Williams, Jr., of the class of 1868, the school 
„ ^ in 1910 secured possession of a valuable piece of 

property for the housing and care of younger 
boys. The property, comprising several acres, adjoins the Old 
Campus and is within a short distance of the other school 
buildings. 

Williams Hall has attractive accommodations for twenty- 
four boys. The rooms are spacious, light, and airy, and are 
heated with hot water and lighted with electricity. On the 
main floor is a common reading and recreation room. Table 
board is furnished in the building to all occupants of the house. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to provide in this building sur- 
roundings as helpful as possible for the best development of 
young boys, and to this end they have placed it in charge of a 
married instructor. Boys whose work is below standard may 
be required to report at seven-thirty each evening, where they 
work under supervision and are free to consult the resident 
instructor and his assistant in regard to their studies. 



28 



Williams Hall supplies a stepping-stone between the natural 
restrictions of the home and the somewhat freer life of a large 
school. Although the boys who live here have all the advan- 
tages that Phillips Academy offers, they are under somewhat 
closer supervision than is customary throughout the rest of the 
school. For the school year 1921-22 the charge for room and 
board in Williams Hall, not including the regular tuition charge, 
will be $650.00. A limited number of room scholarships are 
awarded annually in this hall. A special circular explaining 
in detail the equipment and arrangements of Williams Hall, 
and containing both interior and exterior views of this building, 
will be furnished on request. 

„ . jj The school provides for dormitory purposes 

ten houses formerly occupied as private dwel- 
lings. These houses are suitable for younger boys, especially 
those who are members of the two lower classes. Each house 
is in charge of a resident instructor. The rooms are furnished, 
and the charges include heat, light, and care of the rooms. 

The Abbot House provides accommodations for eighteen boys, 
the Churchill House for seven, the Clark House for twenty -six, 
the Clement House for thirteen, the Farrar House for seven, 
the Hardy House for five, the Pease House for nine, the Tower 
House for five, the Tucker House for seven, and the Woods 
House for five. 

Dormitories Through the generous gifts of Mr. Melville C. 

Day of the class of 1858, Mr. Warren F. Draper 
of the class of 1843, and a number of citizens of Andover, and by 
the purchase of the property formerly belonging to the Andover 
Theological Seminary, the Academy now possesses thoroughly 
modern dormitories providing at reasonable rates attractive 
accommodations for almost the entire student body. Below is 
given a brief description of these various buildings, and a list 
of the prices of rooms in each will be found on pages 26-27. With 
the exception of some of the Faculty Houses and Williams Hall 



29 



these buildings are of brick. All are furnished, heated by 
steam, lighted by electricity, and equipped with shower-baths 
and the modern sanitary conveniences. Most of the study 
rooms have open fireplaces. Each building or entry is in charge 
of a resident instructor. 

Phillips Hall, erected in 1808, was entirely remodeled in 
1912. It is divided by a fire wall into two separate entries and 
provides accommodations for fourteen boys in each entry. 

Bartlet Hall was erected in 1817 and entirely rebuilt in 19 15 . 
This building also is divided by a fire wall into two separate 
entries, and contains both double and single suites, accommo- 
dating twenty-one boys in each entry. 

Pemberton Cottage, erected in 1891, contains five double 
suites. 

Andover Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double 
suites, one single suite, and two single rooms. 

Draper Cottage, erected in 1892, contains five double 
suites. 

Eaton Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double suites 
and two single suites. 

Bancroft Hall, erected in 1900, contains fourteen double 
suites. The building is divided by fire walls into three separate 
entries, each entry accommodating ten boys. 

Day Hall, erected in 1911, contains twelve double suites, two 
single suites, and twenty single rooms. The building is divided 
by a fire wall into two separate entries, each entry accommo- 
dating twenty-three boys. 

Bishop Hall, erected in 1911, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Day Hall and accommodates the same 
number of boys. 

30 



Adams Hall, erected in 1912, is divided into two separate 
entries, each of which, like the Faculty Houses, is in charge of 
a married instructor. Each entry accommodates eighteen boys. 



Taylor Hall, erected in 1913, accommodates eighteen boys 
in each of its two entries and is in charge of two married in- 
structors. 

(For prices of rooms see pages 26-27.) 

Main This recitation building was erected in 1865 

Building and contains twelve recitation rooms. 



Graves Hall 



Graves Hall, devoted to Science, contains in 
addition to the large and well-equipped labora- 
tories for Physics and Chemistry, four recitation rooms, a 
lecture room, and a drafting room. 

_ TT „ Pearson Hall, erected in 1817 and remodeled in 

Pearson Hall , olw> . , , Tl 

1878, is used for recitation purposes. It con- 
tains six large recitation rooms. 



Archaeology 
Building 



This building contains rooms for the collection 
of the Department of Archaeology and a lecture 
room. 



Peabody House 



Peabody House bears the name of the founders 
of the Archaeological department, with the 
funds of which it was erected. The building carries out the 
expressed wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody that their bene- 
faction should promote the social interests of the student body 
as well as further the study of American Archaeology. Quar- 
ters are provided for the Phillips Union and include a well- 
appointed grill, a large and attractive reading room, and a 
memorial room used as an assembly hall for receptions, lectures, 
and meetings of the various organizations of the school. 

31 



j j • • ■ . . Brechin Hall is used for administrative and 
Administration . 
Offices and library purposes. I he lower floor contains 
T L the offices of the Principal, the Treasurer, 

and the Registrar. A large hall on the upper 
floor is devoted to the library of about thirteen thousand vol- 
umes, which is in charge of a trained librarian and is open 
daily for the use of students. 

The Ch el ^ e ^apel, erected in 1875 and enlarged in 
1920, provides accommodations for the religious 
exercises of the school. The daily morning chapel exercises 
and the Sunday preaching and vesper services are held in this 
building. The Chapel contains the William Couch Egleston 
memorial organ. 

Borden ^ 6 ^ ca d emv nas a l ar £ e gymnasium, com- 

r . pletely equipped with modern apparatus, and 

in charge of a Physical Director who is also 
the Medical Adviser. Students of all classes are required to take 
regular gymnasium work. 

Swimming Pool The s ™ mmin 8 f* adjoining the gymnas- 
ium, is seventy-five feet long and thirty feet 
wide, and represents the most modern ideas in swimming pool 
construction. The elaborate filtration plant in the basement of 
the building assures the purity of the water used in the pool. 

The swimming pool was constructed in 1910 with funds se- 
cured entirely by the efforts of the students themselves. 

Philli s Inn ^ e sc ^°°^ P ro P er ty includes a well-equipped 
hotel, situated near the centre of the grounds, 
under lease to a manager, and furnishing to parents and friends 
of the school quiet and comfortable accommodations. 

The Isham ^ e ^ cac ^ em y m aintains an infirmary, the gen- 
7 j. erous gift of Miss Flora E. Isham, whose name 

it bears. The infirmary was completed in 1912, 
is thoroughly modern in all its appointments, and was carefully 

32 



planned under the direction of experts in hospital construction. 
In addition to the general wards, it contains single rooms for 
those requiring special treatment, an operating room, and quart- 
ers for visiting parents. The contagious wards are completely 
separated from the ordinary wards, and at each end of the build- 
ing there is a large sun parlor entirely encased in glass. Boys 
who are sufficiently indisposed to be unable to attend classes 
are sent to the infirmary for proper care. Except when special 
arrangements have been made in advance by parents or guar- 
dians, the following regulations will be observed in the conduct 
of the infirmary. Patients at the infirmary requiring medical 
attention shall call in local physicians approved by the school 
authorities. In cases requiring the attendance of special- 
ists, the best men available in Boston will be called in con- 
sultation. In special emergencies, when operations seem 
necessary and parents cannot be consulted in advance, the 
Principal of the school assumes responsibility for authorizing 
such operations. The Medical Adviser may at any time 
examine and report upon individual cases. 

Athletic Brothers' Field, comprising twenty -three acres, 

^Grounds * S * n c ^ ose P roxmi ^y to the gymnasium and 

contains ample facilities for baseball, foot- 
ball, and track athletics. The Academy possesses other exten- 
sive grounds for various athletic sports, including baseball, 
football, soccer, and tennis. 

Bulletin The bulletin, a magazine devoted to the in- 

terests and history of the school and its alum- 
ni, is published four times a year and sent to all former 
members of Phillips Academy whose addresses are known. 



S3 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND ENDOWMENT 



Scholarshi ^ G sums g rari ted as scholarships vary accord-> 

ing to the excellence of the boys in their 
studies, a student of the highest rank receiving 
a sum equivalent to the full tuition fee and room rent. Every 
new applicant for a scholarship must pay on entering the Aca- 
demy the sum of $50 toward his tuition. This sum is not re- 
mitted. At the close of each term scholarships are adjusted 
in accordance with the student's record in his studies during 
that term. Boys of limited means who possess scholarly ability 
and ambition are encouraged to apply for admission, and, if 
admitted, may be reasonably sure of financial assistance. 

„ . , Furnished rooms are set apart in various 

« . . - dormitories for boys who are obliged to keep 

Provision for . ... . . . °- 

o i 7 j • d their expenses witnm the lowest possible 

limits. A rental of $40 to $50 is charged each 

occupant of these rooms. Choice of room is determined by the 

scholarship rank of the applicant. 

q jr tt j Ample opportunities are afforded by the Acad- 

emy to scholarship boys to earn a portion of 
their school charges. Service in the Dining Hall and boarding 
houses enables them to earn their board. Several agencies are 
assigned by the Bureau of Self Help and a number of students 
may earn a portion of the school charges by work in connec- 
tion with the school offices, and in caring for recitation rooms. 
An energetic boy may find various other chances for remunera- 
tive work. 

q i j i- The Students' Educational Fund, begun with a 

„ , gift of $100 from the Senior Class of 1854, now 

tunas Aer 

amounts to $5,700. 

The Farrar Fund, a legacy from a former Treasurer, Samuel 
Farrar, established in 1865, amounts, with additions from 
income, to $22,000. 

34 



The Clarice Scholarship Fund of $1,200 was established in 1870 
in memory of Mrs. John Aiken Clarke. 

The Samuel H. Taylor Memorial Fund of $3,700 was estab- 
lished in 1871. 

The Peter Smith Byers Scholarship of $500 was established in 
1878 by the late John Byers. 

The Class of 1878 Scholarship Fund, established by the Classi- 
cal Class of 1878, amounts to $896.96. 

The Jonathan Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1878 by the late Edward Taylor in memory of his father. 

The French Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 1879 by 
the bequest of Hiram W. French. 

The Caroline Parker Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1880 by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy. 

The Alden Memorial Fund of $5,000, a legacy from the late 
Dr. Ebenezer Alden, was established in 1881. 

The Gerard Sumner Wig gin Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1881 by the bequest of Lady Elizabeth Sumner 
Buckley-Mathew Fleming. 

The Stone Educational Fund of $25,000 was established in 
1882 by Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Warren F. Draper Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Warren F. Draper. 

The Richards Scholarship of $1,450 was established in 1889 
by the late Mrs. Mary A. Richards in memory of her sons. 

The Charles L. Flint Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the bequest of Hon. Charles L. Flint. 

The Henry P, Haven Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1890 by the estate of Henry P. Haven. 

The Emma Lane Smyth Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1890 by the late Ex-Governor Frederick Smyth of New 
Hampshire. 



35 



The James and Per sis Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Mrs. Mary E. Fairbanks. 

The Dowe Scholarship Fund, established in 1892 by the be- 
quest of Joseph Dowe, amounts to $3,097.98. 

The John Cornell Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was established 
in 1894 by the bequest of John Cornell for pupils from the town 
of Andover. 

The James Calvin Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was founded 
in 1895 by his sister, the late Mrs. Mary W. Fairbanks. 

The Mary W. Eolbrook Fund of $500 was founded in 1900 
by legacy of Mary W. Holbrook. 

The Edward Taylor Fund, a legacy from the late Edward 
Taylor, established in 1900, amounts to $1,000. 

The Ruby A. Carter Scholarship of $1,500 was founded in 1905 
by the late Mrs. Ruby A. Carter, in memory of her husband 
and daughter. 

The Herman Verhosff Hartwell Scholarship of $2,000 was 
founded in 1907 by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Hartwell in memory 
of their son. 

The Timothy A. Holt Scholarship Fund of $26,000 was estab- 
lished in 1908 by the bequest of Timothy A. Holt, for the benefit 
of pupils from the town of Andover. 

The James Huntington Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1910 by the widow and daughter of James Huntington, 
P. A. 1848. 

The Charles Clayton Clough Memorial Fund of $220 was 
founded in 1912 by his friends. 

The Allan Morse Penfield Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1913 by the legacy of Allan Morse Penfield, P. A. 1904. 

The George B. Knapp Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1914 by a legacy of Miss Katharine Knapp. 



36 



The James Greenleaf Fuller Memorial Scholarship of $200 is 
sustained by Samuel Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, in memory of his 
brother, and is available during his Senior year for a student 
of limited means, who in the judgment of the Principal embodies 
the best ideals of school life in scholarship, character, and 
influence. 

The Class of 1871 Andover-Harvard Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by Henry S. Van Duzer, P. A. 1871, is awarded on the 
basis of high scholarship to a member of the Senior class who is 
preparing for Harvard; the award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his record 
up to that time. 

The Class of 1871 Harvard- Andover Scholarship of $300, also 
sustained by Henry S. Van Duzer, is available for a graduate of 
Phillips Academy during his Freshman year in Harvard Col- 
lege; the award, based on high scholarship, is made by the 
faculty of Phillips Academy, and is announced at the close of 
the recipient's Senior year in the school. 

The Henry P. Wright Scholarship of $300, sustained by an 
alumnus of the Academy in memory of Henry P. Wright, P. A. 
1863, late dean of Yale College, is awarded on the basis of high 
scholarship and character to a member of the Senior Class who 
is preparing for Yale. The award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his 
record up to that time. 

The Winston Trowbridge Townsend Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by John A. Keppelman, P. A. '97, in memory of his class- 
mate and friend, Winston Trowbridge Townsend, is awarded 
at graduation to that member of the Senior class preparing for 
Yale, who, in the judgment of the Principal, is entitled, through 
scholarship, character, and influence, to special commendation. 

The Howard W. Beat Memorial Scholarship of $200, sustained 
by a member of the class of 1894, is awarded annually by the 
Principal to a worthy student of limited means. 



37 



The Robert Henry Coleman Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$6000 was established in 1919 by Mrs. John Coleman in memory 
of her son, Robert Henry Coleman, P. A. 1912, who died in the 
service of his country in the Great War. The annual income 
from this fund (approximately $300) is awarded, at the end of 
his Junior year, to a student of limited means, who, in the judg- 
ment of the Principal, has displayed the most promise of main- 
taining the highest standard of worth, measured by character, 
scholarship, and general influence in the school. 

The George Webster Otis Scholarship of $250, sustained by 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Otis in memory of their son George 
Webster Otis of the Class of 1914, who died in the military 
service of his country, is awarded to a student who in the 
judgment of the Principal combines the qualities of sound 
character and high ambition. 

The George Xavier McLanahan Memorial Fund of $10,000 
in memory of George Xavier McLanahan of the class of 1892, 
was established in 1919 by his mother and sister. The in- 
come is to be used for the assistance of a worthy student, or 
students, of limited means. 

The Gordon Ferguson Allen Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$5000 was established in 1920 by friends of the school, and the 
income is available for a deserving student of character and 
promise, and of limited means. 

The LeRoy Martin Scholarship of $500, sustained by a brother, 
is available for a Phillips Academy graduate of limited means 
during his Freshman year in Yale University : the award is made 
by the Principal at the close of the recipient's Senior year in the 
school and on the basis of character and ability. 

The Rev. William Henry and Ellen Gary Haskell Scholarship 
Fund of $3,000 was established in 1920 through the contribu- 
tions of the Rev. William Henry Haskell, P.A. 1856, and his sons, 
Dr. Nelson C. Haskell, P. A. 1883, William S. Haskell, P. A. 



38 



1888, the estate of Dr. Pearl Tenney Haskell, P. A. 1888, Dr. 
Harris B. Haskell, P. A. 1890, and Edward Kirk Haskell, P. A. 
1895; the income to be used in aiding a needy and deserving 
student to meet the regular expenses of the school. 

The Roger C. Sullivan Scholarships were founded in 1921 by 
Boetius H. Sullivan, P. A. 1905, in memory of his father. Four 
scholarships of $250 each are awarded annually to those mem- 
bers of the Junior, Lower Middle, Upper Middle, and Senior 
Classes respectively who have made the greatest improvement 
in scholarship during the school year. The awards are made in 
June and the scholarships become available to the recipients 
during the following academic year. 

The John P. Hopkins Scholarship of $250, founded in 1921 
by Boetius H. Sullivan, P. A. 1905, is awarded annually to that 
member of the student body whose record for the school year 
is free from demerit, absence, and tardy marks. In case more 
than one candidate shall have met the terms of this requirement 
the award shall be determined by the Faculty and on the basis of 
the general records of the candidates. In case no student is 
found to have completed the year free from demerit, absence, and 
tardy marks the Faculty shall determine which candidate has 
most nearly met the terms of the requirements as specified and 
shall make the award accordingly. 

The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship of fifty dollars 
is awarded annually to a member of the Academy, preference 
being given to a son of a member of the association. 

The John Reed Williams Scholarship is available to Phillips 
Academy graduates at Yale under the following terms of gift: 

"The income from the John Reed Williams Fund of one thousand dollars, 
* * * is awarded annually at the close of Freshman or Sophomore year, * * * 
to a member of the Academic Freshman or Sophomore class, preferably from 
Phillips Academy, Andover, who is helping to support himself by his own efforts 
and has proved himself to be a man of high character, and of large promise, 
especially in English Literature or History." 



39 



The Columbia University Scholarship. A scholarship, which 
practically amounts to the tuitionVharges, is granted by Colum- 
bia University each year to a student of Phillips Academy who 
has satisfied the full requirements for admission to the College, 
and whose standing in the Academy has been of sufficiently 
high grade to gain the recommendation of the school faculty. 
The scholarship may be renewed in the years following the 
Freshman year if a high grade is maintained. 

The Wesley an University Scholarship. Wesley an University 
grants each year to a student of Phillips Academy going to the 
University, a scholarship equal in amount to the tuition bill 
of the Freshman year. Provided the quality of his work 
warrants it, the scholarship is renewed each year throughout 
the college course. The award is made to that student whose 
high scholarship, in the opinion of the Academy Faculty, en- 
titles him to the scholarship. 

In addition to these scholarships, prizes amounting to $770.00 
are awarded annually. The conditions governing these prizes 
are given on pages 56-60. 



40 



SYNOPSIS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY 



As the subjects are taught with a view to the student's pro- 
gressive development, it is desirable for him to take the entire 
course in the Academy. In recent years the Academy has been 
forced to limit rigidly the number admitted to its Senior classes. 
In order that the student may plan his work to the greatest 
advantage, it is important that he decide as early as possible 
upon the higher institution which he intends to enter. The 
course of study is designed to furnish adequate preparation for 
any college or scientific school. 



THE CLASSICAL COURSE 

— JUNIOR CLASS III —LOWER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 

a week Required a week 

5 English 2 4 

*1 French 4 

**5 Latin 2 5 

5 German 1 or Greek 1 4 

16 17 



CLASS IV 



Required 
Algebra 1 
English 1 
French 1 
Latin 1 



Hours 

Required a week 

Algebra 2 4 

English 3 4 

Latin 3 5 

German 2 4 

or Greek 2 5 



17 or 18 



CLASS II — UPPER MIDDLE 



Hours 

Elective a week 

Chemistry °4 

French 3 4 

German 1 4 

Greek 1 4 

American History 4 

^Ancient History 5 

English History 5 

Physics °4 

Spanish 1 4 



Hours 

Elective a week 

Bible 1 2 
Greek Testament 1 
Classical History 2 
Geography 2 



Numbers placed at the right and above a subject indicate successive courses in the same 
subject. The courses are described on pages 44-55. References are to footnotes on page 42. 



41 



CLASS I — SENIOR 

Hours Hours Hours 

Required a week Elective a week Elective a week 

English 4 4 Algebra 3 2 Archaeology 1 

Plane Geometry 4 Chemistry °4 Bible 1 or 2 2 

Electives 10 Mechanical Drawing t3 French 4 2 

— French 3 4 German 4 2 

18 German 1 , 2 , or 3 4 Greek Testament 1 

Greek 1 or 3 4 Harmony 2 

Greek 2 5 Horace 1 

American History 4 Contemporary European 

^Ancient History 5 History 2 

English History 5 Geography 2 

Latin 4 4 Philosophy 2 

Latin Composition 1 Public Speaking 2 
Physics °4 
Spanish 1 or 2 4 
Trigonometry and 
Solid Geometry 4 



THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR 



Required 
Algebra 1 
English 1 
1 1 French 1 
Latin 1 



Hours 
a week 

5 
*1 
**5 
5 



CLASS C — LOWER MIDDLE 
Hours 

Required a week 

Algebra 2 4 
4 



English^ 
1 1 French- 
Latin 2 



16 



17 



♦This class meets twice a week, without home study. It is rated a one-hour course. 
**This class meets six times a week, twice without home study. It is rated a five-hour 
course. 

°Each laboratory period occupies two hours, but, not requiring home study, counts only 
one hour on the schedule. 

tMechanical Drawing takes six hours of class-room time, but, not requiring home 
preparation, counts only three hours on the schedule. 

jNot open to those who elect Classical History. 

1 1 German may be chosen in place of French. 



42 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 
Required a week Elective a week 



English 3 4 


French 1 or 3 


4 


Chemistry or Physics °4 


German 1 or 3 


4 


Plane Geometry 5 


American History 


4 


Electives 4 or 5 


Ancient History 


5 




English History 


5 


17 or 18 


Latin 3 


5 




Spanish 1 


4 




Bible 1 


2 




Geography 


2 



CLASS A — SENIOR 





Hours 




Hours 




Hours 


Required 


a week 


Elective 


a week 


Elective 


a week 


English 4 


4 


Algebra 3 


2 


Archaeology 




History 


4 or 5 


Chemistry 


°4 


Bible 1 or 2 


2 


Trigonometry 




Mechanical Drawing |3 


French 4 


2 


and Solid Geometry 4 


French 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


German 4 


2 


Electives 


6 or 5 


German 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


Harmony 


2 






American History 


4 


Contemporary European 




18 


Ancient History 


5 


History 


2 






English History 


5 


Geography 


2 






Latin 4 


4 


Philosophy 


2 






Physics 


°4 


Public Speaking 


2 






Spanish 1 or 2 


4 







Physical Training (3 hours a week) is required of all students. 

All Seniors must report to the Librarian for instruction in the use of the library. 



In order to define the work of the pupil in his Senior year, Upper Middlers are required 
to take preliminary examinations for some college. June examinations, both preliminary 
and final, are held in Andover by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

For references see footnotes on page 42. 



43 



STATEMENTS OF COURSES 



GREEK 

The first year (Greek 1 ) is devoted mainly to forms and the 
most essential principles of syntax. Benner and Smyth's Be- 
ginner's Greek Book is used. To aid the memorizing of inflec- 
tions and vocabularies there are daily exercises, both oral and 
written, enforced by incessant drill. During the second and 
third terms work in the grammar is supplemented by lessons 
from Freeman and Lowe's Greek Reader. 

The second year (Greek 2 ) is occupied with Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-IV, or an equivalent, with sight reading, 
translation from English into Greek, and grammar reviews. 
Great effort is made to secure simple, idiomatic English in both 
oral and written work. Grammar and composition are studied 
throughout the year and occupy a part of every recitation 
period. 

There is an elective course in the Greek Testament — one 
hour a week — open to both Upper Middlers and Seniors. 

The third year (Greek 3 ) is spent mainly in reading selected 
books of the Iliad and the Odyssey. After the dialect is mas- 
tered, more attention is given to the literary side of the poems 
and to the translation of Homer at sight, about 5000 verses 
being read during the year. 

LATIN 

The first year's work (Latin 1 ) consists of thorough drill in the 
essentials of the grammar and of training in methods of study. 
There is constant practice in the writing of Latin. In the spring 
term, Book II of Caesar's Gallic War, or an equivalent amount 
of Latin selections, is read.* 

♦This work is designed for five periods of fifty-three minutes each a week. This neces- 
sarily implies a larger total of work for the year than that of the average High School. 
Students preparing for Latin 2 should take notice of this fact. 



44 



In the second-year course (Latin 2 ) Books I, III, IV, or V of 
the Gallic War, and about ten Lives of Nepos, or an equivalent 
in selections, are read. There is continued study of Latin prose 
composition and syntax, of word formation, and of method in 
sight translation. 

In the third year (Latin 3 ) the course in Cicero aims to render 
the student familiar with the chief characteristics of Cicero's 
oratory, with his life, and with the history and antiquities of 
his time. The work in Latin prose composition is devoted to 
connected narrative based on the text studied. The Catili- 
nian Orations, the Manilian Law, the Archias, the Marcellus 
and the Milo or de Senectute or Sallust's Catiline are read. 
There is also sight reading. 

In the fourth year (Latin 4 ) poetic diction and prosody receive 
attention and every effort is made to cultivate a sympathetic 
appreciation of good literature. Books I- VI of the Aeneid, and 
the Bucolics or an equivalent amount from the Metamorphoses 
of Ovid, or Cicero's de Amicitia are read, with additional prac- 
tice in reading at sight. Topics in the private life and customs 
of the Romans are studied. 

FRENCH 

The first year's work (French 1 ) comprises the princi- 
ples of pronunciation, drill in the fundamentals of gram- 
mar including the inflections of the regular and the more 
common irregular verbs, of nouns, of adjectives, of participles, 
of pronouns; the uses of pronouns, the simple uses of the con- 
ditional and subjunctive, and the elementary rules of syntax; 
abundant easy exercises for oral translation into French, and 
the reading of about two hundred pages of easy French prose. 
The following texts have been used. Kuhn's Reader, .Super's 
Reader, Aldrich & Foster's Reader, La Tulipe Noire, L'EtS de la 
Saint-Martin, Sans Famille, and Fraser and Squair's Grammar. 

The second-year course (French 2 ) of four hours completes the 

45 



elementary work in French and prepares for the College Board 
examinations in Elementary French. It includes a review of 
elementary grammar and continued work in composition and 
translation. Such texts as Colombo,, La Mere de la Marquise, 
Le Roi des Montagues, Syntax of the the French Verb, and Com- 
fort's Composition have been used. 

The third year (French 3 ) covers the requirement of the Col- 
lege Board in Intermediate French. Contes de Daudet, La 
Debacle, Les Mis Arables, and similar texts furnish material for 
translation, and work in composition and grammar is done 
throughout the year. 

The fourth-year work (French 4 ) consists of rapid reading and 
translation of selected passages from English authors, with dis- 
cussion of helpful topics in French history and literature as they 
come in the course. This course is for those who have passed 
the college examinations and who wish to continue their work 
in the language. 

GERMAN 

The first year's work (German 1 ) includes a constant drill in 
pronunciation and a thorough course in elementary grammar. 
Abundant easy exercises are translated into German and used as 
the basis of oral and aural practice. A limited amount of mem- 
orizing of German idioms and poetry, and translation from Ger- 
man into English are required. Wesselhoeft's Elementary 
German Grammar, Bacon's German Composition, and Whitney 
and Stroebe's books have been used in this work. 

The second-year course (German 2 ) which completes the ele- 
mentary work in German, and prepares for the College Board 
examination in Elementary German, comprises a thorough re- 
view of the grammar and a considerable amount of more ad- 
vanced translation and composition. Conversational work is 
continued by the use of such helps as Pattou's An American in 
Germany. Ham and Leonard's German Grammar and Whitney 



46 



and Stroebe's Easy German Composition have been used in this 
course and various texts like Wildenbruch's Das edle Blut> 
Gerstacker's Irrfahrten, Riehl's Burg Neideck, and Schiller's 
Wilhelm Tell are read. 

The third year's work (German 3 ) prepares for the examina- 
tion in Intermediate German as set by the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. Grammar is hastily reviewed and advanced 
composition written throughout the year. Bernstorff's Hand- 
book of German Grammar, Ham and Leonard's German Gram- 
mar, and Pope's composition books have been used in this 
connection. Oral work is continued, and such texts as Frey- 
tag's Die J ournalisten, Heine's Die Harzreise, Keller's Kleider 
machen Leute, Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans, and Der Dreis- 
sigjahrige Krieg III and Fulda's Der Talisman are studied. 

The fourth-year course (German 4 ) of two hours a week is an 
elective, open to those who have passed the third year's work or 
the College Entrance Examination Board's German B, also, 
upon consultation with the instructor, to others who satisfy 
him of their ability. The course will be adapted to the maturity 
of the students and their proficiency in German. Half the time 
will be spent in conversational practice on everyday topics and 
German life and institutions, the remainder in rapid reading and 
interpretation of some phase of German literature. Wagner's 
Tannhduser has been studied and the original Middle High 
German poems of the old singers discussed and put into modern 
German. Students in this course are not recommended for ad- 
ditional college credits in German. 

SPANISH 

The first year's work (Spanish 1 ) is as follows: — (a) thorough 
drill in the principles of pronunciation; (b) rules of syntax and 
essentials of Spanish grammar including the inflection of verbs 
(regular and irregular), nouns, adjectives, pronouns, the uses of 
the conditional and subjunctive; (c) abundant easy exercises for 
translation into Spanish; (d) the translation of two hundred or 

47 



more pages of easy Spanish prose, such as is contained in Hills* 
Spanish Tales, Berge-Soler and Hatheway's Reader, Morrison's 
Tres Comedias, Alarcon's Short Stories, Isaac's Maria, and 
Supple's Spanish Reader; grammars such as De Vitis', Hills 
and Ford's, Crawford's First Book in Spanish, and Moreno- 
Lacalle's Elementos de Espanol. 

The second-year course (Spanish 2 ) completes the elementary 
course in Spanish, and prepares for the College Board exami- 
nation in this subject. It consists of a complete review of Span- 
ish grammar and continued work in composition and translation. 
Such texts as Wilkins's Second Spanish Book, El Capitan 
Veneno, Jose, Zaragueta, and Umphrey's Spanish Prose Compo- 
sition have been used. 

ENGLISH 

The work of English 1 in composition is based on themes, — 
simple narratives and descriptions — written in the class-room. 
Attention is given to the correction of grammatical errors in 
speech and writing, with necessary consideration of formal 
grammar; to elementary matters of the structure and the 
punctuation of the sentence; to spelling; and to the acquisition 
of a vocabulary. The work in literature consists in reading 
aloud and discussing in the class-room a few short works in 
verse and prose. Considerable emphasis is placed on enuncia- 
tion and pronunciation. (Students planning to enter the 
Lower Middle class in English are advised to read St. Ives, 
Nicholas Nickleby, and Les MisSrables, but equivalents will be 
accepted.) 

In the teaching of composition in English 2 , the general 
plan of the preceding year is continued, with a somewhat 
higher standard of requirement, the chief object being to 
secure plenty of practice. Themes are written outside of 
the class-room as well as during the recitation period. The 
study of some elementary matters of rhetoric is begun. 

48 



The textbook used for the work in composition is Ward's 
Sentence and Theme. The study of literature comprises the 
careful reading of some books and the rapid reading of others. 
Among the books prescribed are : Richard II, Dr. J eJcyll and Mr. 
Hyde, The Woman in White, The Virginian, and English Narra- 
tive Poems (Fuess and Sanborn). Particular attention is given 
to oral English, each student being required to deliver two care- 
fully prepared speeches each term and to read aloud in the 
class-room as frequently as possible. 

In English 3 the thorough study of formal rhetoric is begun. 
As many themes as possible are written outside of the class- 
room, and considerable writing is done in the class-room. The 
textbook used is Herrick and Damon's New Composition and 
Rhetoric. The course in literature includes the careful reading 
of six or seven books, selected in part from the list for reading (A) 
prescribed in the College Entrance Requirements; the lives 
of the authors ; and the rapid reading, optional or required, of as 
many other books as possible. 

In English 4 the principles of composition-rhetoric studied 
in the preceding year are reviewed, with a higher standard of 
requirement in their application to writing. Herrick and 
Damon's New Composition and Rhetoric is used in this year also. 
Frequent themes and writing in the class-room are required. 
The course in literature includes the rapid reading of some books 
and the careful study of others; the life and times of the chief 
authors; and as much supplementary reading as possible. The 
work of this year completes the preparation for the compre- 
hensive examination offered by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Public Speaking is taken up as part of the Lower Middle 
English course. 

An elective course in Public Speaking comprises training in 
the preparation and delivery of expositions, argumentative 

40 



speeches, and debates. A considerable amount of oral reading 
and extemporaneous speaking is done throughout the course. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

In the two curriculum courses the Bible is studied as an 
English classic. Attention is constantly given to the Biblical 
sources of common quotations and allusions. The methods and 
standards are those of the other school studies. Each of the 
courses extends through a year, with two recitation periods each 
week. 

The first course (Bible 1 ) consists of nearly all the Old Testa- 
ment narratives. The textbook is Sheffield's The Old Testament 
Narrative. If time allows, selections from the New Testament 
are taken up in the spring term. 

The second course (Bible 2 ) includes the historical books of 
the Old Testament and numerous selections from the poetical 
and prophetical writings. The textbook is the complete Old 
Testament in the King James version as published in four 
volumes in "Everyman's Library" under the title Ancient 
Hebrew Literature. 

Provision is also made in the winter term for the study of the 
life and teaching of Christ in voluntary classes led by the 
Principal and others from the faculty. 

ALGEBRA 

Algebra 1 . The study of Algebra is begun in the Junior 
year in a course occupying five hours a week throughout 
the year. Slaught & Lennes's Elementary Algebra is used as a 
textbook and Chapters I-XI and XIII-XVIII, omitting imagin- 
ary numbers, are completed. 

Algebra 2 . This course provides a review of Algebra 1 
and continues the subject through all the usual topics of Ele- 
mentary and Intermediate Algebra. It is required in Class C 
and in Class II. Candidates for entrance to the Academy 

50 



desiring credit for this course must present a college entrance 
certificate giving credit for both Elementary and Intermediate 
Algebra. 

Algebra 3 . This course covers the topics in Advanced 
Algebra specified by the College Entrance Examination 
Board and meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and 
scientific schools. If not offered for admission it may be used 
to secure advanced credit at some colleges. 

GEOMETRY 

Demonstrative Plane Geometry is begun and completed in the 
Upper Middle year of the Scientific Course and in the Senior 
year of the Classical Course. Four, or five, recitations a week 
are given to the subject. The chief aim of the instruction is to 
develop in each student the ability to reason clearly and logically. 
Accuracy, clearness, and completeness of statement are insisted 
upon. To develop originality and independence of thought 
about two-thirds of the time is devoted to the solution of exer- 
cises of gradually increasing difficulty. Candidates for entrance 
to the Academy may secure credit for this course by presenting 
a college entrance certificate giving credit for it. 

In the Senior year Solid Geometry is taught four hours a 
week during the winter term and two hours during the spring 
term. The course meets the entrance requirements of all col- 
leges and scientific schools, and, when not offered for admission, 
may be substituted for Freshman work in the subject. 

TRIGONOMETRY 

A course in Plane Trigonometry meeting four hours a week 
during the fall term and two hours during the spring term, forms, 
with Solid Geometry, a full four-hour course for the Senior year. 
It meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and scientific 
schools, and may be substituted for Freshman work in the 
subject, if not used toward admission. 

51 



MECHANICAL DRAWING 

This course consists of six hours a week. It includes the use 
of drawing instruments, lettering, geometric constructions, 
orthographic and isometric projections, developments, inter- 
sections, sectioning and working drawings. Especial stress is 
laid on a thorough mastering of the fundamentals. The course 
meets the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board and in many instances so prepares the student that he 
can obtain advance credit for the subject on his entrance to 
college. Students of exceptional ability are given an oppor- 
tunity to do the more advanced work in Machine Drawing, — 
or problems in keeping with the course to be pursued on entrance 
to college. 

PHYSICS 

The instruction in Physics is given by the use of a textbook 
and by practical work in the laboratory. The text is accom- 
panied with numerical examples and by qualitative experiments 
designed to illustrate physical laws and their application to 
practical life. 

Forty or more quantitative laboratory experiments are re- 
quired of each pupil. A careful record of the steps and results 
of these exercises is kept in a note-book which is submitted to 
the instructor for approval. 

CHEMISTRY 

The sections of the class in Chemistry, each meeting four 
times a week, cover the same ground and prepare for the 
entrance examinations in Chemistry of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

A two-hour course throughout the year prepares for the Col- 
lege Board examination in this subject and counts one half 



52 



point for college admission. It does not meet the one point 
requirement in the subject. 

The work is so arranged that students may profitably enter 
the class at various times in the year, and those who have pre- 
viously covered the ground may review the entire subject during 
the spring term. 

ARCHEOLOGY 

The work of the department is chiefly confined to the United 
States, and research in other subjects than American archaeology 
is not extensively attempted. 

At present the collections number about 96,000 specimens, 
all of which represent the stone age art. 

The publications of the department number seven : — Bulletin 
No. 1, on the Exploration of Jacob's Cavern; No. 2, The Gor- 
gets; No. 3, Field Work in Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, Arizona, 
and New Mexico; No. 4, The Exploration of Bushey Cavern and 
the Exploration of Fort Ancient; No. 5, A Study and Descrip- 
tion of the Seven Prehistoric Earthworks found near Andover; 
No. 6, A Study of Hematite Implements found in the United 
States. The Red Paint People of Maine (preliminary paper). 

HISTORY 

Courses are offered in the Ancient History, English History, 
American History, Contemporary European History. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

All students are required to take some form of exercise during 
the school year. Upon entering the school each boy receives 
a careful physical and medical examination, and a form of 
exercise suited to his peculiar needs is advised. Special atten- 
tion is given to those who lack normal development. The 
school, club, and squad teams give all students an opportunity 

53 



to compete in sports with those of their own relative ability. 
No student is allowed to compete on school teams unless per- 
mission indicating his fitness is received from the Physical 
Director. 

MUSIC 

Opportunity for the study of piano and organ is offered by 
the Department of Music. The piano instruction is in charge 
of Messrs. Felix Fox and Harrison Potter of Boston. The organ 
lessons are given by the Director of Music. 

A two-hour course in Harmony has been added to the curri- 
culum as an elective, this course preparing for the College 
Entrance Board examination. 

Students who sing in the choir, every member attending two 
rehearsals a week, are offered one of three forms of compen- 
sation; (a) financial; (b) one athletic cut a week; (c) permission 
to count the choir work as one schedule hour. 

Serious attention is given the school orchestra which re- 
hearses weekly and studies carefully both classical and modern 
compositions. 

A series of recitals is given in the school chapel on the Wednes- 
day afternoons or evenings of the winter term. The following 
afternoon recitals were played in 1921 : Jan. 19th, an organ re- 
cital by Mr. Shrewsbury, Director of Music at Phillips Exeter 
Academy; Jan. 26th, an organ recital by Mr. Richard Apple, 
Director of Music at the Episcopal Theological School, Cam- 
bridge; Feb. 9th, an organ recital by Mr. Rupert Sircom, or- 
ganist of the Church of Our Saviour, Brookline; Feb. 23rd, a 
piano recital by Mr. Albion Metcalf of Reading; Mar. 
2nd, an organ recital by Mr. Pfatteicher, Director of Music at 
the Academy, assisted by Rockwood Ferris of the student body, 
piano; Mar. 16th, an organ recital by Mr. Pfatteicher. In addi- 
tion to these, there was the annual Christmas recital, and there 
were the following evening recitals : Dec. 12th, a piano recital by 



54 



Mr. Felix Fox of Boston; Jan. 12th, a violin recital by Miss 
Irma Seydel of Boston; Feb. 2nd, an organ recital by Dr. J. F. 
Wolle, conductor of the Bethlehem Bach choir; Mar. 9th, an 
organ , recital by Pietro Yon of New York City; Mar. 23rd, a 
performance of Brahms' Requiem, arranged for piano and organ. 
On Tuesday evening, April 15th, the Pierian Sodality (orches- 
tra) of Harvard University gave a concert in the chapel ; May 6th 
there was an illustrated lecture on "The Relation of Popular to 
Classical Music" by the music critic, Dr. Sigmund Spaeth, of 
New York City. There will also be a concert by a number of 
players from the Boston Symphony Orchestra, assisted by Mr. 
Felix Fox, piano, and Mr. Pfatteicher, organ; a performance of 
classical church music by the school choir; and the usual Com- 
mencement Recital. 

PHILOSOPHY 

A two-hour course is offered in elementary philosophy, such 
as is given in many of the higher European schools. During the 
academic year 1920-21, the first term was devoted to lectures on 
Ancient Philosophy and the reading and discussion of Berkeley's 
"Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous"; the second, to lec- 
tures on Mediaeval Philosophy and the study of Jevons' "Ele- 
mentary Lessons in Logic"; the third, to lectures on Modern 
Philosophy and to the study of McDougall's "Psychology". 
The object of the course is to familiarize those students who 
possess philosophical interest with the nomenclature and rudi- 
ments of the various philosophical disciplines, so that they will 
be thoroughly conversant with these when they reach college 
or the university. 



55 



PRIZES 



The following prizes are offered annually for proficiency in 
the work of the several departments: 

IN ENGLISH 

The Draper Prizes for Selected Declamations, founded in 1866 
by the late Warren F. Draper, of the class of 1843, of Andover. 
Prizes of twenty-five dollars and of fifteen dollars are awarded. 
The competition is open to all students. A preliminary trial 
before a committee is held early in May, the final competitors 
being chosen on the basis of the best rendered selections. 
The fifty-fourth competition occurred June 14, 1920. 

The Means Prizes for Original Declamations , founded in 1867 
by the late William G. Means, of Boston. Prizes of twenty 
dollars, of twelve dollars, and of eight dollars are awarded. 
Students in any class may compete. Eight are selected for the 
final competition by the judges who later act as a committee 
of award, the prizes being given on the merits of both composi- 
tion and delivery. The fifty-third competition was held April 
30, 1920. 

The Robinson Prizes for Debate, founded in 1896 by the late 
H. S. Robinson, of Andover, are open to three members of the 
Philomathean debating society and a team chosen from the 
school. A prize of thirty dollars is awarded to the representa- 
tives presenting the better argument, irrespective of the merits 
of the question. The twenty-fourth competition occurred May 
19, 1920. 

The Andrew Potter Prizes, sustained since 1904 by James 
Tracy Potter, of the class of 1890, in memory of his father and 
brother. Two prizes of thirty dollars and twenty dollars 

56 



respectively are offered to those members of the graduating 
class who shall deliver, at the Commencement exercises in June, 
the best essays on assigned subjects. The competition is open 
to Seniors. The seventeenth competition was held June 16, 
1920. 

The Schweppe Prizes, sustained by Charles H. Schweppe of 
the class of 1898. Two prizes, one of thirty dollars and one of 
twenty dollars, are awarded for excellence in English, and are 
open to members of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. The 
ninth competition occurred in June, 1920. 

The Goodhue English Prizes, established in 1916 by the family 
of the late Francis A. Goodhue of Andover, in memory of his 
devotion to Phillips Academy. Two prizes are offered, one of 
fifteen dollars and one of ten dollars, for excellence in English 
literature and composition, including the more practical topics 
of elementary rhetoric. The competition is open to members 
of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. 

IN GREEK 

The Joseph Cook Greek Prizes, founded in 1879 by the late 
Joseph Cook, D.D., of the class of 1857. The prizes are fifteen, 
ten, and five dollars respectively. The special topics included 
in the forty-third competition, June, 1922, will be translations 
at sight: 

1. From Homer. 

2. From Attic Greek Prose. 

There will also be questions on Greek literature and antiquities. 

IN LATIN 

The Dove Latin Prizes, sustained from 1880 to 1908 by the 
late George W. W. Dove, of the class of 1853, of Andover, and 
continued by his sons. The prizes of twenty, fifteen, and ten 
dollars are awarded for excellence in Latin and are open to 
Seniors. 



57 



IN THE CLASSICS 



The Valyey Classical Prizes, founded in 1893 by the late Rev. 
Thomas G. Valpey, of the class of 1854. Two prizes of ten 
dollars each are awarded; one for excellence in Latin Composi- 
tion, one for excellence in Greek Composition. The competi- 
tion is open to members of the Upper Middle class. The 
twenty-fifth competition occurred in June, 1920. 

IN MATHEMATICS 

The Convers Mathematical Prizes, founded in 1897 by the late 
E. B. Convers, of the class of 1857, of Englewood, N. J. 
Three prizes of twenty dollars, fifteen dollars, and ten dollars 
are awarded for excellence in the mathematics of the Classical 
Department, to be determined by an examination held in May. 

IN PHYSICS 

The Wadsworth Prize, sustained since 1900 by William S. 
Wadsworth, M.D., of the class of 1887. A prize of ten dollars is 
awarded to that member of the Scientific Department who has 
obtained the highest rank in Physics for the year. 

IN GERMAN 

The Robert Stevenson German Prize, founded in 1904 by Robert 
Stevenson, Jr., of the class of 1896, in memory of his father. A 
prize of twelve dollars is awarded for excellence in German 
Composition. The competition is open to Seniors and Upper 
Middlers of both departments. 

The John Aiken German Prizes, two prizes, one of twenty dol- 
lars and one of ten dollars, are sustained by a member of the 
class of 1873 in memory of John Aiken, a member of the Board 
of Trustees from 1845 to 1863. The competition is open to 
Seniors and Upper Middlers of both departments, and the 
examination, based on which the prizes are awarded, will con- 

58 



tain questions on German geography, a specified period of 
German history, the lives and writings of German authors 
previously assigned, and one or more passages of German prose 
or poetry for translation into English. 

IN FKENCH 

The Frederic Holkins Taylor Prize was founded in 1908 by an 
anonymous friend of the class of 1868. A prize of eight dollars 
is awarded for excellence in French conversation or French 
composition. 

IN AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY 

A prize of twenty-five dollars is awarded annually to that 
member of the class in American Archaeology who maintains 
the highest standing in the course. 

IN CHEMISTRY 

The Dalton Prize in Chemistry, a prize of fifty dollars, founded 
in 1915 by Frederick Goodrich Crane, P. A. 1884, is awarded 
annually to that student maintaining the highest rank in 
Chemistry for the year. 

IN HISTORY 

The George Lauder Prize was founded in memory of George 
Lauder of the class of P. S. 1897. A prize of fifty dollars is 
awarded for excellence in English History. 

FOR ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

The Butler-Thwing Prize, a prize of fifteen dollars, founded 
by Capt. Francis Butler-Thwing of the class of 1908, is 
awarded annually to that member of the Junior class who has 

59 



secured the highest average in his examinations for entrance 
to the Academy. 

FOR HIGH SCHOLARSHIP 

The Faculty Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by San- 
ford H. E. Freund, P. A. 1897, is awarded annually to that mem- 
ber of the graduating class who has attained the highest general 
average in scholarship. 

IN GENERAL EXCELLENCE 

The Fuller Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by Samuel 
Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, is awarded at his graduation to that 
member of the class who has best exemplified and upheld in 
his work and life at Andover the ideals and traditions of Phillips 
Academy. Only those who have been members of the school 
for at least two full academic years are eligible for this prize. 

The Otis Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained by Joseph 
E. Otis, P. A. 1888, and is awarded to that member of the Senior 
class who, having been a member of the school for at least three 
years, has, in the judgment of the Faculty, shown the greatest 
general improvement. 

The Boston Yale Club Cup is awarded annually by the Yale 
Club of Boston to that member of the Senior class who attains 
the highest proficiency in scholarship and athletics. 

The Federation of Harvard Clubs Prize, The New England 
Federation of Harvard Clubs will award at Commencement a set 
of books of some standard author to that member of the Upper 
Middle class who is preparing for college, and whom the Prin- 
cipal, after consultation with the Faculty, shall deem most 
worthy by reason of high scholarship and character. 

A number of prize scholarships are awarded each June. The 
conditions governing these awards may be found on pages 37-39. 



60 



AWARD OF PRIZES, 1919-1920 



The Draper (1) Horace Ford MacMahan, New York, N. Y. 
Prizes (2) Claude Comstock McDonald, St. Joseph, Mo. 



The Means 
Prizes 



(1) Henry Reif Schneider, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(2) Sinley Kong Yuen Chang, Shanghai, China. 

(3) Claude Comstock McDonald, St. Joseph, Mo. 



j,^ e (1) Franklin Muzzy Crosby, Jr., Minneapolis, Minn. 

D l • D • (2) Richard Sigmund Lawton, Chicago, 111. 
Robinson Prizes )' . K . T _ & _ _,. T° ' 

(3) Martin Koon Bovey, Minneapolis, Minn. 

. , ^1 (1) Charles Longford Felske, Kokomo, Ind. 
PHzes (2) Henry Kimba11 Prince ' Short mils > N - J - 

The (1) Henry Reifschneider, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Schweppe Prizes (2) Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr., Rochester, N. Y. 

The (1) Marshall Champion Allaben, Jr., New York, N. Y. 

Goodhue Prizes (2) Henry Reifschneider, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

j,^ e (1) and (2) Divided between Paul Clement Daniels, Albion, N.Y 

Cook Prizes anc * F er ai nan cl Hermann Davis, New York, N. Y. 

(3) John Van Antwerp Fine, Princeton, N. J. 

j,i (1) Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr., Rochester, N. Y. 

Dove Prizes (2) Paul Clement Daniels, Albion, N. Y. 

(3) John Van Antwerp Fine, Princeton, N. J. 

The Latin — John Webster Sanborn, Andover. 

Valpey Prizes Greek — Frederic Melvin Wheelock, Lawrence. 

rh (1) Albert Lincoln Johnson, Jr., Hamburg, N. Y. 

Comers Prizes (2) LyaU MerriU ' Summit > N - 

(3) Donald Broughton Grover, West Newbury. 

WaJmL Prize Paris Fletcher ' Middlebury ' Vt 

The George Kellar Burbridge, New York, N. Y. 

Robert Stevenson Honorable Mention 

German Prize Wilfred Arthur Kemp, Methuen. 

61 



The 
John Aiken 
German Prizes 



(1) Henry Reifschneider, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(2) Stanley de Jongh Osborne, Guatemala City, Guatemala. 



The 

Frederick Holkins Albert Lincoln Johnson, Jr., Hamburg, N. Y. 
Taylor Prize 



A 

Prize in 
American History 



George Davis Andrews, Jr., Chattanooga, Tenn. 



The 

George Lauder George Davis Andrews, Jr., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
History Prize 

The Bolton John Milton Hopkins, Morristown, N. J. 

Chemistry Prize ^ 



The 
Faculty Prize 

The 
Fuller Prize 



Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr., Rochester, N. Y. 
Franklin Muzzy Crosby, Jr., Minneapolis, Minn. 



The 
Otis Prize 



Ira Edward Wight, Jr., St. Louis, Mo. 



The Otto Antonio Alcaide, Brookline. 

Butler-Thwing Honorable Mention 

Prize Bradley Moynan Sawyer, Maiden. 

The 

Boston YaleClub Theodore Lewis Bates, New Haven, Conn. 
Cup 

The New England 

Federation of Frederic Melvin Wheelock, Lawrence. 
Harvard Clubs Prize 



The 



John Milton Hopkins, Morristown, N. J. 



Harvard-Andover Frederic Melvin mee i ock> Law: 
Scholarships 



62 



The James 
Greenleaf Fuller 
Memorial 
Scholarship 



Charles Stafford Gage, Westfield, N. J. 



The 

Henry P. Wright 
Scholarship 



George Chadbourne Taylor, Jr., Pelham, N. Y. 



The Winston 
Trowbridge 
Townsend 
Scholarship 



Paul Clement Daniels, Buffalo, N. Y. 



The 

Howard W. Beat 
Memorial 
Scholarship 



Harry Alexander MacDonald, Andover. 



The Robert Henry 
Coleman Memorial 
Scholarship 



Richard Strong Foxwell, Camden, Maine. 



The George Webster 
Otis Scholarship 



Magnus Christian Hansen, Vejle, Denmark. 



The 
George Xavier 
McLanahan 
Scholarship 



Divided between 
John Webster Sanborn, Andover. 
Randolph Hight Perry, Andover. 



The Gordon 
Ferguson Allen 
Memorial 
Scholarship 



Orin Kelsey Cox, Watertown, Conn. 



63 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS, 1919-1920 



HONORS OF THE FIRST GRADE 



Awarded to those who have no grade lower than 82 and a grade of at least 92 
in half the number of hours. 



Seniors — 

P. C. Daniels 2 terms P. Fletcher 

W. C. Downing, Jr. 1 term C. S. Lunt, Jr. 

C. L. Felske 2 terms E. W. Reynolds 



1 term 
3 terms 
3 terms 



Upper Middlers — 

J. W. Sanborn 2 terms 



HONORS OF THE SECOND GRADE 



Awarded to those who have an average of 85 and no grade lower than 72. 



Seniors — 

G. D. Andrews, Jr. 2 terms 

T. L. Bates 1 term 

W. M. Bernardin 1 term 

J. G. Coleman 1 term 

R. B. Colgate 1 term 

W. C. Downing, Jr. 1 term 

C. L. Felske 1 term 

J. V. A. Fine 3 terms 



P. Fletcher 2 terms 

E. J. Hanley 3 terms 

J. M. Hopkins 3 terms 

A. L. Johnson, Jr. 3 terms 

L. C. Keyes 1 term 

H. S. Pole, 2d 1 term 

H. K. Prince 3 terms 

A. S. Renfrew 1 term 



Upper Middlers — 

H. L. Elsbree 3 terms 

R. H. Perry 1 term 

H. Reif Schneider 3 terms 



J. W. Sanborn 1 term 

G. C. Taylor, Jr. 3 terms 

F. M. Wheelock 1 term 



Lower Middlers - 
G. L. Bateman 
P. S. Bauer 
B. C. Cutler 



1 term 
3 terms 
3 terms 
J. B. Turner 



Juniors — 
H. F. Mills 



1 term 



T. DeLuca 
J. Martin 
T. Smitham 
1 term 



1 term 

1 term 

2 terms 



W. H. Norton 



1 term 



64 



SENIOR HONORS 

CLASS OF 1900 



BIBLE 

Franklin Muzzy Crosby. Jr. 

CHEMISTRT 

Edward McVitty Greene. Jr. John Milton Hopkins 

ENGLISH 

Clarence Sumner Lunt. Jr. Ellwood Webster Reynolds 

FRENCH, ELEMENTARY 

Charles Longford Felske Paris Fletcher 

Ellwood Webster Reynolds 

FRENCH, ADVANCED 

Dana Parker Bent Albert Lincoln Johnson. Jr. 

William Chappell Downing, Jr. Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr. 

Henry Stier Pole, id 

GERMAN", ELEMENTARY 

Lowell Rutherford Comfort Ellwood Webster Reynolds 

GREEK, ADVANCED 

Paul Clement Daniels John Van Antwerp Fine 

GREEK TESTAMENT 

Henry Kimball Prince 

HISTORY, ANCIENT 

John Van Antwerp Fine 

LATIN 

Paul Clement Daniels John Van Antwerp Fine 

Charles Longford Felske Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr. 

Norman Abram Stahl 

MATHEMATICS, ADVANCED ALGEBRA 

Charles Longford Felske Henry Ledyard, Jr. 

MATH EMA TICS, SOLID GEOMETRY 

William Chappell Downing. Jr. Richard Lamborn 

Edward James Hanley Henry Kimball Prince 

Albert Lincoln Johnson, Jr. Alan Spaulding Renfrew 

Ellwood Webster Reynolds 



60 



MATHEMATICS, TRIGONOMETRY 

William Chappell Downing, Jr. John Milton Hopkins 

Charles Longford Felske Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr. 

Paris Fletcher Ellwood Webster Reynolds 
Frank Herman Riegel 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Asa White Kenney Billings, Jr. William Chappell Downing, Jr. 

MUSIC 

Henry Kimball Prince 

PHYSICS 

Paul Clement Daniels Paris Fletcher 

Samuel James Elder Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr. 



Marshall Champion Allaben, Jr. John Guion Coleman 

Theodore Lewis Bates Paul Clement Daniels 

Ellwood Webster Reynolds 



CUM LAUDE 

Theodore Lewis Bates John Milton Hopkins 

John Guion Coleman Albert Lincoln Johnson, Jr. 

Paul Clement Daniels Langley Carleton Keyes 

W r illiam Chappell Downing, Jr. Clarence Sumner Lunt, Jr. 

Charles Longford Felske Henry Stier Pole, 2d 

John Van Antwerp Fine Henry Kimball Prince 

Paris Fletcher Ellwood Webster Reynolds 

Edward James Hanley Norman Abram Stahl 

These members of the class of 1920 were elected to membership in the Cum 
Laude Society on the basis of their superior scholarship in all subjects for their 
Senior year. 

This society aims to bestow that recognition upon high scholarship in the pre- 
paratory schools which the Phi Beta Kappa Society gives to it in the colleges. 



06 



CLASS OF 1920 



The following students, members of the class of 1920 unless otherwise indi- 
cated, have entered college. 

Amherst — Lyall Merrill, John Tuller Royse, George Stewart Sanders. 

Beloit College — David Blodgett Holmes (ex-1921). 

Bowdoin College — Frank Harwood Sellman (1922), Joseph Thomas 
Small (1921). 

Colgate — Cecil Phillip Bordages (ex-1921), Horace Ford MacMahan (ex- 
1921). 

Boston University — Herbert Clarence Rich. 

Columbia University — Otto Von Stockhausen Whitelock. 

Cornell — John Morrissey Paul Anderson (ex-1920), Charles Longford 
Felske, Kenneth Weale Marks (ex-1921), James Richard Patten, Willard Mar- 
shall Law Robinson (1921). 

Dartmouth — Dana Parker Bent, Wentworth Putnam Blodgett, Howard 
Mason Booth (ex-1921), Eliot Gordon Hall, Otis Goodwin Jackson (1922), 
Samuel Abbott Lamson, Sumner Jennings Robinson (1921), George Morrow 
Stevens, 3d. 

Harvard — Gordon Ernest Atwood, James Todd Baldwin, John Leonard 
Becker, Grosvenor Bemis, Marshall Grant Bolster, Bradford Hinckley Burn- 
ham, Ralph de Someri Childs, Robert Morrill Clough (ex-1920), Alexander 
Watters Dole, James Francis D'Wolf, William Alexander Gordon, 3d, Herbert 
Wells Hill (1919), John Milton Hopkins, John Denison Jameson, Langley Carle- 
ton Keyes, Howard Clay Knapp, Richard Sigmund Lawton, Birdsall Thomas 
Manning, Harold Beecher Noyes, Alfred White Paine, Karl Slade Pfaffmann, 
Henry Kimball Prince, William Morris Rosenbaum, Richard Harvey Sears, 
Norman Abram Stahl, Herbert Jacob Weber, George Burnham W T ells. 

University of Illinois — Robert Elliott McCormick. 

University of Kentucky — Daniel Stuart Morse. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College — Charles Frederick Deuel (ex- 
1921). 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Azel Ames, Jr., Malcolm 
Talbot Anthony (1921), Asa White Kenney Billings, Jr., Lowell Rutherford 
Comfort, Burritt Alden Cushman (1921), Richard Malcolm Dickson (1921) 
Louis Henry Fitch, Jr., Edward James Hanley, Richard Lamborn, Gardner 
Blake MacPherson, Alan Spaulding Renfrew, Ellwood Webster Reynolds, 
Frank Herman Riegel, Charles Norton Thomas (1922), Thomas Worrall Tuttle, 
Shepard Vogelgesang. 



67 



University of Michigan — Moreau Stephen Crosby. 

Middlebury College — Frank Edwin Button (1922), Paris Fletcher. 

Northwestern University — Edward Leonard Mayo (1922). 

University of Paris — James Pollock Kohler, Jr. 

University of Pennsylvania — James Whipple Perry (ex-1920). 

University of Pittsburgh — Henry Wadsworth Butterfield (1921). 

Princeton — Nevett Steele Bartow, Jr., Edgardo Alvarez Correa, Ferdi- 
nand Hermann Davis, Perry Edward Faeth, (1921), Thomas Lyon Fentress, 
Magnus Christian Hansen, John Johns (1921), David Walbridge Kendall, 
George Henry Patterson Lacey, Allan Houston Macdonald, Henry Stier Pole, 
2d, John Hopper Roblin, Kenneth Baker Smith, Harold Lovell Strong (ex-1920). 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute — Francis Wayland Hopkins (1921), 
Conant Manning (ex-1921). 

Wesleyan— Robert William Butler (1921), Warren Clark Heidel (ex-1920). 

Williams — Edward Campion Acheson, Jr., Anthony Brayton, Cornelius 
Thurston Chase, Jr., Hugh Pierrepont Etheridge, George Allan Mason, Jr., John 
Merryweather. 

Yale — Elmer Charles Akerley, Marshall Champion Allaben, Jr., Edwin 
Howard Andrew, George Davis Andrews, Jr., Fred Am, Jr., John Louis Baci- 
galupo, Calvin Page Bartlett, Theodore Lewis Bates, Reginald Cuthbert Batty 
(ex-1921), Winton Mariotte Bernardin, Bradford Boardman, Martin Koon 
Bovey, Charles Griswold Bulkley, George Kellar Burbridge, Denzil Sidney Bush, 
Arnold Guyot, Cameron, Jr. (1919), Allan Russell Carmichael, Marvin Chapin 
Cheney, Robert Bangs Colgate, Franklin Muzzy Crosby, Jr., Paul Clement 
Daniels, Thomas Baxter Danielson (1921), Robert Cooper Davidson, William 
Chappell Downing, Jr., Edward Stephen Duffy, Joseph Cyrille Dupont, Jr., 
Samuel James Elder, Vincent Farnsworth, Jr., Woodward Fellows, Malcolm 
Hovenden Frost, Edward McVitty Greene, Jr., John Gordon Hamilton (1921), 
John Frank Havemeyer (1921), Alan Audley Hilditch, Norman Frederic Hock, 
Frederick Watson Ingham, Derick Algernon January, Albert Lincoln Johnson, 
Jr., Allen Keith, Augustus Canfield Ledyard, Henry Ledyard, Jr., Charles Jo- 
seph Little (ex-1920), Richard Albert Loomis, Joseph Wilson Lucas, Jr., Clar- 
ence Sumner Lunt, Jr., Norman Schoonmaker McGee (ex-1921), William Ar- 
thur Morgan, Jr., Robert Louis Munger (1921), Newell George Neidlinger 
(1921), Raymond Otis (ex-1921), Leonard Woods Parkhurst, Henry Clay Pat- 
terson, Jr. (ex-1920), James Stanton Robbins, Karl Stewart Roberts, Cyril 
Cunningham Ryan (1921), George Ffrost Sawyer (1919), Philip William Scheide 
(ex-1920), Charles Colden Searles, Albert Baisley Sheridan, Arthur Rowland 
Sircom, Milton Steinbach, Kenneth Hooker Stevens (ex-1921), Morris Tyler, 
John Lispenard Underbill, Charles Hiram Upson (1921), Ira Edward Wight, Jr., 
Samuel Albert York, Jr., Charles Willard Young, Jr. 



68 



STUDENTS 

CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT 



CLASS I— SENIORS 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Beck, Henry Abraham 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Betts, Rome Abel 


Summit, N. J. 


Pemberton 5 


Black, George Kelleher 


Laurence 


Bishop 1 


Boland, John James, Jr. 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Miss Park's 


Borg, John Simon 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 16 


Brace, Lloyd DeWitt 


West Neivton 


Phillips 11 


Bright, Robert Douglas 


Sandwich 


Day 27 


Burns, Clarence Joseph 


Dorchester 


49 Summer St. 


Cameron, David Pierre Guyot 


Princeton, N.J. 


Adams 22 


Carpenter, William James 


Salem, Ohio 


Bartlet 30 


Clark, Kempton 


Brookline 


Bishop 8 


Collins, Charles Bingham 


Cortland, N. Y. 


Adams 3 


Conant, Loring 


Dedham 


Eaton 5 


Coon, Carleton Stevens 


Wakefield 


Bancroft 9 


Curtis, Caleb Camp 


Long Beach, Calif. 


Bishop 14 


Cushman, John Gedney 


Montclair, N . J. 


Mr. Chandler's 


Darling, Thomas, Jr. 


Wilkes Barre, Pa. 


Clark 3 


Dorman, Gerald Dale 


Beirut, Syria 


Draper 1 


Drew, Garfield Albee 


East Dedham 


Clark 13 


Duffield, Dickinson Curtis 


South Orange, N. J. 


Bishop 4 


Dwight, William 


Holyoke 


Bartlet 23 


Elsbree, Hugh Langdon 


Preston Hollow, N. '. 


Y. Bancroft 4 


Euston, Alexander 


Scranton, Pa. 


Day 31 


Fairleigh, William Macdonald 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bartlet 20 


Ferris, Walter Rockwood, Jr. 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Day 5 


Fine, John Van Antwerp 


Princeton, N.J. 


Phillips 14 


Flint, Edward Whitney 


Lincoln 


Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Gage, Charles Stafford 


West-field, N. J. 


Abbot 18 


Gleason, John MacArthur 


Manchester, N. H. 


Bartlet 27 


Gratwick, William Henry, Jr. 


Linwood, N. Y. 


Andover 9 


Greene, William Melville Hart 


Denver, Colo. 


Bartlet 26 


Hale, Thomas, 3d 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Day 33 


Hammond, Luther Salem, Jr. 


Winnetka, III. 


Bartlet 8 


Hapgood, Richard Locke 


Cambridge 


Bancroft 9 



69 



NAMES 

Haviland, Roger Brush 
Hayes, Bartlett Harding, Jr. 
Hornbeek, Thomas Molten 
Hudner, Harold Kennedy 
Ives, John Othniel 
Jennings, Lawrence Kirtland 
Jones, David Calhoun 
Knox, John Andrew 
Koehler, Herman Jules, Jr. 
Kohler, John Michael 
Lincoln, Louis Augustus 
Lindley, Alfred Damon 
Ludlam, George P, 2nd 
McGregor, Gordon 
Machold, Earle John 
Mengel, Edwin Potter 
Merrill, Oliver Boutwell, Jr, 
Page, Gilman Gray 
Palmer, Frederic Courtland 
Parker, Allen Russell, Jr. 
Parnall, William Edward 
Pearson, Alfred Kittredge 
Perry, Randolph Hight 
Preston, Alexander Pearson 
Randall, Stuart Percy 
Reiner, Richard 
Robbins, Charles Henry Darlinton, 
Rosenberg, Sidney Isaac Myer 
Rosenbloom, Arthur Maurice 
Ross, Hiram Goodrich 
Russell, Donald 
Sanders, Morris Bernard, Jr. 
Sheaffer, Theodore Campbell 
Sherrill, Arthur Miles 
Skillin, Edward Simeon, Jr. 
Small, Frederick Trimble 
Smith, Judson Penfield 
Spock, Benjamin McLane 
Stevenson, Donald Day 
Stevenson, Theodore Dwight 
Stillman, Charles Latimer 
Sullivan, John Joseph, Jr. 
Taylor, George Chadbourne, Jr. 
Thornton, Oliver Cromwell 
Thorpe, James Ruggles 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Glover sville, N. Y. 


Day 34 


Andover 


Phillips St 


Catasauqua, Pa. 


Taylor 8 


Fall River 


Day 8 


Meriden, Conn. 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Fairfield, Conn. 


Bishop 14 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Phillips 2 


New Canaan, Conn. 


Phillips 15 


East Orange, N. J. 


Abbot 15 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 36 


Mansfield 


Abbot 5 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Phillips 13 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 2 


Haverhill 


Abbot 16 


Ellisburg, N. Y. 


Clark 14 


Louisville, Ky. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Summit, N . J. 


Pemberton 5 


Madison, Wis. 


Taylor 23 


New London, Conn. 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Wellesley Hills 


Bartlet 16 


Ann Arbor, Mich. 


Eaton 4 


Gardner 


Phillips 10 


Andover 


70 Elm St. 


Middletown, N. Y. 


Bishop 2 


Holyoke 


Pemberton 3 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Day 17 


Forest Hills, L. I.,N. Y. Bartlet 4 


New York, N. Y. 


Miss Carter's 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Day 23 


Sioux Falls, S. D. 


Phillips 19 


Mercer, Pa. 


Bartlet 17 


Little Rock, Ark. 


Eaton 1 


Wayne, Pa. 


Pemberton 1 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Bishop 22 


Glen Ridge, N. J. 


Taylor 2 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Clark 8 


Williamstown 


Taylor 5 


New Haven, Conn. 


Day 2 


Princeton, N . J. 


Bartlet 3 


Princeton, N . J. 


Bartlet 3 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 2 


Fall River 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Pelham, N. Y. 


Bartlet 1 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Miss Park's 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Draper 6 



70 



NAMES 


t> tp ci t ti it /~* tr* a 


KC/vJiVlo 


Van Wyck, George Lee 


Belmont 


Day 28 


Walker, Basil 


Oberlin, Ohio 


Bishop 28 


Walworth, Arthur Clarence, 3rd 


Newton Centre 


Taylor 24 


Weed, Alonzo Rogers, Jr. 


AT i 

Newton 


laylor 24 


Wheelock, Frederic Melvin 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


TT7M1 1 TT A ■ n SI 

Willard, Henry Augustus, 2nd 


W ashington, u. C. 


Bartlet 8 


Wilson, Alfred Mayo 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


.Daruet lo 


Wingate, Roy Wilson, Jr. 


Arlington, N. J. 


Bartlet 12 


Wlnton, John Norton 


M^inneapolis, ^Minn. 


Tll*Q Tfc^T fi 




Seniors — 88 




CLASS II- 


-UPPER MIDDLERS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


A 11 /""^ 1 T>1 T 

Alien, Carlos Lben, Jr. 


Valley City, N. D. 


Pemberton 6 


Blair, Harry Mitchell, Jr. 


Washington, D. C. 


Taylor 23 


X> J TT O 1 Ml 

Brandman, Harry Schiller 


\T ir 7 tit \r 

New York, N. Y. 


Abbot 14 


Brosseau, Louis Pierre 


Santa Barbara, Calx]. 


Day 33 


Bucknam, Gordon 


TTT 77 7 TT *77 

W ellesley Hills 


Taylor 14 


Cameron, JNicholas Guyot 


D_-___f_ AT T 

Princeton, N.J. 


Adams 22 


Castleman, Godwin Munn 


J7T , TT *77 T T 1*7 T7 

forest Hills, L.I.,N.Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


Chang, Sinley Hong Yuen 


Peking, China 


Abbot 4 


Clark, Herbert Sherman, Jr. 


Holyoke 


Bishop 31 


r~y lii mi j T 

Crockett, Iheodore Lyman 


Brandon, Vt. 


Adams 2 


Crosby, Henry Stetson 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet 28 


/~1 -1 ri l 1 1 XT 1 X 

Curlee, bhelby Hammond, Jr. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Bishop 35 


Gushing, William Harvey 


Brookline 


Taylor 19 


Daley, Leo Francis 


Andover 


14 Bartlet St. 


DeLuca, Theodore 


Andover 


Clement 10 


Doggett, Walton Porter 


J? ~j. T\ J? 

East Vedliam 


Adams 9 


Dorman, Harry Gaylord, Jr. 


Beirut, Syria 


Draper 1 


TV • T TT 

Durgm, James Henry 


Bradford 


Bishop 21 


T]V i l x I 1*1 o 1 

ritchen, John Frederick, 3d 


Albany, N. Y. 


Tucker 1 


Forrest, William Sylvester, Jr. 


Highland Park, III. 


Farrar 5 


Frenyear, John Thomas 


Say brook, Conn. 


Taylor 10 


TT ii r^i'ii ~% /r !■ 

Hobbs, Stillman Moulton 


Hampton, N. H. 


Clark 16 


TT T \tt«ii • xi t 

Hobson, William Langhorne, Jr. 


Rockville Centre, L.I., N. Y. Andover 2 


TT 11 1 TT 11 A 1 

Hoibrook, Harold Ahrens 


Newton Centre 


Clement 13 


TT TT T, 1 1 1 

Howe, Henry b or bush 


Cohasset 


Bancroft 6 


TT 1 1 T* "1 1 T*» 

Husband, Richard Borgman 


Hanover, N. H. 


Hardy 4 


TT t 1 

Huttig, John 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Day 16 


Krech, Gerald 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Lackey, Frank Danby, Jr. 


Claymont, Del. 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Lewis, Whitney Connor 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Abbot 16 



71 



NAM ICS 


KliiSlUKNCES 


ROOMS 


Lund, Joseph Wheelock, 2nd 


Boston 


Bancroft 15 


Mack, Edward Clarence 


New York, N. Y. 


Churchill 2 


Manson, Grant Carpenter 


Detroit, Mich. 


Miss Cheever's 


Martin, James 


Newtonville 


Bartlet 17 


Monroe, John Hill 


Brookline 


Taylor 9 


Morrison, Clarence Edwin, Jr. 


Lawrence 


Phillips 18 


Multer, Smith Lewis, Jr. 


£/asi Orange, N.J. 


Clark 5 


Pierce, Ross Edwards 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Bancroft 15 


Riggs, George Overton 


Camp Travis, Texas 


Taylor 25 


Riley, William Alton 


North Attleboro Mrs. Wainwright's 


T> # 1 TT7*11 # /~W 1 

Riley, William Charles 


Bristol, Conn. 


Day 29 


T"fc T\ 1 i T"> , , 

Ross, Donald Jb assette 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Pemberton 3 


Sargent, Paul Brainerd 


Winchester 


.Bishop 18 


Sherman, Edgar Jay, 2d 


JVinchester 


.oartiet *o 


Ol •!! T • , "IT 1 

Shemll, Leicester Haydon 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Clement 11 


Silver, Henry Mann 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 3 


Smitham, Thomas 


Mauch Chunk, Pa. 


Bancroft 3 


Stern, Jesse Myron 


Chestnut Hill 


Adams 11 


T7 Ml /""II 1 T* 1 TT 1 

Vaill, Charles Beecher Holmes 


Winsted, Conn. 


Taylor 26 


Walker, Donald Kimball 


Lynn 


Andover 6 


TXT 11 T* 1 • TTTMr 

Wallace, Frederic William 


Plainfield, N. J. 


Taylor 18 


Wells, Frederick Chapin 


Chicago, III. 


Day 14 


Willard, Charles Hastings 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet. 28 


Witwer, Mohler Studebaker 


South Bend, Ind. 


Eaton 6 


V^ood, Cornelius Van Ness 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Bartlet 25 


Wright, Cyrus Gordon 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bishop 11 


Upper 


MlDDLERS 56 





CLASS III— LOWER MlDDLERS 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Asher, Frank Lewis 


Brookline 


Taylor 27 


Bernheim, Frederick 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 12 


Bigelow, Victor Stoddard 


Andover 


7 Locke St. 


Blunt, William Williams, Jr. 


Port Huron, Mich. 


Farrar 5 


Brayton, Lawton Slade 


Fall River 


Andover 1 


Bruce, James Gould 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Tucker 2 


Buttrick, Allan Winfield 


Andover 


15 Wolcott Ave. 


Case, George Bowen, Jr. 


Englewood, N. J. 


Bartlet 29 


Cleaveland, Fred Maurice, Jr. 


Melrose 


Pease 9 


Clough, Charles Asa, Jr. 


Vineyard Haven 


Day 24 


Epler, Palmer York 


Methuen 


Phillips 9 


Gordon, Alexander Dorward 


Hazardville, Conn. 


Hardy 1 


Heath, Ellis Kendrick 


Worcester 


Bishop 2 



72 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Holt, Reginald Woodbury 


Andover 


74 Bartlet St. 


Jensen, Arthur Eugene 


Gloucester 


Bishop 22 


Johnson, John Crittenden 


Hamburg, N. Y. 


Andover 4 


Jones, William Barksdale, Jr. 


Vaughan, Miss. 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Little, Joseph Simpson 


West Nutley, N. J. 


Bancroft 4 


Lord, John Anderson, Jr. 


Danvers 


Mr. Tower's 


McNeer, Gordon Palmer 


Seward, Alaska 


Taylor 3 


Merrill, Frederick Thayer 


Brookline 


Pease 10 


Moody, Howard Hartwell 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Mr. Stott's 


Murphy, Charles Barney Gould 


Durham, N. H. 


Adams 8 


Newman, Frank Watson 


Tunkhannock, Pa. 


Adams 16 


Newman, Fred Otis 


Tunkhannock, Pa. 


Adams 16 


Posey, Marshall Lyne 


South Orange, N. J. 


Adams 20 


Remington, Harry George 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Adams 4 


Renouf, Henry Charles 


Andover 


140 Elm St. 


Rice, Edward Archibald 


Woburn 


Pemberton 2 


Rogers, John 


Kennebunk, Me. 


Bishop 21 


Shepperd, Walter Clinton 


Mount Vernon, N . Y. 


Adams 9 


Smith, Russell Train 


Concord 


Adams 17 


Strickland, William Alexander 


Lawrence 


Phillips 6 


Taylor, John D'Auby Higgins 


New York, N. Y. 


Clement 8 


Treadway, Charles Terry, Jr. 


Bristol, Conn. 


Day 29 


Trevvett, Walter Egan 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Adams 19 


Turner, Benner Creswill 


Columbus, Ga. 


Abbot 9 


Vose, Edward Rich 


Last Lddington,Me. 


Day 10 


Wasserman, Milton 


New York, N. Y. 


Pemberton 1 


Watson, Louis Henry 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 17 


Lower Middlers — 40 




CLASS IV 


-JUNIORS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Allen, George Lockhart 


Manchester 


Williams Hall 


Barnes, Clarence Alfred, Jr. 


Mansfield 


Williams Hall 


Barnes, Melvin Bunker 


Andover Sunset Rock Road 


Basham, Harvey Alonzo, Jr. 


Shawnee, Okla. 


12 Florence St. 


Bastedo, Norrie Philip 


New York, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Bixler, Paul Edwin 


Lencoes, Bahia, Brazil 


Clark 4 


Blair, Clifford Frederick 


South Weymouth 


Taylor 3 


Blanchard, Albert Cook 


Bangor, Me. 


Mrs. Holt's 


Bliss, Charles Lydston 


Newburyport 


Draper 5 


Blunt, Charles Nash 


Port Huron, Mich. 


Williams Hall 


Bodwell, Henry Arnold 


Andover 


31 Morton St. 


Boles, Charles Edward 


Brookline 


Tucker 3 



73 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Booth, Albert Washington 


Methuen 


Methuen 


Bouma, Gysbert K 


Pater son, N.J. 


Woods 7 


Bryant, Robert Bancroft, 


Gardner 


Williams Hall 


Bunting, Robert Loring 


Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 


Tucker 5 


Burton, Malcolm King 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Clement 9 


Burton, Myron Simmons 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Andover 3 


Card, Joseph Phelps 


Highland Park, III. 


Mr. Tower's 


Carter, Richard Augustine, Jr. 


Lawrence 


Clark 17 


Case, John McDougall 


Bronxville, N. Y. 


Tucker 1 


Christie, Harry Francis 


Lawrence 


Mrs. Hill's 


Colquhoun, Gordon Lee 


Andover 


38 Chestnut St. 


Conner, Eli Taylor, 3d 


Rydal, Pa. 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Cook, Thomas Harold 


Toledo, Ohio 


Bishop 8 


Cornish, Charles Hubbard 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Mr. Stott's 


Curtis, William Pitkin 


Newton Centre 


Adams 23 


Danforth, Nicholas Williamson 


Summit, N. J. 


Farrar 4 


Davison, Thurlow Weed 


New York, N. Y. 


Woods 6 


Dickerman, William Carter, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Dolman, John Elbert, Jr. 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 33 


Dunsford, Harold 


Chelmsford 


Adams 4 


Edson, Edward Gilroy, Jr. 


Beaumont, Texas 


Williams Hall 


Eldridge, Harold Norton, Jr. 


Northport, L. I., N. Y. 


Woods 5 


Elwell, Paul Kenneth 


Gloucester Mrs. Wainwright's 


Escamilla, Manuel 


Manila, P. 1. 


Taylor 22 


Flanders, Kenneth Goldsmith 


Winchester 


Williams Hall 


Flynn, Grant Yetman 


Marianao, Cuba 


Mrs. Gardner's 


Flynn, John Doyle 


Fall River 


Day 8 


Foster, Edward Harris 


Andover 


Lupine Road 


Fox, Douglas Claughton 


Plandome, L. I., N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Gilchrist, John Douglas Newall 


Saginaw, Mich. 


Taylor 12 


Glazier, Prentiss Cummings 


Greenwich, Conn. 


W r illiams Hall 


Grebey, George Frederick 


New Haven, Conn. 


Clark 4 


Grinnell, Richard Clark 


Mount Vernon, N. Y. 


Day 21 


Haight, Eric Hall 


Muskegon, Mich. 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Hamilton, Robert Chandler 


East Orange, N. J. 


Williams Hall 


Hart, Kenneth Joseph 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Mr. Tower's 


Henry, Stuart Compton 


Andover 


29 Central St. 


Hicks, Leslie Robert, Jr. 


Melrose Highlands 


Pease 12 


Hogg, George Ewing 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Mr. Chandler's 


Hogue, Oliver Driscoll, Jr. 


Brookline 


Woods 6 


Howarth, Francis George 


Oxford 


Adams 5 


Keany, Matthew 


Andover 


32 Morton St. 


Kohler, Carl James 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 35 


Layton, Robert Reese, Jr. 


Bridgeville, Del. 


Adams 21 


Lee, Tsu Yung 


Peking, China 


Adams 5 



74 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Look, King 


Hongkong, China 


Churchill 3 


McKinlav, Robert Emmons 


Yonkers, N. Y . 


Farrar 4 


]VXahrt, Armin 


Dayton, Ohio 


Clark 15 


Maxson, Albert Freeman 


Schenectady, N . Y . 


Phillips 20 


Miller, Richard Dunbar 


Racine, Wis. 


Williams Hall 


Nichols, Monroe Kimball 


Andover 


41 School St. 


Onthank, Curtis Heath 


Fitchburg 


Mr. Stott's 


Owl, Frel McDonald 


Cherokee, N. C. 


Bishop 3 


Parker, Edward Linne 


San Francisco, Calif. 


Miss Park's 


Paxton, Worthen 


Washington, Pa. 


Tucker 1 


Peabody, Alfred Horatio Belo 


Cambridge 


Williams Hall 


Pearce, Eugene Lovick, Jr. 


Clearwater, Fla. 


Williams Hall 


Ransom, Henry Edward MacDonald Gould 






Toronto, Ont., Can. 


Mr. Stott's 


iH-iiiJiai i» niau JL/avxu 


Brookline 


Day 23 




Andover 


140 Elm St. 


T?r»«pnV>mim T,m«niipl T^rnnlr .Tr 

J. A 1 1 ' Jll LAI I L. J_J J — 1 — L ullUn X 1 Chi 1 l\ , *J A . 


New York, N. Y. 


Mr. Tower's 


T?r»«:<;i TTpnrv 

llUiTillj A JLA_. AA_A y 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 




Bogota, Colombia, S. A. 


Adams 7 


SnnVinTTi f-ipnrcrp TCnicrht 

tJaiiUUlilj VJ CU1 gc la UIcU L 


Andover 


5 Locke St. 


SfinfnrH CVinrlp<! TTam lltnn .Tr 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Snwvpr ("'VinrlpQ TTpnrv 

Ajd »i v ci j viiai ico 1A.C1U > 


Andover 210 South Main St. 


mnplrlnn .Tr»pl ("Vjnlr 

k .> AAA^ A j wvCl VltXAJV 


Columbia, Tenn. 


Williams Hall 


Skinner, Morris Phillips 


Madison, N. J. 


Mr. Tower's 


Sin crip TJnv T^rl wnrrl 

.' 1 CA i-j A V j 11UV T> CLL \X 


Lima, Ohio 


Adams 10 


Smith, Joseph Harold 


Andover South Main St. 


Smith ~K"pith Tr 

OXXlitll, XVCltll, til* 


Linwood, Utah 


Williams Hall 


Stebbins Edwin Allen Jr. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Stillman, Leland Stanford, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 10 


Stillman, Ralph Seymour 


Troy, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Stone, Knowlton Davies 


Andover 


1 Locke St. 


Tait, Arthur Fitz William 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Clement 1 


Thompson, Elmer Gildersleeve 


Manhasset, L. I., N. Y. 


Adams 2 


Toner, Williams McCulloch 


Anderson, Ind. 


Clark 14 


Treat, Franklin Graves 


Winchester 


Williams Hall 


Tutein, Richard Allen 


Winchester 


Williams Hall 


Tweedy, Robert Bruce 


Winona, Minn. 


Williams Hall 


Vanderschmidt, George Frederick, Jr. 


Leavenworth, Kan. 


Williams Hall 


Wadhams, William Henderson, Jr. 


New York, N. Y 


Williams Hall 


Walker, Stoughton 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Adams 21 


Ward, Thomas, 2d 


Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 


Taylor 25 


Watson, Charles, 3d 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Clark 3 


Whitham, John Garnett 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Wineman, Joseph Marx 


Chicago, III. 


Woods 8 


Wingate, Frank Poucher 


Arlington, N. J. 


Mr. Johnson's 



75 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Winters, Rand Eddy 


Bay City, Mich. 


Churchill 5 


Wright, Ansel Duryea 


New York, N. Y. 


Clement 6 


Yerxa, Herbert Lenk 


Whitneyville, Conn. 


Mrs. Hill's 


Juniors — 104 




SCIENTIFIC 


DEPARTMENT 


CLASS A— SENIORS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Annis, Perley Mason 


Stoneham Mrs. McCurdy's 


Askew, Ralph Kirk, Jr. 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Phillips 3 


Atha, Henry George 


Groton, Conn. 


Taylor 10 


Bacon, John Kenly 


Newton 


Phillips 12 


Bateman, Glen Latrobe 


Johannesburg, So. Africa Bartlet 19 


Bates, George Warren 


Cohasset 


Bancroft 6 


Booth, Theodore Harrington 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Clark 2 


Brewster, James Rollins 


Andover 


8 Judson Road 


Bunting, James Ernest, Jr. 


Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 


Bartlet 25 


Burns, James Ferguson, Jr. 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 


Bartlet 7 


Butler, Richard Albert 


Brookline 


Phillips 9 


Carlton, Edward Whitlock 


Andover 


67 Central St. 


Clark, Alexander Bierce, Jr. 


Canton, Ohio 


Bartlet 12 


Clarke, Samuel Montague 


Southbridge 


Bishop 5 


Cleveland, Edwin Clarence 


Webster 


Phillips 19 


Cornell, Joseph I 


Bay side, L. I., N. Y. 


Abbot 8 


Coykendall, John Eastland 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Bancroft 7 


Damon, Russell Lawrence 


Cranford, N. J. 


Bancroft 12 


Davenport, Howard Hettinger, Jr. 


Somerville 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Devine, Graham 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Andover 1 


Dillaway, Newton Learnard 


Reading 


Clark 12 


Donaldson, Robert Douglas, Jr. 


Lincoln 


Miss Carter's 


Draper, Lenard Ames 


Duluth, Minn. 


Bartlet 13 


Dudley, Paul Harwood 


Caldwell, Idaho 


Bishop 28 


Eiseman, Philip 


Boston 


Adams 24 


Evans, Thomas 


East Moriches, L. I., N. Y. Phillips 4 


Ferguson, Oliver Drayton 


Paducah, Ky. 


Abbot 7 


Ferguson, Robert Robertson 


Paducah, Ky. 


Abbot 7 


Goodspeed, Walter Stuart 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Day 12 


Greene, Franklin Irvine 


Denver, Colo. 


Bartlet 26 


Griffith, Richard Gordon 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Eaton 6 


Hardenbergh, Albert Henry 


Middletown, N. Y. 


Taylor 15 


Hardy, Frederick Knowlton 


West Newton 


Day 1 



76 



RESIDENCES 



ROOMS 



Hatch, Everett Franklin 
Helling, Joseph, 2nd 
Henderson, Malcolm Colby 
Hibbard, Frederick William 
Hogg, William Cecil 
Janeway, Jacob Jones 
Keith, Glen William 
Kemp, Wilfred Arthur 
Kloman, Francis Ray 
Kohler, Walter J, Jr. 
Leach, Donald Wallace 
Loveman, Adolph Bernard 
McClure, Robert Proctor 
Mclnnes, Duncan 
Mansfield, Norman Lathrop 
Mathews, Frank Pelletreau 
Meredith, Spencer Barrett 
Mitchell, Ronald Alexander 
Newman, William Mendell 
Newton, John Howard 
Nicola, Oliver Peter, Jr. 
O'Donnell, Francis Fay 
Osborne, Stanley deJongh 
Ramsey, John Patterson, Jr. 
Ranger, Casper, 2d 
Reed, Dana Leslie 

Richardson, Thomas Peter deQuartel 

Rogers, James Waller 

Sahler, Carl Philip 

Sanborn, John Webster 

Serat, William Seth 

Shepard, John Sanford, Jr. 

Snow, Howard 

Stearns, Roger Vinton 

Stevenson, Robert, 3d 

Stilwell, Neil Conwell 

Stout, Allison Barnard 

Sun, Arthur Kwang I 

Thomson, Stanley McDowell 

Tillson, Saxby Merle 

Trasel, Edward George, Jr. 

Van Patten, William James 

Veghte, Walter Edgar 

Wade, Henry Sweetser 

Weinberg, Charles Morris 



Andover 8 Florence St. 

Plymouth Phillips 20 

New Haven, Conn. Day 32 

Lawrence Day 21 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Phillips 7 

New York, N. Y. Mr. Chandler's 

Claremore, Okla. Draper 2 

Methuen Day 9 

New York, N. Y. Bancroft 7 

Sheboygan, Wis. Day 13 

Middletown, Conn. Pemberton 6 

Birmingham, Ala. Taylor 16 

Syracuse, N. Y. Eaton 1 

Bath, Me. Bishop 21 

Hillsboro, N. H. Bishop 23 

New York, N. Y. Eaton 3 

Hartford, Conn. Mr. Chandler's 

Stafford Springs, Conn. Day 20 

Pierce City, Mo. Bishop 24 

Foxboro Miss Cheever's 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Miss Cheever's 

Lowell Taylor 9 
Guatemala City, Guatemala Andover 5 

Charlotte, Vt. ' Day 6 

Holyoke Miss Cheever's 

Andover Day 22 

Germantown, Pa. Bartlet 18 

Chicago, III. Miss Cheever's 

Harlingen, N. J. Pemberton 2 

Andover 5 Locke Street 

Kansas City, Mo. Abbot 6 

Franklin, N. H. Bishop 20 

Yonkers, N. Y. Bishop 8 

Dunkirk, N. Y. Bartlet 24 

Winnetka, 111. Draper 3 

Anderson, Ind. Miss Park's 

Chicago, III. Phillips 21 

Tientsin, China Dr. Stearns's 

Toronto, Ont., Can. Mr. Johnson's 

Fall River Day 3 

Philadelphia, Pa. Phillips 12 

New York, N. Y. Phillips 9 

Newark, N. J. Phillips 8 

Alton, III. Clark 11 

Greenville, Miss. Bishop 26 



77 



NAMES 

Wight, Daniel Ewing 
Williams, David Payson 
Worthington, Arthur Morton, Jr. 
Wraith, William, Jr. 
Wright, Thomas Clarke 
York, Gordon Follette 



RESIDENCES ROOMS 

St. Louis, Mo. Phillips 2 

Sharon, Pa. Phillips 1 
Dedham Mrs. McCurdy's 

New York, N. Y. Phillips 8 

Minneapolis, Minn. Bishop 34 

Cleveland, Ohio Bartlet 18 
3—84 



CLASS B— UPPER MIDDLERS 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Allen, Daniel 


Cheshire, Conn. 


Bishop 3 


Allen, Robert Gray 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Clark 12 


Atwood, George Baker 


Ferguson, Mo. 


Bishop 25 


Babbitt, Howard Carter 


Honolulu, H. T. 


Bishop 7 


Babson, George Jay, Jr. 


Leesburg, Va. 


Andover 6 


Bailey, Morton Stevens 


Hillsboro, N. H. 


Day 22 


Batchelder, Roger Walker 


North Reading 


Clark 16 


Bauer, Paul Sherman 


Lynn 


Clement 2 


Beck, Beresford Ellsworth 


Evanston, III. 


Clark 2 


Bennett, Meridan Hunt 


Minneapolis, Minn. Phillips 13 


Bradeen, Charles Shaw 


Essex, Conn. 


Tucker 3 


Brainard, Ira Fitch, 2d 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Bartlet 7 


Brown, Richard Hunt 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Buzzell, Roger Gilbreth 


East Orange, N . J. 


Bishop 4 


Carr, Donald Eaton 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 4 


Carter, Richard Phillip 


Andover 


121 High Plain Rd. 


Cassody, John B 


Madison, Wis. 


Mr. Chandler's 


Chadwick, Harrison 


Winchester 


Hardy 2 


Chapman, Horatio Campbell 


Saybrook, Conn. 


Bartlet 14 


Cheney, Stanley 


Brookline 


Taylor 6 


Chien, Chang Kan 


Peking, China 


Taylor 4 


Chu, Wellington Wen Lung 


Tientsin, China 


Taylor 9 


Cole, Horace Wellington 


West Newton 


Abbot 6 


Cotter, Augustine Joseph 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Creevey, Kennedy 


New York, N. Y. 


Pease 10 


Crosby, Warren Melville 


Topeka, Kan. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Cutler, Benjamin Crawford 


Andover 


Phillips 1 


Danforth, George Henry, 3d 


Summit, N. J. 


Andover 9 


Deignan, John Eugene 


East Orange, N. J. 


Taylor 23 


Dunlap, Harold Charles 


Eaton, Ohio 


Day 18 


Dyer, George Bell 


New York, N. Y. 


Eaton 5 


Earling, Howard Garrigues 


Moorestown, N. J. 


Clark 10 


Ellis, Herbert 


Brookline 


Mrs. Hill's 



78 



NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Elwell, Richard Derby 


New York, N. Y. 


Bishop 16 


Fabian, Tracy 


New Haven, Conn. 


Bishop 15 


Fang, Pei-Shou 


Peking, China 


Taylor 9 


Fanning, David Greene 


Hingham Centre 


Bartlet 24 


Gaines, Wilbur Leroy 


Meriden, Conn. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Garfield, Owen Richardson 


Rochester, N. H. 


Adams 3 


Gill, Stanley 


Hartland, Vt. 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Goodwill, Francis Ormes 


Jamestown, N. Y. 


Abbot 13 


Grant, Robert Redington 


Troy, Pa. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Gray, Donald McPherson 


Newton Centre 


Eaton 2 


Grover, Donald Broughton 


Petersham 


Phillips 17 


Gulliver, Arthur Conant 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bishop 3 


Halloran, William Francis, Jr. 


Methuen 


Clark 4 


Hammond, Stephen Alexander, Jr. 


Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 




Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Harris, Albert Spear 


New York, N. Y. 


Churchill 6 


Hays, David Douglas 


Johnstown, N. Y. 


Day 27 


Holmes, William Hicks 


Wyoming, N. J. 


Clement 5 


Hunt, Alfred Herbert, Jr. 


Colorado Springs, Colo. Bartlet 10 


Hurtado, Manuel 


Mexico City, Mexico 


i Bishop 8 


Hutt, John Richard 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Miss Park's 


Insley, Francis Henry 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Adams 18 


Itoh, Kenzo 


Osaka, Japan 


Mr. Manning's 


Ives, Stanley Hoyt 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bancroft 5 


Kaufman, Fred William, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. Mr. L. C. Newton's 


Kellogg, Preston Paris 


Glens Falls, N. Y. 


Adams 23 


Kimberly, John Robbins 


Neenah, Wis. 


Day 19 


Lee, Wilmot Brereton 


New York, N. Y. 


Andover 2 


Leisenring, Walter 


Upper Lehigh, Pa. 


Bishop 27 


Look, Allen MacMartin 


Hartford, Conn. 


Eaton 2 


Lord, Phillips Haynes 


Meriden, Conn. 


Abbot 17 


Lull, Raymond Mills 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Taylor 23 


McDonald, Claude Comstock 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Adams 1 


McGrew, Edward Josephus, Jr. 


Lexington, Mo. 


Bishop 13 


MacNeil, Alden Brooks 


College Point, N. Y. 


Bishop 6 


McPherson, John Hoover 


Medford 


Taylor 10 


Mahoney, Charles Daniel 


Lawrence 


Day 26 


Mason, Edward Gay 


Glencoe, III. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Merrick, Lathrop Bennett 


. Andover 


Lowell St. 


Miller, Noel Henry 


Racine, Wis. 


Pease 12 


Moon, James Southworth 


Cranford, N. J. 


Bancroft 12 


Munger, John Dudley 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 11 


Munro, Seymour Sherwood 


Camillus, N. Y. 


Mr. Chandler's 


Onthank, Pierce 


Fitchburg 


Bartlet 11 


Paget, Harold Alan 


New York, N. Y, 


Clement 3 



79 



XT A ura 
NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


*Peirce, Charles Leonard, 3d 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Phillips 13 


Petze, Charles Louis, Jr. 


Wilmington, Del. 


Bishop 27 


TW Ml* TT /~i i» t 

rhilhpps, Henry Godfrey, Jr. 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Clark 14 


Pickering, Hamilton Reeve 


East Orange, N. J. 


Clark 9 


Pickering, Reynale Timothy 


East Orange, N. J. 


Mr. Johnson's 


Preston, Elwyn Greeley, Jr. 


Lexington 


Adams 15 


Preston, Walter Grey, Jr. 


Omaha, Neb. 


Draper 3 


Quarrier, Archie Monroe 


Short Hills, N. J. 


Bartlet 9 


Reed, Joseph Verner 


Denver, Colo. 


Phillips 22 


Rentschler, Walter Anthony 


Hamilton, Ohio 


Phillips 22 


Robertson, Robert Stoddart 


Paducah, Ky. 


Taylor 3 


Rogers, Irving Emerson 


Lawrence 


Day 11 


Rose, Sayre Broadhead 


Glastonbury, Conn. 


Abbot 5 


Sawyer, John Parker 


Lowell 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Sayles, Alexander 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Holt's 


Screven, Franklin Buchanan 


Savannah, Ga. 


Day 8 


Sheppard, Arthur Ronald Barton Oram Hongkong, China 


Day 4 


Simonson, Cortelyou William 


W. New Brighton, N. Y. 






Mrs. Wainwright's 


Smith, Dudley Tenney 


Montclair, N. J. 


Bancroft 15 


Spencer, Donald 


Cambridge 


Phillips 17 


Stevens, Ralph Cuyler, Jr. 


Glen Ridge, N. J. 


Taylor 2 


Strickland, Harold 


Lawrence 


Mrs. Hill's 


Todd, Frederick Porter 


New York, N. Y. 


Eaton 5 


Turner, John Bennett 


Norwich, N. Y. 


Bishop 7 


Walker, James 


East Orange, N. J. 


Mr. Johnson's 


Walworth, William McAlpine 


Lawrence 


Phillips 11 


White, James Mattocks 


Brookline 


Bartlet 18 


Wilmot, Nelson Frank 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Bishop 35 


Wuest, Harold Albert William 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 7 


Wylie, Sidney Hopkins 


Torrington, Conn. 


Taylor 19 


♦Deceased 






Upper Middlers — 107 




CLASS C- 


-LOWER MIDDLERS 




NAMES 


RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Abernathy, James Logan 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Bishop 36 


Adams, John Durrell 


Wellesley Hills 


Bancroft 10 


Aguinaldo, Emilio, Jr. 


Manila, P. I. 


Taylor 28 


Alcaide, Otto Antonio 


Brookline 


Clement 4 


Allen, Richard Bedford 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Clark 13 


Anderson, Robert Palmer 


Noank, Conn. 


Hardy 3 


Avery, Frederic Mercer 


Peoria, III. 


Miss Cheever's 



80 



NAMES 

Baker, William Henry 

Bishop, Stephen Hunter 

Bonney, Orvis Weston 

Booth, Waller Beall, Jr. 

Brown, Gordon Kenneth 

Bull, Benjamin Seth 

Burnham, DeWitt Kinne 

Burr, George Watson 

Capra, Pietro Jerry 

Carlton, Frank Tyler 

Chopitea, Jose I., Jr. 

Clark, Ray Butler 

Cooke, Anson Leonard 

Cookman, Robert Rollen, Jr. 

Cory, John Aumock 

Cox, Orin Kelsey 

Cross, Kent Converse 

Cummings, Leland Wilson 

Daly, Herbert Wallace 

Dove, Percival, Jr. 

Dunkle, Robert Johnston, Jr. 

Dunsford, Bevan 

Emery, Willard, Jr. 

Engstrum, Frederick 

Fairback, Elliot 

Fitzgerald, Gregory Joseph 

Fletcher, George Alfred, 2d 

Flint, Thomas 

Foote, William Jenkins 

Foster, Willard R S 

Foxwell, Richard Strong 

Gay, William Campbell 

Gilchrist, Frank William 

Gordon, Lewis Henderson 

Greene, Roger Denise 

Hall, Jack Lowell 

Hammett, Edward, 3d 

Hammond, Seymour Chamberlain 

Harriman, Lawrence Manning 
Harris, Byron Douglas 
Harris, Herbert Donald 
Heald, William Edward 
Hodges, Richard Burt 
Johnstone, Vanderburgh 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Lynn 


1VJ.JO& V_ycll LCI o 




Ah Vint 1 5 

ilUUUl £%J 


I ill lit* 1VJ.V. 


Ron r*T r^f f 1 *7 


Ciinpn vhnm 


Clark 9 


Keene N 77 


Adams 8 


1 / i >i yi s>/-i Y\n 11 Q ll/f -1 YiYl 
lr£ IflftVlipUllOy lYLlllfl* 


Bnrtlpt 10 


f^PTk'Pl P1I flflltT 
Dty 1 tltslt'y 9 KJ LlvLJ ■ 


Tavlor 21 


ill H 111 1YI P ( Vltl Yl 

KJliL ±jyrrl& 9 \uUftfl* 




V.yi nl Pinnnrt \" -f 
i-J fCyloUsUULL) IV • t/ • 


Clement 12 


A ->? n r\Y\P¥ 
ri flLLUVti 


fi7 Cpntral vSt 


J ,i m n Ppvii 

£jlfflll 9 £ tsl l£ 


lVfr«; TVTrC!nrHv , «i 


New York N Y 


Bartlet 1 


/ fl HYI* PY) PP 
£JU (A/Its f lists 


Phillins fi 


r noiiuury 


PpQ CD I 1 

X CctoC X X 


RmpIIp n J 


Day 16 


WtttBftOWYl CoTltl, 


Taylor 17 


rr IflVflVfULUfl 


XXcLl \£j v 


(InmpniP Pn 

\J\JLI 1 I I i_j ( C y M. IX • 


Day 9 


rfl DPVQIfl P f Pi Yl 11 

£XlU&roLlLt/ 9 XjUtlll* 


Dflv 14i 


A YlflflDPY 

£M- llAjtAJl/C'l 


Highland Road 


Urnnhlirip 

U 1 \J\J rvVv f vK> 


Bartlet 15 


C^hplm sfnrr] 

\y lvi>V IICOJ xJI fJU 


Bishop 16 


TriYi Q'fl pi A 


Abbot 13 


W/ n cni YifrtnYi ft f 
rr uo flirty LUFl 9 £J . 


lvxia. X;cliiUW » 


kj v • xj\J 'i vo • ajj. \j • 


Tavlor 7 


fiiiliifh \f iyiyi 
£Ji£lllLfly Jj£ villi* 


LJtX » 1 V_ 1 1 V 


fi P111PTT ViT/7 Pfl 

££llv 't/l JUrUL) £ LI. 


Willinm** Hall 

TYXllldlXlo Hall 


Boston 


Clark 6 


A7/>-»/i TTnnPYi t riYi yi 
It t/ UJ 11 Hit ft* \_/Uflfl. 


Dav 2 


S\Pn PYiPcfnn 11 rJ w 


Churchill 3 


/ rt YYI fi PYl ll/f P 


XJctXll^lvIl L X* 


Rrnnkhm N Y 

£JlUUitvyfl 9 It 4 £ . 


R ancr oft 16 


£j(i vLrt'Ly 1V£ loo . 


Rop+lpf 20 

XJctI L1C L JJ\J 


Flushing, N. Y . 


Bancroft 16 


Denver, Colo. 


Day 14 


Westfield Mr. L. C. Newton's 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 35 


Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 




Miss Hinchcliffe's 


North Wilmington 


Bishop 29 


Johannesburg, S. Africa Taylor 11 


Johannesburg, S. Africa Taylor 11 


Methuen 


Adams 15 


Ben Avon, Pa. 


Bancroft 18 


Pasadena, Calif. 


Mrs. Jackson's 



81 



NAMES 

Jones, Bradford 
Jones, Herbert Norman 
Kane, Frank Paul 
Karnheim, Charles Frederick 
Kern, Alfred Dean 
Kopetzky, Karl Abraham 
Kung, John 

Larsen, George Harriman 
La Tulippe, Aime Augustine 
Lin, Frank Ching Fan 
Lou, Chang Howard 
Lough, Edwin Bailey 

MacDonald, Harry Alexander 
Martros, Martyr Edward 
Masuda, Katsunobu 
Matalene, Eugene Manuel 
Matalene, Henry William, Jr. 
May, Thayer Thomas 
Mercer, Aymer Turnbull 
Meyer, Paul John 
Mills, Hiram Francis 
Newcomb, Henry Martyn 
Palmer, Harry Wells, Jr. 
Peierls, Edgar Siegfried 
Petze, Edwardes Sinclair 
Phillips, Montague Burrell 
Piza, Emilio Edgar 
Pratt, Elliot Sterling 
Quarrier, Sidney Sayre 
Reed, Morris Houghton, Jr. 
Reid, Thomas Francis 
Richardson, Paul Harvey 
Sawyer, Bradley Moynan 
Schumaker, Albert Gailey 
Seward, Paul Sanford 
Sheh, Quincy Queen Shan 
Shipman, Thomas Leffingwell 
Stahl, Everett Howard 
Stewart, William Alexander 
Swartz, Benjamin Kinsell 
Tsai, Kuo Fong 
Tutein, Ernest Arthur, Jr. 
Tweedy, Laurance, Jr. 
Wade, Charles Alexander, Jr. 



RESIDENCES 


ROOMS 


Brookline 


Bnnrrnft 10 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Churchill 2 


Radnor, Pa. 


Clark 8 


Brookline 


Bishop 29 


Portland, Me. 


Bishop 19 


New York N Y 


Tucker 4 


Shanghai, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


BrooJcline 


Bancroft 5 


Lawrence 


Bishop 15 


Tientsin China 


Tflvlor 4 


Tientsin, China 


Clark 7 


Pelham Manor, N. Y. 




Mrs. Wainwright's 


A ndover 


Williams Hall 


Constantinople, Turkey 


Clark 15 


Tokyo, Japan 


Farrar 3 

A (X 1 X Oil *J 


Newark, N. J. 


Day 15 


Newark, N. J. 


Day 15 


Memphis, Tenn. 


Bishop 32 


Andover 


Adams 13 


T jfiiiyrpYiP.p. 


T<n WTPTIPP 

JLJiX TV X V^-LL^>^ 


Wait^HeW Vt 


Day 28 


AfliYigtoYiy N* Y 


Adams 6 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 23 


New York, N . Y. 


Mr. Stott's 


U^iltn'i'nntnn 7~)p] 

WW VVIIVLIVUVUIV, JLSWsv. 


Bishon 27 


Ppfprhnmimh AT 77 

X WsbK/l \JVJI \J U y 10, AT. AJ • 


Eaton 2 


San Jose Costa Rica 


Dr. Stearns's 


Lowell 


Draper 5 


Short Hills, N. J. 


Bartlet 9 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 23 


North Andover 


North Andover 


Middleton 


Farrar 6 


Maiden 


Day 10 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 11 


Guilford, Conn. 


Miss Carter's 


Tientsin, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


Andover 


Clement 7 


Berlin, N. H. 


Taylor 16 


Galveston, Texas 


Bishop 17 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Pease 9 


Tientsin, China 


Abbot 4 


Winchester 


Adams 14 


South Orange, N. J. 


Clement 8 


Pottsville, Pa. 


Taylor 1 



82 



Waldo, Gentry Chilton 
Watson, John Cairns 
Weaver, Gordon Read 
Wells, Louis Badger 
Wienecke, Louie Gustave 
Wolfe, Edwin Moulton 
Wright, Charles Blossom 
Wyer, Richard Farrar 



RESIDENCES ROOMS 

Omaha, Neb. Bancroft 18 

Steubenville, Ohio Pease 11 

Waterbury, Conn. Churchill 5 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Mr. Manning's 

Tulsa, Okla. Draper 2 

Coshocton, Ohio Day 3 

Los Angeles, Calif. Clement 8 

St. Louis, Mo. Farrar 6 
Lower Middlers— 103 



83 



CLASSIFICATION 



Classical Department — 
Class I — Seniors 
Class II — Upper Middlers 
Class III — Lower Middlers 

Class IV — Juniors 

Scientific Department — 
Class A — Seniors 
Class B — Upper Middlers 
Class C — Lower Middlers 



REPRESENTATION 



Massachusetts 


173 


Tennessee 


JNew York 


99 


Alabama 


New Jersey 


48 


Arkansas 


Connecticut 


36 


North Carolina 


Pennsylvania 


32 


XT T A 1 i 

North Dakota 


Missouri 


23 


South Dakota 


Minnesota 


14 


Florida 


Illinois 


12 


Idaho 


New Hampshire 


11 


Utah 


Ohio 


11 


Virginia 


Wisconsin 


10 


China 


Michigan 


8 


Canada 


Maine 


7 


South Africa 


California 


6 


Costa Rica 


Colorado 


6 


Japan 


Indiana 


6 


Philippine Islands 


Kentucky 


5 


Syria 


Delaware 


4 


Alaska 


Vermont 


4 


Brazil 


District of Columbia 


3 


Colombia, S. A. 


Kansas 


3 


Cuba 


Mississippi 


3 


Guatemala 


Oklahoma 


3 


Hawaiian Territory 


Texas 


3 


Mexico 


Georgia 


2 


Peru 


Nebraska 


2 


Turkey 






Total 



84 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



James G. K. McClure, 1866 

Leonard Huntress, 1866 
James Parker, 1870 
John A. Waterman, 1880 
Frank C. Babbitt, 1885 
George B. Case, 1890 
Thomas H. Spence, 1895 
Allan F. Kitchel, 1905 



PRESIDENT 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



STATISTICAL SECRETARY 



George T. Eaton, 1873 
Frederick E. Newton, 1893 
George F. French, 1897 



SECRETARY 



TREASURER 



Chicago, 111. 
Lowell 

Newport, R. I. 
Gorham, Me. 
Hartford, Conn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
South Beach, Conn. 

Andover 

Andover 

Andover 



Meetings, with a reception and dinner, are held at Andover each year in 
connection with the graduation exercises. The date for 1921 will be June 17. 
It is desired that correspondence regarding membership and information 
concerning past members of the Academy be sent to the Statistical Secretary. 



BOSTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



William B. Stevens, 1861 
Desmond FitzGerald, 1863 
Edward C. Smith, 1871 
Hollis R. Bailey, 1873 



PRESIDENT 

Alfred L. Ripley, 1873 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 



Marcus Morton, 1879 
Arthur B. Chapin, 1887 
Arthur D. Coffin, 1889 
Charles H. Wilson, 1893 



SECRETARY 

William B. Higgins, 1913; Andover, Mass. 

TREASURER 

Walter B. Binnian, 1904, 111 Devonshire St., Boston 



85 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 Stephen E. Young, 1894 

Fred B. Lund. 1884 William F. Merrill, 1895 

Joseph W. Lund, 1886 Arthur Diinkwater, 1896 

Elias B. Bishop, 1889 Philip W. Thomson, 1898 

Henry W. Beal, 1893 Joseph S. Seabury, 1900 

Raymond M. Crosby, 1893 Howard M. Bartlett, 1902 

Brewer Eddy, 1894 F. Abbot Goodhue, 1902 

Frederick B. Greenhalge, 1894 Philip L. Reed, 1902 
Robert T. Fisher, 1906 



CHICAGO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Louis C. Penfield, '85 I. Newton Perry, '05 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Raymond F. Snell, '14, 6 North Michigan Avenue 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Lewis Smith, 1885 Charles A. Otis, 1888 



DETROIT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

William T. Barbour, 1896 Lawrence K. Butler, 1897 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Kenneth L. Moore, 1910; 169 Van Dyke Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Burns Henry, 1896 C. Hayward Murphy, 1902 

Steuart L. Pittman, 1908 Kenneth L. Moore, 1910 



NEW JERSEY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT SECRETARY 

Forrest F. Dryden, 1889 Albert Frey, 1881; 331 South Orange Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Decker, 1910 Allan M. Hirsh, 1898 

Kinsley Twining, 1897 

86 



NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Francis R. Appleton, 1871 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Tracy H. Harris, 1882 Oliver G. Jennings, 1883 

SECRETARY 

Frank H. Simmons, 1894; 110 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. 

TREASURER 

Frank Dale Warren, 1879; 225 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Henry J. Fisher, 1892 James L. Mills, 1897 

G. Ernest Merriam, 1892 Fred S. Bale, 1902 

F. Maurice Newton, 1895 Douglas H. Cooke, 1903 

Herbert H. Ranisav, 1905 



NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred E. Weyerhaeuser, 1892 John Crosby, 1886 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Edwin White, 1902; 93 East 4th Street. St. Paul, Minn. 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Walter L. Murphy, 1868 William S. Wadsworth, 1887 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Horace O. Wells, 1892; Pine Street, west of Broad, Peirce School 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

George L. Herrick, 1869 Laurence T. Bliss, 1891 

Seneca Egbert, 1880 Harry B. Hickman, 1894 

Herman V. Ames, 1884 William H. McCarthy, 1907 

Joseph W. Lucas, 1885 Henry N. Merritt, 1908 

Sydney Thayer, Jr., 1915 



87 



PITTSBURGH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Southard Hay, 1898 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

M. B. Suydam, 1896 

SECRETARY 

James J. Brainerd, 1899; 1363 Shady Ave. 

TREASURER 

Chaimcey O'Neill, 1900 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. W. Burdick, 1898, Chairman 
G. B. Preston, 1877 
E. H. Brainard, 1888 
C. E. Beeson, 1890 

T. M. Jones, 3d, 1917 



Clinton L. Childs, 1898 
Turner D. Moorehead, 1906 
F. T. Hogg, 1913 
J. B. Blair, 1916 



ST. LOUIS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Sidney R. Overall, 1903; Federal Reserve Bank Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

James E. Allison, 1885 A. Linn Bostwick, 1904 

Walter C. Taylor, 1885 Samuel N. Holliday, 1904 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Major Marlborough Churchill, 1896 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Charles Sheldon, 1887 W. D. Wilcox, 1889 

Ord Preston, 1894 

TREASURER 

Duer McLanahan, 1917 
88 



SECRETARY 

Robert C. Dove, 1907; Shoreham Hotel 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Hon. Richard Wayne Parker, 1864 John A. Mcllhenny, 1888 

Irving H. Dunlap, 1881 Robert S. Hume, 1894 

Henry S. Graves, 1888 Murray A. Cobb, 1899 

A. Britton Browne, 1906 



OMAHA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Charles E. Metz, 1911 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Ralph Peters, 1911 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

John H. Caldwell, 1908; U. S. Trust Co. 



INDEX 



Subject Page 

Absences 23 

Academy 

Constitution 10-15 

History 10-15 

Location 15 

Administration Offices 32 

Admission Requirements 17-20 

Algebra 50 

Alumni Association 85 

Athletic fee 25 

Athletic grounds 33 

Bible 50 

Board 27 

Dining Hall 

Private Houses 

Boston Alumni Association 85 

Breakage Deposit 24 

Chapel 32 

Chemistry t . . . 52 

Chicago Alumni Association 86 

Classification 84 

Class Officers 22 

Cleveland Alumni Association 86 

Course of Study 41-43 

Cum Laude 66 

Curriculum 41-43 

Detroit Alumni Association 86 

Dining Hall 27 

Diploma Requirements 21 

Dormitories 29-31 

Faculty Houses 29 

Rents 25-27 



90 



Subject Page 

Scholarship Rooms 34 

Williams Hall (for young boys) 28 

Drawing 52 

English 48 

English Bible 50 

Entrance Examinations 21 

Entrance Examination Requirements 17-18 

Excuses, Out-of -Town . 23 

Expenses 24-26 

Faculty 6-7 

Fees, Athletic and Infirmary 25 

Founders of Phillips Academy 4 

French 45 

Furniture in Rooms 26 

Geography 52 

Geometry 51 

Graduation Fee 24 

Greek 44 

Gymnasium 32 

History of Phillips Academy 10-15 

Honor Students (1919-1920) 64-66 

Infirmary 32 

Infirmary Rates 25 

Latin 44 

List of Students 1920-21 69-83 

Mechanical Drawing 52 

Music 54 

New Jersey Alumni Association 86 

New York Alumni Association 87 

Northwestern Alumni Association 87 



91 



Subject Page 

Peabody House 31 

Philadelphia Alumni Association ... 87 

Phillips Academy 10-15 

Its Origin 

Constitution 

Phillips Inn 32 

Philosophy 55 

Physical Training 53 

Physics 52 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association 88 

Preachers 9 

Principals 4 

Prizes 56-60 

Prizes Awarded 1920 61-62 

Public Speaking . 49 

Recitation Buildings 31 

Religious Exercises 23 

Representation 84 

Scholarship Aid 34 

Self-Help 34 
Special Room-Scholarships 27 

Scholarship Funds 34-39 

Scholarship Honors 64 

Scholarship Rooms 34 

Senior Honors 65 

Spanish 47 

St. Louis Alumni Association 88 

Students, List 1920-21 69-83 

Swimming Pool 32 

Testimonials 17 

Trigonometry 51 

Trustees 5 

Washington Alumni Association 88 

Williams Hall 

Dormitory for Young Boys 28 



92 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FOURTH YEAR 



April, 1922 




Andover, Massachusetts 
THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1922 



1922 1922 1923 1923 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 



FEBRUARY 



.3 14 15 



2| 3 4 
9 10 11 
16 17 18 

23,24 25 



13 14 15 1( 

20 21:22 2i 



81 4 
10 11 



3 4 6 6 

10 11 12 13 
17 18 19 20 
24 25 26 27 
..I.. I.. I.. 



14 15 

21 22 
28 29 



MAY 



3 

10 
17 
24 
30 31 



5] 6 
12 13 

19 20 
26 27 



12 13 14 15 

19 20 21 22 
26 27 28 29 



2 

9110 
16 1 
23 24 
30 



2 3 4 
9 lOlll 
1G 17:18 
23 24| 25 
30:31!.. 



AUGUST 



7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28129 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



51 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 



2 
9 

15 

22 

29 30 



OCTOBER 



15 16 

22 



6 

13 

20 21 



NOVEMBE R 



19 20 
27 



13J14 
21 



2 
9 

15 16 

22 

29 30 



4 

11 
17 18 
24 



DECEMBER 









1 


2 


3 4 


5 


e| 7 


8 


& 


lOlll 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17!l8 


19 


20:21 


22 


-0 


24 25 


26 


27 23 


29 




31 











JANUARY 



T VU T i F i S 

! 1, 2, 3 4 5 6 
81 010 11 12'13 
15 ie!l7;18'l9 20 
22 |23:24 25 26' 27 
29 30 31 

............ 



FEBRUARY 



4 5| 6 7 » >.i 1!/ 
LI 12 13 14 15 1617 
)8 19 20 21 22!23 24 



MARCH 



.-|..|..|..| 1| 2! 3 
4 5 6 7 1 8 9 10 
11 12113 14 15 16 17 
18 19:20 21 22 23 24 
25 26:27 28 2*,) 30 31 



APRIL 



II 21 31 4: 5! 6: 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13114 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22' 23 24 '25 26,27 28 



MAY 



11 2 8 41 5 
6 7 8| 9,10 11112 
13 14 15 16117 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30i31 



JUNE 



II 2 

31 4| 5 6 ; 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 £3 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 







JULY 






s 


M 


T 


IM 


T 


F 


s 


1 


2 


- 


4 


5 


6 




s 


9 10 


11 




13 


14 


15 


16! 17 




r.i 




21 


22 


23 












■>'i 3i l 


























AUGIS1 
















~~3 


4 


'5 


6 










11 


1213 








17 


18 


lit 


20 


21 






24 




26 








30 


31 




SEPTEMBER 










1 


2 


3 


i 




6 




8 


9|10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 






24 








28 29 
















OCTOBER 




1 


21 3 


4 


5 


6 




S 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14115 


10 


17 


18 


19.20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 20 


: 


98 99 


» 


31 










.. 






I 




NOVEMBER 










1 




3 


4 


-5 


■i 


•H 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


10 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 23 24 




26 




28j29j30 




DECEMBER 














1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




9 10 11 


12 13 14115 


16 17 


18 


19 20 21 






24 












30 


SI 













CALENDAR 



January 1* 
March 23 
April 3 
June 15 



June 16 
June 19 to 



1922 

Wednesday, 8.1*0 p.m. 
Thursday noon 
Monday, 8.1*5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



June 20 and 21 Tuesday and Wednesday 



June 2k 

September 12 
September 13 
September II* 
December 21 



January 8 
March 22 

April 2 
June 11* 

June 15 
June 18 to 23 
June 19 and 



June 23 



Saturday 



Second term begins 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Third term ends for the two 

lower classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board Ex- 
aminations 

School entrance examinations in 
Andover, New York City, and 
Chicago 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



Tuesday, 9 a.m. 

Wednesday, 7.1*5 a.m. 

Thursday, 7.1*5 a.m. 

Thursday noon 

Christmas Vacation 

1923 

Monday, 8.1*5 p. m. 
Thursday, 12 m. 

Easter Recess — 
Monday, 8.1*5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 
Monday 

Tuesday and Wednesday 



Saturday 



Chapel followed by entrance 

examinations 
Fall term begins for two lower 

classes 

Fall term begins for two upper 

classes 
First term ends 
- 18 Days 



Second term begins 
Second term ends 
10 Days 
Third term begins 
Recitations close for two lower 

classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board Exam- 
inations 

School entrance examinations in 
Andover, New York City, and 
Chicago 

Third term ends for two upper 



3 



FOUNDERS 



Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS Hon. JOHN PHILLIPS, LL.D. 

Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS, Jr. 



Constitution and Deeds of Trust signed 
Board of Trustees organized 
School opened for instruction 
Act of Incorporation passed 
Theological Seminary opened 
Scientific Department opened 
Archaeological Department opened 
Theological Seminary incorporated 
Theological Seminary real estate purchased 



April 21, 1778 
April 28, 1778 
April 30, 1778 
October 4, 1780 
September 28, 1808 
September 27, 1830 
May 1, 1901 
April 16, 1907 
July 1, 1908 



PRINCIPALS 



ELIPHALET PEARSON, LL.D. 1778 — 1786 

EBENEZER PEMBERTON, LL.D. 1786 — 1793 

MARK NEWMAN, A.M. 1795 — 1810 

JOHN ADAMS, LL.D. 1810 — 1833 

OSGOOD JOHNSON, A.M. 1833 — 1837 

SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, LL.D. 1838 — 1871 

FREDERIC W. TILTON, A.M. 1871 — 1873 

CECIL F. P. BANCROFT, Ph.D., LL.D. 1873—1901 

ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 1903 — 



4 



TRUSTEES 



PRESIDENT 

ALFRED LA WHENCE RIPLEY, A.M. 
Elected 1902 

CLERK 

ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, Litt. D , L.H.D. 
Elected 1903 

TREASURER 

JAMES COWAN SAWYER, A.B. 
Elected 1900 



Andover 



Andover 



Andover 



JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D. 
Elected 1899 

CLARENCE MORGAN, A.B. 
Elected 1900 

CLIFFORD HERSCHELL MOORE, Litt.D. 
Elected 1902 

HENRY LEWIS STIMSON, A.M. 
Elected 1905 

ELIAS BULLARD BISHOP, A.B. 
Elected 1907 

JOHN ADAMS AIKEN, LL.D. 
Elected 1908 

FRED TOWSLEY MURPHY, M.D. 
Elected 1908 

JOSEPH PARSONS 
Elected 1910 

FREDERICK GOODRICH CRANE 
Elected 1912 

GEORGE BOWEN CASE, A.B. 
Elected 1920 



Cambridge 
Shelburne, Vt. 
Cambridge 
New York City 
Newton Centre 
Greenfield 
Detroit, Mich. 
Lakeville, Conn. 
Dalton 

Englewood, N. J. 



5 



FACULTY 



ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, A.M., Litt.D., L.H.D., Principal 

On the Peter Smith Byers Memorial Foundation 6 Chapel Avenue 

Instructor 1897-1903. Elected Principal 1903 



GEORGE THOMAS EATON, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
CHARLES EMERSON STONE, Ph.B. 

Instructor in French 
CHARLES HENRY FORBES, A.M. 

Professor of Latin on John C. Phillips Foundation 
ARCHIBALD FREEMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in History 
ALLEN ROGERS BENNER, A.B. 

Professor of Greek 
JAMES CHANDLER GRAHAM, S.B. 

Peabody Instructor in Natural Sciences 
JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
FREDERICK EDWIN NEWTON, Ph.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
CHARLES PEABODY, Ph.D. 



73 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1880 
158 Main Street 
Appointed 1890 
25 Hidden Road 
Elected 1891 
Phillips 16 
Appointed 1892 
Andover 7 
Elected 1892 
Phillips 5 
Appointed 1892 
Williams Hall 
Appointed 1894 
9 Salem Street 
Appointed 1895 
197 Brattle Street, Cambridge 



Director of the Department of American Archaeology Elected 1901 

WARREN KING MOOREHEAD, A.M. Hidden Field 

Field Director of Archaeological Exploration in New England Elected 1910 

and Curator of the Museum 
LESTER EDWARD LYNDE, A.B. 195 Main Street 

Instructor in Mathematics and Principal's Assistant Appointed 1901 



HORACE MARTIN POYNTER, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
PEIRSON STERLING PAGE, M.D. 

Physical Director and Medical Adviser 
GEORGE WALKER HINMAN, A.M. 

Instructor in Latin 
CECIL KITTREDGE BANCROFT, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin, Principal's Assistant, and Registrar 
CHARLES ARTHUR PARMELEE, A.M. 

Instructor in French 
ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, A.B. 

Instructor in English 
MARKHAM WINSLOW STACKPOLE, S.T.B. 

School Minister and Instructor in Bible 

6 



In Europe 1921-1922 
Appointed 1902 
193 Main Street 
Appointed 1902 
169 Main Street 
Appointed 1906 
Bartlet 5 
Appointed 1906 
Bartlet 22 
Appointed 1906 
79 Bartlet Street 
Appointed 1907 
189 Main Street 
Appointed 1907 



/"VT> T? T?T> 4AT1/T TXT T?T> T7XT/~"TT A TV T 

(jLORItL rKAJNKLlix rKLINCH, A.M. 


1 {% O 1 Ol ...... A- 

lz bcnool btreet 


Instructor in French and German 


Appointed. iyu/ 


/"IT A TTTvT* TV /T/"k/"VT> 17 "C , TT17CC T»„ TV 

CLAUDE MUUKL r UEbb, Ph.D. 


loo Main btreet 


Instructor in English 


Appointed iyuo 


rREDERICK MAY liUYCL, A.M. 


laylor nail 


Instructor in Physics 


A 4-^.^1 1 AAA 

Appointed, lyuy 


/"~<TT\7 TTT7T) * UTV F * fT A\T A T> 

(jUY HEBAKD EA1UJN, A.rJ. 


x5ancrolt o 


Instructor in Mathematics 


A • >^4 . . 1 1 AAA 

Appointed lyuy 


/"VCIT.7 A T 1 \ TVvT.XTT'T) A 1> 

ObvYALD 1UWLK, A.Jd. 


32 rmllips btreet 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed iyiu 


Tyrt A XTT/' /"V'DT">TT?XT A T> 

1RAJNK O liKlEJN, A.rS. 


A ,] „ ™ „ TT..1I 

Adams Hall 


Instructor in English 


Appointed iyiu 


f~> a Tr> T T?T)TPnT)Tr , U TDT7 A T , T , X , T/^TTT7T> A A T 

CARL rKlEDKlLH rr A 1 1 L1CHEK, A.M. 


Laton 7 


Instructor in Music and Philosophy 


Appointed iyiz 


T7M "> TV T \ 7 .1 1 T 1 TV YX7TT T T A "!\ T TTT> A HP/'vXT L ,f IV\ r l ,r P A T> 

rREDERIL WILLIAM HLA1UJN blOll, A.n. 


77 rJartlet btreet 


Instructor in English and Public Speaking 


Appointed iyi% 


T7<TvTI7TXT T<T , XTXTT>"\7' DDPTXIOfTPT) A TV T 

EDW1JN 1LJNJNLY BKEYVblEK, A.M. 


8 Judson Road 


Instructor in Geography 


Appointed lyio 


TTAH7 A T>rv TX7 A TVOTT7/~Vr> HPTT A 1 T T T 'II/ 1 !! Tt„ 1 \ 

HUWAKD WADbvVUKIH LHUKIH, Ph.D. 


rJisnop 10 


Instructor in German 


Appointed 1917 


Ttf\~\7 T^T7T7'T>T , 'T'T O TIT 1 XTVCO A T) 

ROY EVERE11 bPEJNCER, A.r>. 


remberton 4 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1917 


T T'QMMj'n Z" 1 ! I A T) T 170 X" TT* A A Tr PVA\ T A A T 

LEblER CHARLEb JNEVVIOJN, A.M. 


34 balem btreet 


Instructor in French and German 


Appointed iyi» 


T A TXTOT^XTVT 1 T7 DAfTTT A A I 

LAWREJNLE V. RU1H, A.M. 


laylor Hall 


Instructor in History 


Appointed iyio 


ill) a XT1V AT A V TTT?XTT , rvXT A T) 

rRAJNK MAY 15LJN1UJN, A. 15. 


A J „ T T . . 1 1 

Adams Hall 


Instructor in Latin 


Appointed iyio 


TT A T>/~VT TV / , 1 > A 'lX7"EVA~r> TV L'TL' A T>XTO A T> 

HAROLD LRAWrURD blEARJNb, A.n. 


Bishop 30 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 19 lo 


TTT7*XTT> "\7 TmPCTAV t'T?T T P V A T> 

HEiNRY PREblUJN KELLEY, A. 13. 


Day 30 


Instructor in Spanish and French 


Appointed 1918 


YS7TXTT?TT7'T TV TV/TT/^TI A T?T OTTvT'C O T> 

VvlJNrlLLD MIL HALL blDLb, b.i>. 


Day 7 


Instructor in Mathematics and Mechanical Draining 


A * j. limn 

Appointed 1919 


TT I7 l> U 17 DTP ~f?DW~\/T A XT T7T? A CT7T> A A T 

nLxv JjJiiiv 1 r KJl(Jl<lVl Ai\ rKAbJiilv, A.M.. 


118 Main btreet 


Instructor in Mathematics 


A„ t ^ 1 1 A1A 

Appointed 1919 


rrADr r t?tm\7 a t>tv r a n rvrv /~< \/~ -r r>__ t\ 
LtLUKItL LL>VVAKD UlMUtK, Jr., Ph.D. 


21 Phillips Street 


Instructor in Latin 


Appointed 1921 


KUbLUL LDW1JN JJA&L, b.r>. 


TTT'll* TT 11 

Williams Hall 




Ar»TA/AinTorl 1 < 4 Q 1 

/appointed t»zi 


WALDO EMERSON PALMER, A.B. 


54 Salem Street 


Instructor in M athematics 


Appointed 1921 



7 



THEODORE FERRY PLIMPTON, A.B. 

Assistant in Physics 



238 Main Street 
Appointed 1921 



FREDERICK JOSEPH DALY, A.B. 

Private Secretary to the Principal 
SARAH LOW FROST 
Librarian 



147 Main Street 
210 Main Street 

OTHER OFFICERS 
VIRGIL D. HARRINGTON, A.B. 18 Chapel Avenue 

Purchasing Agent and Manager of the Service Department 
HENRY S. HOPPER 25 Phillips Street 

Bursar 

JOHN H. BUTTIMER, S.B. Bishop 7 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 
MABEL L. JONES 33 Chestnut Street 

Secretary to the Principal 
ALICE T. WHITNEY 61 Bartlet Street 

Recorder 

MONTVILLE E. PECK Bancroft 1 

Assistant to the Physical Director 
ETHEL A. HITCHCOCK High Street 

Assistant in the Purchasing Agent's Office 
ETHEL M. EATON 67 Bartlet Street 

Secretary to the Principal 
MRS. G. R. CANNON 54 Salem Street 

Assistant to the Alumni Secretary 
ANN S. LESLIE 24 Brechin Terrace 

Assistant in the Treasurers Office 
MELVINA M. McKEEVER Isham Infirmary 

Matron at Isham Infirmary 
MRS. C. M. BAILEY Williams Hall 

Matron at Williams Hall 
EUNICE C. LOVEJOY 21 Lovejoy Road 

Assistant in the Treasurer s Office 
E. ROSAMOND GREENWOOD, A.B. Lawrence 

Assistant Secretary to the Principal 
ALEXANDER SUTHERLAND 

Instructor in Boxing and Swimming 
RAY ARTHUR SHEPARD, S.B. Draper 4 

Assistant to the Physical Director Appointed 1919 

EVELYN JENKINS, A. B. Ballardvale Road 

Assistant in the Library ' 
MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 3 Highland Road 

Assistant in the Superintendent's Office 



ACADEMY PREACHERS, 1921-1922 



Rev. MARKHAM W. STACKPOLE, School Minister 
Principal ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 



Mr. ALLEN D. ALBERT 

President CLARENCE A. BARBOUR, D.D. 

Dean JAMES A. BEEBE, D.D. 

Rev. EDWARD C. BOYNTON 

Rev. NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, D.D. 

Professor WOODMAN BRADBURY, D.D. 

Dean CHARLES R. BROWN, D.D. 

Rev. ROBERT W. COE 

Rev. HENRY H. CRANE 

Rev. VAUGHAN DABNEY 

Rev. HARRY P. DEWEY, D.D. 

Rev. D. BREWER EDDY, D.D. 

Rev. F. BOYD EDWARDS, D.D. 

Rev. PAUL REVERE FROTHINGHAM, D.D. 

Rev. JAMES M. HOWARD 

Rt. Rev. EDWIN H. HUGHES, D.D. 

Rev. PERCY G. KAMMERER, Ph.D. 

Rev. SIDNEY LOVETT 

Rev. WILLIAM P. MERRILL, D.D. 

Rev. CARROLL PERRY 

Principal LEWIS PERRY, Litt.D. 

Very Rev. HOWARD C. ROBBINS, D.D. 

Professor J. DUNCAN SPAETH, Ph.D. 

Rev. HAROLD E. B. SPEIGHT 

Rev. WILLARD L. SPERRY 

Professor HENRY H. TWEEDY, D.D. 



Paris, HI. 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Boston 
Worcester 
Medford 
Newton 
New Haven, Conn. 

Norwood 
Maiden 
Dorchester 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Boston 
Orange, N. J. 
Boston 
Morristown, N. J. 

Maiden 
Boston 
Boston 
New York, N. Y. 

Ipswich 
Exeter, N. H. 
New York, N. Y. 
Princeton, N. J. 

Boston 
Boston 
New Haven, Conn. 



9 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is not a private school, but an endowed 
academy, controlled by a Board of Trustees and administered 
under the written constitution of its founders. By the terms 
of this Constitution, or Deed of Gift, signed April 21, 1778, 
Esquire Samuel Phillips (1715-1790) of North Andover and his 
brother, John Phillips (1719-1795) of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
set aside tracts of about 141 acres on Andover Hill and 200 acres 
in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, together with the sum of 1614 
pounds, as a foundation for a school. This document, outlining 
the broad principles upon which the proposed institution was to 
be conducted, was composed by Esquire Phillips's son, Samuel 
Phillips, Jr. (1752-1802), with the advice and aid of his friend, 
Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826). Samuel Phillips, Jr. was after- 
wards Judge of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, 
President of the Senate, and Lieutenant-Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Although Judge Phillips derived many of his educational 
theories from the writings of John Locke and from the English 
nonconformist schools with the scheme of which he was familiar, 
his plan was nevertheless highly original. The purpose of the 
academy was specifically stated in the following words : — 

"And, in order to prevent the smallest subversion of the true intent of this 
Foundation, it is again declared, that the first and principal object of this 
Institution is the promotion of true Piety and Virtue; the second, instruction 
in English, Latin, and Greek languages, together with Writing, Arithmetic, 
Music, and the Art of Speaking; the third, practical Geometry, Logic, and 
Geography; and the fourth, such other of the liberal Arts and Sciences, or 
Languages, as opportunity and ability may hereafter admit, and as the Trustees 
shall direct." 

10 



The chief emphasis was laid on the development of character, 
and the Master was to take pains "to regulate the tempers, to 
enlarge the minds, and form the Morals of the Youth com- 
mitted to his care". It was stipulated, also, that the school 
" shall be ever equally open to youth, of requisite qualifications, 
from every quarter ". The government was placed in the hands 
of a self -perpetuating Board of Trustees. In order to prevent 
sectarianism and provincialism, it was specified that a majority 
of the members should be laymen, and that more than half 
must not be residents of the town in which the academy is 
located. The Trustees were hampered by no vexatious or 
trivial restrictions, but were given sole authority over the institu- 
tion. By the provisions of the Act of Incorporation, passed by 
the General Court, October 4, 1780, their number was fixed at 
never more than thirteen or less than seven, and they were 
permitted to possess real estate with an income not exceeding 
five hundred pounds and personal property with an income not 
greater than two thousand pounds. These holding powers have 
since been considerably enlarged by legislative enactments, as 
the school has grown. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Tuesday, April 28, 1778. Of the twelve original members, four 
were members of the Phillips family: Esquire Samuel Phillips, 
John Phillips, William Phillips of Boston, and Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. These men became in turn the first four presidents of the 
Board. The other members, all relatives or close friends of the 
Phillips family, were John Lowell and Oliver Wendell of Boston, 
Rev. Josiah Stearns of Epping, Rev. Elias Smith of Middleton, 
Rev. William Symmes of North Andover, and Rev. Jonathan 
French, Nehemiah Abbot, Esq., and Eliphalet Pearson of 
Andover. 

Phillips School, as it was called until its incorporation, was 
opened for instruction April 30, 1778, in a remodeled carpenter's 
shop on Andover Hill, thirteen pupils being present; before the 
year was over, fifty-two had registered. The first principal was 

ll 



Eliphalet Pearson, a stimulating teacher and stern discipli- 
narian, who established high standards of instruction and 
supervision. Shortly before he resigned in 1786 to become a 
professor at Harvard, a new wooden building was erected to 
meet the demands of the rapidly expanding school. Pearson 
was succeeded by Ebenezer Pemberton, a polite and scholarly 
master, who devoted much attention to the manners of his 
pupils. When he left in 1793, he was followed in office by Mark 
Newman, in whose administration the Andover Theological 
Seminary was founded, largely through the efforts of Dr. 
Pearson. This seminary, which was opened September 28, 
1808, was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees 
of Phillips Academy, and remained in Andover almost exactly 
a century. 

The fourth principal, John Adams, who replaced Newman in 
1810, raised the prestige of the school, increased the attendance, 
and enlarged the faculty. He published the first catalogue and 
made the first revision of the curriculum ; but his primary interest 
was in the moral welfare of the boys. The second Academy 
building was burned on January 28, 1818, and a new brick, 
colonial edifice, designed by the famous architect Bulfinch, was 
erected within a year; this "classic hall", described in Oliver 
Wendell Holmes 's poem, The School Boy, is now in use as the 
Dining Hall. In 1830 the Teachers' Seminary, a new institu- 
tion made possible by a bequest of His Honor, William Phillips 
(1750-1827) of Boston, was opened in a massive square structure, 
commonly known as the Stone Academy, built for that purpose. 
This Teachers' Seminary, combining the aims of a normal 
school and a scientific school, was the second of its kind in the 
United States. After twelve years of existence with only 
moderate success it was finally, in 1842, merged with Phillips 
Academy as the "English Department", a name which was 
changed in 1892 to a more nearly accurate title, "Scientific 
Department 



12 



In 1832 John Adams resigned at the age of sixty, and Osgood 
Johnson was elected principal. Unfortunately he died in 1837, 
of consumption, in his thirty-fifth year. During his adminis- 
tration the "Commons", dormitories known to so many gene- 
rations of Phillips boys, were built under the direction of 
Samuel Farrar, Esq., Treasurer of the Trustees. 

Samuel H. Taylor, whose reign of thirty-four years was the 
longest in the school history, became principal in 1837. The 
word "reign" is used advisedly, for he was an autocrat, severe 
in his methods of government and prompt to punish offenders. 
"Uncle Sam", as he was familiarly called, was a relentless 
drill-master in the classics and gained a well-deserved repu- 
tation for thoroughness and accuracy. He was a strong and 
vigorous personality, who made an enduring impression on all 
who came under his influence. In 1864 the Stone Academy 
was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by the present Main 
Building, which has since been twice reconstructed. In 1865 
Mr. George Peabody gave $25,000 to found the Peabody 
Instruct orship in Natural Sciences, first filled by the late 
William B. Graves. Dr. Taylor, on January 29, 1871, dropped 
dead in the vestibule of the Main Building. For the next 
two years the office of principal was held by Frederic W. Tilton, 
who, however, could do little in that short period. 

The modern era of development began in 1873 with the 
arrival of Cecil F. P. Bancroft, who was principal until his 
death in 1901. Dr. Bancroft, working in a quiet, tactful, but 
persistent way, brought about many needed reforms. He 
first made a complete revision of the curriculum, thus enabling 
the school to meet the entrance requirements of any college, 
classical or scientific, and greatly broadening the range of 
studies. In his effort to gather about himself a larger and 
more efficient body of teachers he was entirely successful. The 
attendance also increased: in 1873 there were 252 pupils; in 
1895 this had grown to 524, and after 1892 it never again 
dropped below 400. Dr. Bancroft also strove to secure additions 

13 



to the plant, especially by providing dormitories in which boys 
could live under the direct supervision of instructors. He was 
aided in this aim by Melville C. Day of the class of 1858, who, 
in 1892, gave $8000 for a new dormitory, Taylor Cottage (now 
Pemberton Cottage), which was the beginning of the present 
extensive system of houses for students. Mr. Day continued 
his gifts, providing in all six dormitories which to-day furnish 
rooms for 168 boys, besides the teachers in charge. At his 
death in 1913 Mr. Day made Phillips Academy his residuary 
legatee. His gifts to the school amount in all to over $800,000. 

On June 5 and 6, 1878, Phillips Academy celebrated its 
centennial anniversary with elaborate exercises, including an 
historical paper by Rev. William E. Park, an oration by Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and 
speeches by Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Gustavus V. Fox, 
and other distinguished men associated with the school. At 
this time a fund of $100,000 was raised, partly for the en- 
dowment of a principalship and a professorship in Latin. 

Dr. Bancroft's period was marked by both progress and 
expansion. He was a man of clear vision and foresight, firm 
will, and shrewd discrimination, who had the good sense to be 
patient until circumstances were favorable for pressing his 
projects. His policy has been maintained by his successor, 
Alfred E. Stearns, during whose administration Phillips 
Academy has grown in material equipment, in numbers, and in 
efficiency. In 1908, when Andover Theological Seminary was 
moved to Cambridge, the Trustees acquired the entire Seminary 
plant on Andover Hill at a cost of $200,000, thus more than 
doubling its property in land and buildings. In 1901 two 
generous benefactors of the school, Mr. R. Singleton Peabody 
of the class of 1857, and his wife, Margaret Peabody, estab- 
lished the Archaeological Department and provided for it a large 
endowment for instruction, publication, and research, and for 
the care and housing of collections in American Archaeology. 

14 



The official installation of Principal Stearns into office happily 
coincided with the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the 
founding of the school, held on June 16, 1903. The guest of 
honor was His Excellency, Sir Chentung Liang Cheng, Minister 
Plenipotentiary from the Chinese Empire to the United States, 
who was a student at Phillips Academy in 1880 and 1881. At 
the exercises in the new Borden Gymnasium the speakers were 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie, Hon. Robert R. Bishop, Sir Chentung 
Liang Cheng, and Mr. Stearns. On the same day Brothers' 
Field was dedicated with an address from the principal donor, 
Mr. George B. Knapp. 

Concerning the significant developments of recent years, im- 
portant though they are, little need be said here. At his death 
in 1917 Colonel Oliver Hazard Payne, of the class of 1859, be- 
queathed to the academy the sum of $500,000, this being the 
largest single gift yet made to the Trustees. In 1919, at the 
instigation of an alumni committee, a nation-wide campaign for 
a Building and Endowment Fund of $1,500,000 was opened, and 
has resulted in the securing of about $1,600,000. The income of 
two-thirds of this amount will be devoted to the salaries of 
teachers and officers. 

In the World War, Phillips Academy played a distinguished 
part. Its Ambulance Unit, which sailed overseas in April 1917, 
was the first to be sent from any American school, and its bat- 
talion, formed in February, 1917, prepared many young men for 
the army. At least 2400 of its alumni were enrolled in the mili- 
tary or naval service of the United States or its Allies; and 
eighty-seven gave their lives in the cause of their country. A 
Memorial Bell Tower, to be erected on Andover Hill, will com- 
memorate their loyalty and sacrifice. 

LOCATION 

Andover is a town of eight thousand inhabitants, situated 
on the Portland Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
twenty-three miles north of Boston. 

15 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY is national in its representation and 
democratic in its life and spirit, and is "equally open to youth 
of requisite qualifications from every quarter". It aims to at- 
tract students of serious educational purposes and high moral 
standards. 

The Academy is not a suitable school for boys who are idle, 
insubordinate, or lacking in self-control; nor is it adapted for 
those who require the constant supervision of teachers in the 
preparation of school work. Students who are found to be un- 
able or unwilling to meet the requirements, and those whose 
influence is injurious, must be withdrawn from the school. As 
maturity is not always to be measured by years, the school has 
no specific regulation as to the age of the candidate. In general, 
however, it has been found that boys of fourteen are able to meet 
the responsibilities of life in the Academy. 

The school provides accommodations and surroundings for its 
students which enable them to pass by gradual and natural 
stages from the paternalism of home life to the freedom that 
awaits them in college. Williams Hall, with its close supervision, 
special hours, and home life, offers attractive and helpful 
surroundings to the young boy just leaving home for his school 
career. A natural and progressive development is provided for 
subsequent years in the houses and halls which are in charge of 
married instructors. The regulations which obtain in all 
dormitories are here in force, but there is in them the atmos- 
phere of home. The later life of the dormitories is designed to 
develop a larger sense of responsibility and to prepare for the 
community life of college. Boys in the dormitories are under 
the supervision of instructors and are required to observe fully 
the regulations of the school. In the judgment of the school 
authorities the average boy will secure the best results intel- 
lectually and morally by following out this gradual change in 
residence. 



16 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



The requirements for admission to Phillips Academy consist in 
evidence of good character and of a satisfactory school record. 
The Academy being unable to receive all who apply for admis- 
sion, even when they can meet its minimum requirements, is 
obliged to discriminate among the applicants on the basis of 
their school records. It asks each candidate for admission to 
take certain specified examinations, in part to enable it to dis- 
criminate fairly among the applicants, but chiefly to enable it to 
properly classify those who are admitted. The school record 
already made by an applicant — interpreted to some extent 
by these examinations — determines largely the Academy's 
decision on each applicant. 

Students in the Academy arrange their work in accordance 
with the Course of Study as outlined on pages 41-43. This 
outline exhibits the work which is done each year by a 
student who is neither behind nor ahead of his class in any 
subject. It is not required that all the studies of a student shall 
be in the class in which he is rated; he is permitted to take in- 
dividual subjects below or above that class, if his preparation 
in the prerequisites of those subjects justifies such action. But a 
student ordinarily is not permitted to take courses in one class 
to the exclusion of uncompleted courses in a lower class except in 
subjects continuing through successive years. 

Applicants for admission to any of the three lower classes are 
asked to take entrance examinations set by the Academy on the 
work of such courses in its curriculum as they have completed. 
(In some subjects the examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board should be taken.) Each candidate should 
take the examinations for which his previous work fits him, 
irrespective of the class groups in which the subjects are listed 
below. 



17 



Junior ^° en ^ er as a norma ^ Junior (first-year class) a 

Q^ ass candidate must have completed an approved 

grammar school course. He must pass satis- 
factorily examinations (1) in the following topics of Arithmetic: 
common and decimal fractions, denominate numbers, per- 
centage, interest, and square root, and (2) in such essentials of 
formal English grammar as are treated in Kittredge and 
Farley's Concise English Grammar (Ginn & Co.). The examina- 
tion in English grammar will be combined with a test in spelling 
and composition. It is strongly recommended that candidates 
for the Junior Class become familiar with the declensions and 
conjugations of either Latin or French before entrance to the 
Academy. 

£ ower For those who wish to enter as normal Lower 

, , . 7 „ Middlers the Academy sets papers on the work 

Middle , . .. T . ±\* j 

nf ass done in its Junior year as outlined on pages 

41-42. These xaminations cover: 

one year's work in Algci^i ~, as described on page 50. 

one year's work in English, as described on page 48. 

one year's work in Latin, as described on page 44. 

one year's work in French (or German), as described on 

pages 45-46. 

TT Those who wish to enter as normal Upper 

Middle Middlers should take examinations on the work 

nj a88 of the Academy's first two years, as outlined 

on pages 41-42. These examinations cover: 
*At least one year's work in Algebra (see note below) 

♦Candidates for the Upper Middle Scientific Class should have completed Elemental y 
Algebra (Mathematics A, as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board) and 
should secure credit for this subject at the college for which they are preparing. Those who 
cannot secure this credit should take the Academy's examination covering its first years' 
work in Algebra, described on page 50. Candidates who pass that examination study 
Algebra 2 in the Academy. 

Normal candidates for the Upper Middle Classical Class are required to take the Acad- 
emy's examination on its first year's work in Algebra, described on page 50. If the 
candidate can secure credit at college for Elementary Algebra Comr lete (Mathematics A, 
as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board), he should Jo so, and the Acad- 
emy's examination in Algebra is waived. 

18 



two years' work in English, as described on page 48. 
two years' work in Latin, as described on pages 44-45. 
two years' work in French (or German) as described on 
pages 45-46. 

one year's work in German (or French) or Greek, as des- 
cribed on pages 46-45-44. 
As a substitute for any of its examinations the Academy will 
accept grades of 60% or better obtained on a corresponding 
examination of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
It will also accept credits already established (by examination 
or certificate) at the college for which the candidate is preparing. 
Candidates who have completed a subject which they do not wish to 
continue should obtain credit at college for that subject instead 
of taking the Academy's examination. The Academy's examina- 
tions are designed to determine a candidate's ability to do 
further work in a subject and ordinarily do not give credit for 
a subject that is not to be continued. 

Senior Each Upper Middler in the Academy at the 

Classes 6nC ^ °^ ^PP er Middle vear takes preliminary 

college examinations. Candidates for admission 
to the Senior Classes, therefore, should secure credit, at the col- 
lege for which they are preparing, for the work of the Acad- 
emy's three lower years or its equivalent. These credits are ob- 
tained by passing college entrance examinations, or, in the case 
of those colleges which admit on the certificate plan, by pres- 
enting to the college such certificates as it requires. 

The Academy occasionally admits to its Senior Class candi- 
dates for admission to college by the so-called "new plan". No 
candidate will be accepted on this basis unless he has completed 
an approved equivalent of the three lower years in the Academy, 
and has made an especially good record in scholarship. He must 
pass entrance examinations set by the Academy in those sub- 
jects already studied which he will continue. 

Students are not admitted to the Senior Class later than the 
beginning of the winter term. 

19 



^, . . Candidates who are admitted to the Academy 

Classincalion , . , . , 

and secure credits m the ways indicated in the 

preceding paragraphs are rated as 

Juniors, if credited with fewer than 10 hours of the Acad- 
emy's courses; 

Lower Middlers, if credited with 10 to 27 hours; 
Upper Middlers, if credited with 28 to 44 hours; 
Seniors, if credited with 45 hours. 

Procedure ^ n ma ^ m ^ application for admission to the 

, . Academy the form in the back of this catalogue 

^ should be used. It should be filled out care- 

fully and completely and forwarded to the Principal of the 
Academy. Testimonial letters may either accompany it or be 
sent later. 

Certificates of standing in schools formerly attended are 
required. At the close of the school year, in June, the Academy 
sends to these institutions for complete official records of the 
candidates' work. 

Each candidate should take in June such examinations as the 
requirements outlined on pages 18-19 demand. Candidates 
should not count on qualifying by means of September exam- 
inations without definite assurance from the school authorities 
of the possibility of their admission in this way. The pressure 
for admission in recent years makes such procedure difficult. 
Those who take college examinations or secure certificate credits 
at college should forward official returns to the Academy as 
soon as they are received. 

Present members of the school are allowed first choice in room 
reservations for the following year. Rooms are regularly as- 
signed to accepted applicants about August 1, and in the order in 
which their applications are filed. Space for indicating room 
preference is provided on the admission application form. 

20 



Entrance Phillips Academy entrance examinations for 

. .. candidates for the Junior, Lower Middle, and 
bxammations TT , rjJ1 , , t( i » j« 

Dates and Upper Middle classes, and new plan candi- 

p/ dates for the Senior class will be held on Tuesday 

and Wednesday, June 20 and 21, 1922. The 

schedule of hours is announced in May. The examinations will 

be given in 

Andover: Phillips Academy, Graves Hall. 

Chicago: Northwestern University Building, corner Lake 
and Dearborn Sts. 

New York: Room 306, School of Mines, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Examinations will be held in other large cities, in June only, 
if the number of candidates in any locality is sufficient. 

On Tuesday, September 12, 1922, examinations will be held at 
9.30 A.M., in Andover only, according to a schedule of rooms 
and hours announced at that time. 

For examinations held in Andover on these regular dates no 
fees are charged. For examinations held outside of Andover a 
fee of $5.00 is required. 

Specimen examination papers will be supplied upon request. 

~ . , No special students, except foreigners, are re- 

n , 7 . ceived in the Junior or Lower Middle year, and 

students . , , ... . . 

the Academy makes no provision for special 

students who are not candidates for graduation, or for entrance 

to college, scientific school, or professional school. 

Special courses may be arranged in the Upper Middle and 

Senior years, only at the written request of parents and by 

special Faculty vote. 

Diploma The diploma of the Academy is granted to 

Requirements students who have secured passing grades 
(a) in all required subjects in the course selected. 



(6) in subjects which amount to at least 68 hours of the 
curriculum, 

(c) in a sufficient number of the subjects recognized by the 
College Entrance Examination Board to complete 15 units, 

(d) in all subjects pursued in the senior year. 

_ . , . Written examinations are held in each study at 
Examinations , , . . Al . , , 

least once a term, but the term grading is based 

Promotions ° n ^ e resu ^ s °f D °th written examinations and 
daily work. A student who is guilty of dis- 
honesty in an examination may be suspended or dismissed. At 
the close of each term, a report of the student's scholarship 
and attitude towards his work is sent to his parents or guardian. 
Mid-term reports are also sent for all students whose work is 
below the passing grade, 60%, and for those who obtain grades 
of 80% and above. 

Q^ ags Each student is assigned to the special care of 

n — a member of the Faculty who is known as his 

^ Class Officer. This officer arranges the sched- 

ule of studies for each member of the class under his charge, 
and recommends such subsequent changes as seem desirable. 

. . The entire school is divided into groups of 

Division 

n approximately twenty students each. Each 

^ ^ group is assigned to the special charge of an 

instructor whose duty it is to familiarize himself with the 
previous history and present standing of the several members 
and to serve as their counselor. 

APPOINTMENTS 



7.45 a.m. Morning chapel. 



Recitation 
and study hours. 



8.07 a.m. to 1.00 P.M. 
Daily 4.07 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 

Appointments 8.00 p.m. Evening study hours begin. 

10.30 a.m. and 5.15 p.m. Sunday chapel services. 
Wednesday and Saturday afternoons are half-holidays. 

22 



Stud H urs Students are expected to occupy themselves 
^ with their studies or other school work during 



all study hours. 
Absences 



Every absence of the student from recitation, 
morning chapel, Sunday service, or from his 
room during study hours, must be accounted for. The accumu- 
lation of eight unexcused absences involves suspension from 
school. In all cases of illness, notice must be sent at once to the 
Medical Adviser, who investigates daily all cases reported. 

Special importance is attached to meeting all appointments 
immediately preceding and following vacation and recess periods. 
A failure to meet such appointments must be regarded as a very 
serious offence and may necessitate withdrawal from school. 

All out-of-town excuses must be obtained from 
u -oj- o p rmc ip a j Q n half-holidays and on spe- 

cial holidays such excuses are granted occa- 
sionally to those whose school standing is good. The student 
who goes out of town without permission forfeits his connection 
with the school. 

. . Students are required to be present at morning 

Religious chapel. The Sunday services in the Chapel 

Exercises ^ re ijgj ous wor k f the school are in 

charge of the School Minister, who is also the pastor of the 
Academy Church, an undenominational organization. Dis- 
tinguished clergymen are frequently invited to preach to the 
school. Voluntary communion services are held in the Chapel 
during the year. The Society of Inquiry (the Christian Associa- 
tion of the school) holds a voluntary meeting on Sunday 
evening, which is often addressed by an invited speaker. Dur- 
ing the winter term this society maintains a number of volun- 
tary Bible and Discussion Groups led by members of the faculty. 

Upon written request from their parents, students may be 
excused to attend the morning services of the Protestant Epis- 
copal, Baptist, or Roman Catholic churches. 

23 



EXPENSES 

Parents can estimate approximately the expenses of their sons 
at the Academy, and they are particularly requested not to 
furnish money beyond what is necessary for modest expendi- 
tures. Pupils who are supplied with much spending money, 
or who are allowed to incur debts, often accomplish little in 
their studies, and are liable to form habits which require their 
withdrawal from the school. Parents are earnestly requested 
to refuse permission to their sons to contract debts. 

The schedules of the items named below indicate the range of 
school charges. 

Table 1 indicates the range of the Academy's regular charges. 
Table 2 shows an average charge. Table 3 indicates the charges 
to scholarship students. 

Table 1 Table 2 *Table 3 

Tuition $200.00 $200.00 $0 to 200.00 

Room, light, and heat 100 . 00 to 350 . 00 225 .00 to 50 . 00 

Board 230 . 00 to 420 . 00 280.00 to 280.00 

Athletic fee 20.00 20.00 to 12.00 



$550 . 00 to 990 . 00 $725 . 00 $0 to 542 . 00 

Tuition Bills ^ e tu ^ on ^ or tne ^ ear 1S $200.00 divided as 
follows: three-fifths, or $120.00, payable Octo- 
ber 1; two-fifths, or $80.00, payable on March 1. Each student 
is required to deposit with the Treasurer on entering the school 
the sum of $20.00 to cover breakage and other obligations which 
may be incurred during the school year. The balance remaining 
after such charges have been deducted will be returned. 

An additional charge of $10.00 is made to members of the 
Senior class to cover the expenses of Commencement. A 
rebate of $1.50 from this charge is made if the student fails 
to secure his diploma. Students in Chemistry and Physics 
are charged for the supplies which they use. All bills are mailed 
to parents or guardians, but may be paid in person by the 
students. Class-room privileges will be denied to students 
whose bills are not settled on or before the dates mentioned 

above. As instructors must be engaged and other provisions 
*For explanation of the items in Table 3 see pages 34 and 25. 

24 



for education must be made by the school authorities for the 
entire year in advance, tuition charges will not be refunded when 
students are suspended, dismissed, or withdrawn during the school 
year. Checks should be drawn in favor of the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy. 

T n A charge of four dollars a day to each stu- 

/ nfirmarv • • • • 

g . dent is made for infirmary service which in- 

cludes room, board, and services of the regular 
nursing staff. Extra charges are made for operations and 
diseases requiring special nursing. 

Athletic Fee ^ charge of $20.00 is made for the main- 
tenance of athletics, but for scholarship boys 
this charge is $12.00 a year which may be paid wholly or 
in part by the performance of special work assigned by the 
Treasurer. Three-fifths of the total amount of this charge 
is payable October 1st, and two-fifths on March 1st. Students 
are not asked to contribute further to the financial support 
of the various school teams. 

R Rents Payments for student rooms in the school 
buildings are required as follows: three-fifths 
of the entire yearly rental on or before October 1 ; the remaining 
two-fifths on March 1. A deposit of $25.00, which will be 
credited to the first regular payment of room rent, is required 
when the contract for the room is filed and the assignment 
made. When a room is assigned to a student, his parent or 
guardian agrees by contract to pay the entire rental of the room 
up to the close of the current school year, whether the student con- 
tinues a member of the Academy or not. The right is reserved 
by the Trustees to transfer boys from room to room in the 
school buildings whenever changes seem desirable; such changes, 
however, do not relieve the original occupants from the obliga- 
tion of meeting the entire year's rent unless newcomers are 
secured to fill the vacancies. 



25 



Each room is furnished with a rug, desk, chiffonier, chairs, 
bed, and bedding. Towels are not included. 

No refund of deposits will be made until the close of books for 
the fiscal year, June 30. 

PRICES OF ROOMS FOR 1922-1923 

SINGLE ROOMS 
Andover, Nos. 3, 5; Clement, No. 6; Pease, No. 14; Woods, No. 8. 
Churchill, No. 4; Hardy, Nos. 4, 5. 
Woods, No. 7. 

Churchill, No. 6; Clement, Nos. 3, 5, 8; Tucker, Nos. 2, 4, 5; Tower 

No. 3. 
Woods, No. 5. 
Tower, Nos. 4, 5. 

Churchill, No. 3; Clement, Nos. 4, 7; Hardy, Nos. 1, 2, 3; Taylor, 

Nos. 5, 12, 19, 26. 
Day, Nos. 15, 34; Johnson, Nos. 6, 13, 16, 23; Taylor, Nos. 1, 6, 8, 

13, 15, 20, 22, 27. 
Abbot, Nos. 13, 14; Adams, Nos. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20; Bishop, 
Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; Clement, 
No. 1; Day, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; 
Johnson, Nos. 7, 14, 15, 22; Phillips, Nos. 3, 4, 7, 14, 15, 18; 
Taylor, Nos. 7, 14, 21, 28. 
Clement, No. 2; Johnson, Nos. 2, 9, 20, 27. 
Johnson, Nos. 1, 8, 21, 28. 

SINGLE SUITES 
$250.00 Clement, No. 13; Eaton, Nos. 3, 4. 

$300. 00 Andover, No. 4; Bartlet, Nos. 4, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 23, 24, 27, 28. 
$325 . 00 Adams, Nos. 1, 7, 18, 24; Bishop, Nos. 7, 13, 36; Day, Nos. 13, 36. 

DOUBLE ROOMS 
The price stated is the amount paid by each student — not the price of the 
room. 

$135 . 00 Abbot, Nos. 4, 5, 7, 16; Farrar, Nos. 4, 6; Pease, Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. 
$150 . 00 Churchill, No. 5; Tucker, No. 3. 
$175.00 Johnson, Nos. 4, 11, 18, 25. 
$200.00 Tucker, No. 1. 

DOUBLE SUITES 
The price stated is the amount paid by each student — not the price of the 
suite. 

$160 . 00 Abbot, Nos. 6, 15 ; Farrar, No. 5. 

$200. 00 Andover, Nos. 1, 6, 9; Bishop, No. 28; Draper, Nos. 1, 3, 5, 6; Eaton, 
Nos. 1, 5, 6; Pemberton, Nos. 1, 3, 5, 6; Woods, No. 6. 



$100.00 
$125.00 
$135.00 
$150.00 

$160.00 
$175.00 
$200.00 

$225 . 00 

$250.00 



$275 . 00 
$300.00 



26 



$225.00 Bancroft, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18. 

$250.00 Adams, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 23; Bartlet, Nos. 1, 2, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 30; Bishop, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 33, 
35; Day, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 33, 35; Taylor, 
Nos. 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25. 

$275.00 Phillips, Nos. 2, 12 

$300.00 Johnson, Nos. 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26; Phillips, Nos. 1, 8, 11, 13, 
19, 22. 

$350.00 Bartlet, Nos. 7, 20. 



jfo om About twenty "room scholarships" amount- 

. , . ing to approximately $50.00 each are available 
^ for deserving boys. These scholarships will be 
credited to the regular room charges on the recipients' term 
bills and will be awarded by the Principal to boys whose cir- 
cumstances compel them to keep their expenses at a low average. 

Dinin Hall ^ e e( l u ^P men ^ °^ ^he Academy includes a 
well-appointed Dining Hall which accommo- 
dates two hundred and fifty boys. A fixed charge of $4.00 a 
week, payable one term in advance, has been made during the 
year 1921-1922 to cover light, heat, service, and food such as 
soups, vegetables, cereals, bread, butter, milk, coffee, tea, etc. 
Meats, fish, eggs, and desserts are served a la carte at cost and 
are charged against meal-tickets which are sold at $5.00 each. 
The average cost has been about $8.00 a week. 

Private About fifteen private houses in the vicinity of 

Houses ^ 6 ^ ca, d em y' un d er license from the Trustees, 

provide board and lodgings for students, 
and no student may occupy any house not thus licensed by the 
school. Some of the houses provide furnished rooms only; 
others provide rooms and board, and some furnish board for 
students rooming in neighboring houses. The price of table 
board is $10.00 and $12.00 a week. Students rooming in private 
families may, if they desire, board at the Dining Hall. The 
price of furnished rooms, including ordinary service, is from 
$5.00 to $7.50 a week. 



27 



As engagements for rooms in private families continue to 
the end of the Academic year, care should be exercised in the 
selection of rooms. Engagements for table board may, on 
suitable notice, be terminated at the close of any term. Ar- 
rangements and payments for room and board in private houses 
must be made with those in charge of the houses. 



SUMMARY OF PAYMENTS 

Tuition: 1st payment, Oct. 1; $120.00 2nd payment, March 1; $80.00 

Athletic Fee: 1st " " 1; 12.00 2nd " " 1; 8.00 

Room: 1st " "1; three- 2nd " "1; two- 

fifths of total charge. fifths of total charge. 

Deposit: Payable October 1; amount, $20.00. 
Graduation Fee: Payable March 1; amount, $10.00. 
Table Board: Payable one term in advance. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Williams Hall Throu S h the S enerosit y of Prof - Edward H. 
A Dormitor for Williams, ^ r -> °^ the class °f 1868, the school 
„ in 1910 secured possession of a valuable piece of 

property for the housing and care of younger 
boys. The property, comprising several acres, adjoins the Old 
Campus and is within a short distance of the other school 
buildings. 

Williams Hall has attractive accommodations for forty- 
two boys. The rooms are spacious, light, and airy, and are 
heated with hot water and lighted with electricity. On the 
main floor is a common reading and recreation room. Table 
board is furnished in the building to all occupants of the house. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to provide in this building sur- 
roundings as helpful as possible for the best development of 
young boys, and to this end they have placed it in charge of a 
married instructor. Boys whose work is below standard may 
be required to report at seven-thirty each evening, when they 

28 



work under supervision and are free to consult the resident 
instructor and his assistant in regard to their studies. 

Williams Hall supplies a stepping-stone between the natural 
restrictions of the home and the somewhat freer life of a large 
school. Although the boys who live here have all the advan- 
tages that Phillips Academy offers, they are under somewhat 
closer supervision than is customary throughout the rest of the 
school. For the school year 1922-1923 the charge for room and 
board in Williams Hall, not including the regular tuition charge, 
will be $750.00. A limited number of room scholarships are 
awarded annually in this hall. A special circular explaining 
in detail the equipment and arrangements of Williams Hall, 
and containing both interior and exterior views of this building, 
will be furnished on request. 

„ „ The school provides for dormitory purposes 

Faculty Houses , . , . , • . Y i 

ten houses formerly occupied as private dwel- 
lings. These houses are suitable for younger boys, especially 
those who are members of the two lower classes. Each house 
is in charge of a resident instructor. The rooms are furnished, 
and the charges include heat, light, and care of the rooms. 

The Abbot House provides accommodations for eighteen boys, 
the Churchill House for six, the Clark House for fifteen, 
the Clement House for thirteen, the Farrar House for six, 
the Hardy House for five, the Pease House for nine, the Tower 
House for three, the Tucker House for seven, and the Woods 
House for five. 

Dormitories Through the generous gifts of Mr. Melville C. 

Day of the class of 1858, Mr. Warren F. Draper 
of the class of 1843, and a number of citizens of Andover, and by 
the purchase of the property formerly belonging to the Andover 
Theological Seminary, the Academy now possesses thoroughly 
modern dormitories providing at reasonable rates attractive 
accommodations for almost the entire student body. Below is 
given a brief description of these various buildings, and a list 

29 



of the prices of rooms in each will be found on pages 26-27. With 
the exception of some of the Faculty Houses and Williams Hall 
these buildings are of brick. All are furnished, heated by 
steam, lighted by electricity, and equipped with shower-baths 
and the modern sanitary conveniences. Most of the study 
rooms have open fireplaces. Each building or entry is in charge 
of a resident instructor. 

Phillips Hall, erected in 1808, was entirely remodeled in 
1912. It is divided by a fire wall into two separate entries and 
provides accommodations for sixteen boys in each entry. 

Bartlet Hall was erected in 1817 and entirely rebuilt in 1915. 
This building also is divided by a fire wall into two separate 
entries, and contains both double and single suites, accommo- 
dating twenty-one boys in each entry. 

Pemberton Cottage, erected in 1891, contains five double 
suites. 

Andover Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double 
suites, one single suite, and two single rooms. 

Draper Cottage, erected in 1892, contains five double 
suites. 

Eaton Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double suites 
and two single suites. 

Bancroft Hall, erected in 1900, contains sixteen double 
suites. The building is divided by fire walls into three separate 
entries, each entry accommodating ten boys. 

Day Hall, erected in 1911, contains twelve double suites, two 
single suites, and twenty single rooms. The building is divided 
by a fire wall into two separate entries, each entry accommo- 
dating twenty-three boys. 

30 



Bishop Hall, erected in 1911, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Day Hall and accommodates the same 
number of boys. 

Adams Hall, erected in 1912, is divided into two separate 
entries, each of which, like the Faculty Houses, is in charge of 
a married instructor. Each entry accommodates twenty boys. 

Taylor Hall, erected in 1913, accommodates twenty boys 
in each of its two entries and is in charge of two married in- 
structors. 

Johnson Hall, erected in 1922, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Taylor Hall and will accommodate the 
same number of boys. 

(For prices of rooms see pages 26-27.) 

Main This recitation building was erected in 1865 

Building and contains twelve recitation rooms. 



Graves Hall 



Graves Hall, devoted to Science, contains in 
addition to the large and well-equipped labora- 
tories for Physics and Chemistry, four recitation rooms, a 
lecture room, and a drafting room. 

Pearson Hall P earson Hall, erected in 1817 and remodeled in 
1878, is used for recitation purposes. It con- 
tains six large recitation rooms. 



Archeology 
Building 



This building contains rooms for the collection 
of the Department of Archaeology and a lecture 
room. 



Peabody House 



Peabody House bears the name of the founders 
of the Archaeological department, with the 
funds of which it was erected. The building carries out the 
expressed wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody that their bene- 
faction should promote the social interests of the student body 

31 



as well as further the study of American Archaeology. Quar- 
ters are provided for the Phillips Union and include a well- 
appointed grill, a large and attractive reading room, and a 
memorial room used as an assembly hall for receptions, lectures, 
and meetings of the various organizations of the school. 

A , . . . Brechin Hall is used for administrative and 

Administration ,™ . n 

Offices and horary purposes, lne lower floor contains 
T „ the offices of the Principal, the Treasurer, 

and the Registrar. A large hall on the upper 
floor is devoted to the library of about fourteen thousand vol- 
umes, which is in charge of a trained librarian and is open 
daily for the use of students. 

The Cha el ^ 6 ^ na P e ^' erected in 1875 and enlarged in 
1920, provides accommodations for the religious 
exercises of the school. The daily morning chapel exercises 
and the Sunday preaching and vesper services are held in this 
building. The Chapel contains the William Couch Egleston 
memorial organ. 

Borden ^ e ^ LCac ^ em y nas a l ar & e gymnasium, com- 

r . pletely equipped with modern apparatus, and 

in charge of a Physical Director who is also 
the Medical Adviser. Students of all classes are required to take 
regular gymnasium work. 

. „ j The swimming pool, adjoining the gymna- 

Swimmmg Pool . . ° n , . , * "* 

sium, is seventy -live teet long and thirty teet 

wide, and represents the most modern ideas in swimming pool 
construction. The elaborate filtration plant in the basement of 
the building assures the purity of the water used in the pool. 

The swimming pool was constructed in 1910 with funds se- 
cured entirely by the efforts of the students themselves. 

Philli s Inn ^ G scno °^ P ro P er ty includes a well-equipped 
hotel, situated near the centre of the grounds, 
under lease to a manager, and furnishing to parents and friends 
of the school quiet and comfortable accommodations. 

32 



The I. sham ^ G ^ ca( ^ em ^ mam t ams an infirmary, the gen- 
T r erous gift of Miss Flora E. Isham, whose name 

J it bears. The infirmary was completed in 1912, 

is thoroughly modern in all its appointments, and was carefully 
planned under the direction of experts in hospital construction. 
In addition to the general wards, it contains single rooms for 
those requiring special treatment, an operating room, and quart- 
ers for visiting parents. The contagious wards are completely 
separated from the ordinary wards, and at each end of the build- 
ing there is a large sun parlor entirely encased in glass. Boys 
who are sufficiently indisposed to be unable to attend classes 
are sent to the infirmary for proper care. Except when special 
arrangements have been made in advance by parents or guar- 
dians, the following regulations will be observed in the conduct 
of the infirmary. Patients at the infirmary requiring medical 
attention shall call in local physicians approved by the school 
authorities. In cases requiring the attendance of special- 
ists, the best men available in Boston will be called in con- 
sultation. In special emergencies, when operations seem 
necessary and parents cannot be consulted in advance, the 
Principal of the school assumes responsibility for authorizing 
such operations. The Medical Adviser may at any time 
examine and report upon individual cases. 

Athletic Brothers' Field, comprising twenty-three acres, 

Grounds * S * n c ^ ose P rox i m ity to the gymnasium and 

contains ample facilities for baseball, foot- 
ball, and track athletics. The Academy possesses other exten- 
sive grounds for various athletic sports, including baseball, 
football, soccer, and tennis. 

Bulletin ^ e bulletin, sl magazine devoted to the in- 

terests and history of the school and its alum- 
ni, is published four times a year and sent to all former 
members of Phillips Academy whose addresses are known. 



83 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



q h i i • The sums granted as scholarships vary accord- 

ing to the excellence of the boys in their 
studies, a student of the highest rank receiving 
a sum equivalent to the full tuition fee and room rent. Every 
new applicant for a scholarship must pay on entering the Acad- 
emy the sum of $50 toward his tuition. This sum is not re- 
mitted. At the close of each term scholarships are adjusted 
in accordance with the student's record in his studies during 
that term. Boys of limited means who possess scholarly ability 
and ambition are encouraged to apply for admission, and, if 
admitted, may be reasonably sure of financial assistance. 

~ . , Furnished rooms are set apart in various 

„ . . - dormitories for boys who are obliged to keep 

Provision for . . . , . 

Q h l h R their expenses within the lowest possible 

limits. A rental of $40 to $50 is charged each 

occupant of these rooms. Choice of room is determined by the 

scholarship rank of the applicant. 

q jr Tj j Ample opportunities are afforded by the Acad- 

emy to scholarship boys to earn a portion of 
their school charges. Service in the Dining Hall and boarding 
houses enables them to earn their board. Several agencies are 
assigned by the Bureau of Self Help and a number of students 
may earn a portion of the school charges by work in connec- 
tion with the school offices, and in caring for recitation rooms. 
An energetic boy may find various other chances for remunera- 
tive work. 

The William Phillips Fund of $4,633.33 
p established in 1795 by a gift of Hon. 

William Phillips and increased in 1827 by 

his bequest. 

The Students 1 Educational Fund, begun with a gift of $100 
from the Senior Class of 1854, now amounts to $5,700. 

34 



The Farrar Fund, a legacy from a former Treasurer, Samuel 
Farrar, established in 1865, amounts, with additions from 
income, to $22,000. 

The Clarke Scholarship Fund of $1,200 was established in 1870 
in memory of Mrs. John Aiken Clarke. 

The Samuel H. Taylor Memorial Fund of $3,700 was estab- 
lished in 1871. 

The Peter Smith Byers Scholarship of $500 was established in 
1878 by the late John Byers. 

The Class of 1878 Scholarship Fund, established by the Classi- 
cal Class of 1878, amounts to $920.40. 

The Jonathan Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1878 by the late Edward Taylor in memory of his father. 

The French Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 1879 by 
the bequest of Hiram W. French. 

The Caroline Parker Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1880 by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy. 

The Alden Memorial Fund of $5,000, a legacy from Dr. 
Ebenezer Alden, was established in 1881. 

The Gerard Sumner Wiggin Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1881 by the bequest of Lady Elizabeth Sumner 
Buckley-Mathew Fleming. 

The Stone Educational Fund of $25,000 was established in 
1882 by Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Valeria G. Stone Guarantee Fund of $1,400 was established 
in 1882 from premium received on stocks sold from the gift 
of Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Warren F. Draper Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Warren F. Draper. 

The Richards Scholarship of $1,450 was established in 1889 
by the late Mrs. Mary A. Richards in memory of her sons. 

35 



The Charles L. Flint Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the bequest of Hon. Charles L. Flint. 

The Henry P. Haven Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1890 by the estate of Henry P. Haven. 

The Emma Lane Smyth Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1890 by the late Ex-Governor Frederick Smyth of New 
Hampshire. 

The James and Per sis Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estatv 
lished in 1890 by the late Mrs. Mary E. Fairbanks. 

The Dowe Scholarship Fund, established in 1892 by the be- 
quest of Joseph Dowe, amounts to $3,097.98. 

The John Cornell Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was established 
in 1894 by the bequest of John Cornell for pupils from the town 
of Andover. 

The James Calvin Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 w T as founded 
in 1895 by his sister, the late Mrs. Mary W. Fairbanks. 

The Mary W. Holbrook Fund of $500 was founded in 1900 
by legacy of Mary W. Holbrook. 

The Edward Taylor Fund, a legacy from Edward Taylor, 
established in 1900, amounts to $1,000. 

The Ruby A. Carter Scholarship of $1,500 was founded in 1905 
by the late Mrs. Ruby A. Carter, in memory of her husband 
and daughter. 

The Herman Verh&ff Hartwell Scholarship of $2,000 was 
founded in 1907 by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Hartwell in memory 
of their son. 

The Timothy A. Holt Scholarship Fund of $26,000 was estab- 
lished in 1908 by the bequest of Timothy A. Holt for the benefit 
of pupils from the town of Andover. 

The George Ripley Fund of $2,500 was established in 1908 
by a bequest of George Ripley of Andover. 



36 



The James Huntington Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1910 by the widow and daughter of James Huntington, 
P. A. 1848. 

The Charles Clayton Clough Memorial Fund of $220 was 
founded in 1912 by his friends. 

The Allan Morse Penfield Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1913 by the legacy of Allan Morse Penfield, P. A. 1904. 

The George B. Knapp Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1914 by a legacy of Miss Katharine Knapp. 

The Morris L. Glazer Scholarship Fund of $100 was estab- 
lished in 1918 by a gift of Morris L. Glazer, Class of 1917. 

The James Greenleaf Fuller Memorial Scholarship of $200 is 
sustained by Samuel Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, in memory of his 
brother, and is available during his Senior year for a student 
of limited means, who in the judgment of the Principal embodies 
the best ideals of school life in scholarship, character, and 
influence. 

The Class of 1871 Andover-IIarvard Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by Henry S. Van Duzer, P. A. 1871, is awarded on the 
basis of high scholarship to a member of the Senior class who is 
preparing for Harvard; the award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his record 
up to that time. 

The Class of 1871 Harvard- Andover Scholarship of $300, also 
sustained by Henry S. Van Duzer, is available for a graduate of 
Phillips Academy during his Freshman year in Harvard Col- 
lege; the award, based on high scholarship, is made by the 
faculty of Phillips Academy, and is announced at the close of 
the recipient's Senior year in the school. 

The Henry P. Wright Scholarship of $300, sustained by an 
alumnus of the Academy in memory of Henry P. Wright, P. A. 
1863, late dean of Yale College, is awarded on the basis of high 



87 



scholarship and character to a member of the Senior Class who 
is preparing for Yale. The award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his 
record up to that time. 

The Winston Trowbridge Townsend Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by John A. Keppelman, P. A. '97, in memory of his class- 
mate and friend, Winston Trowbridge Townsend, is awarded 
at graduation to that member of the Senior class preparing for 
Yale, who, in the judgment of the Principal, is entitled, through 
scholarship, character, and influence, to special commendation. 

The Howard W. Beal Memorial Scholarship of $200, sustained 
by a member of the class of 1894, is awarded annually by the 
Principal to a worthy student of limited means. 

The Robert Henry Coleman Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$6000 was established in 1919 by Mrs. John Coleman in memory 
of her son, Robert Henry Coleman, P. A. 1912, who died in the 
service of his country in the Great War. The annual income 
from this fund (approximately $300) is awarded, at the end of 
his Junior year, to a student of limited means, who, in the judg- 
ment of the Principal, has displayed the most promise of main- 
taining the highest standard of worth, measured by character, 
scholarship, and general influence in the school. 

The George Webster Otis Scholarship of $250, sustained by 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Otis in memory of their son George 
Webster Otis of the Class of 1914, who died in the military 
service of his country, is awarded to a student who in the 
judgment of the Principal combines the qualities of sound 
character and high ambition. 

The George Xavier McLanahan Memorial Fund of $10,000 
in memory of George Xavier McLanahan of the class of 1892, 
was established in 1919 by his mother and sister. The in- 
come is to be used for the assistance of a worthy student, or 
students, of limited means. 



38 



The Gordon Ferguson Alien Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$5000 was established in 1920 by friends of the school, and the 
income is available for a deserving student of character and 
promise, and of limited means. 

TheLeRoy Martin Scholarship of $500, sustained by a brother, 
is available for a Phillips x^cademy graduate of limited means 
during his Freshman year in Yale University : the award is made 
by the Principal at the close of the recipient's Senior year in the 
school and on the basis of character and ability. 

The Rev. William Henry and Ellen Cary Haskell Scholarship 
Fund of $3,000 was established in 1920 through the contribu- 
tions of the Rev. William Henry Haskell, P.A. 1856, and his sons, 
Dr. Nelson C. HaskeU, P. A. 1883, William S. Haskell, P. A. 
1888, the estate of Dr. Pearl Tenney Haskell, P. A. 1888, Dr. 
Harris B. HaskeU, P. A. 1890, and Edward Kirk Haskell, P. A. 
1895; the income to be used in aiding a needy and deserving 
student to meet the regular expenses of the school. 

The Roger C. Sullivan Scholarships were founded in 1921 by 
Boetius H. Sullivan, P. A. 1905, in memory of his father. Four 
scholarships of $300 each are awarded annually to those mem- 
bers of the Junior, Lower Middle, Upper Middle, and Senior 
Classes respectively who have made the greatest improvement 
in scholarship during the school year. The awards are made in 
June and the scholarships become available to the recipients 
during the following academic year. 

The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship of fifty dollars 
is awarded annually to a member of the Academy, preference 
being given to a son of a member of the association. 

The John Reed Williams Scholarship is available to Phillips 
Academy graduates at Yale under the following terms of gift: 

"The income from the John Reed Williams Fund of one thousand dollars, 
* * * is awarded annually at the close of Freshman or Sophomore year, * * * 
to a member of the Academic Freshman or Sophomore class, preferably from 



39 



Phillips Academy, Andover, who is helping to support himself by his own efforts 
and has proved himself to be a man of high character, and of large promise, 
especially in English Literature or History." 

The Columbia University Scholarship. A scholarship, which 
practically amounts to the tuition charges, is granted by Colum- 
bia University each year to a student of Phillips Academy who 
has satisfied the full requirements for admission to the College, 
and whose standing in the Academy has been of sufficiently 
high grade to gain the recommendation of the school faculty. 
The scholarship may be renewed in the years following the 
Freshman year if a high grade is maintained. 

The Wesley an University Scholarship. Wesley an University 
grants each year to a student of Phillips Academy going to the 
University a scholarship equal in amount to the tuition bill 
of the Freshman year. Provided the quality of his work 
warrants it, the scholarship is renewed each year throughout 
the college course. The award is made to that student whose 
high scholarship, in the opinion of the Academy Faculty, en- 
titles him to the scholarship. 

In addition to these scholarships, prizes amounting to $1070.00 
are awarded annually. The conditions governing these prizes 
are given on pages 56-60. 



40 



SYNOPSIS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY 



As the subjects are taught with a view to the student's pro- 
gressive development, it is desirable for him to take the entire 
course in the Academy. In recent years the Academy has been 
forced to limit rigidly the number admitted to its Senior classes. 
In order that the student may plan his work to the greatest 
advantage, it is important that he decide as early as possible 
upon the higher institution which he intends to enter. The 
course of study is designed to furnish adequate preparation for 
any college or scientific school. 

THE CLASSICAL COURSE 

CLASS IV — JUNIOR CLASS III — LOWER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 

Required a week Required a week 

Algebra 1 5 English 2 4 

English 1 *1 French 2 4 

French 1 **5 Latin 2 5 

Latin 1 **5 German 1 or Greek 1 4 

16 17 



CLASS II — UPPER MIDDLE 



Required 
Algebra 2 
English 3 
Latin 3 
f German 2 
lor Greek 2 



Hours 




Hours 




a week 


Elective 


a week 


Elective 


4 


Chemistry 


°4 


Bible 1 


4 


French 3 


4 


Greek Testament 


5 


German 1 


4 


Classical History 


4 


Greek 1 


4 


Geography 


5 


American History 


4 






jAncient History 


5 




17 or 18 


English History 


5 






Physics 


°4 






Spanish 1 


4 





Hours 
a week 

2 

1 

2 

2 



Numbers placed at the right and above a subject indicate successive courses in the same 
subject. The courses are described on pages 44-55. References are to footnotes on page 42 



CLASS I — SENIOR 



Hours 

Required a week 

English 4 4 
Plane Geometry 4 
Electives 10 

18 



Hours 

Elective a week 

Algebra 3 2 
Chemistry °4 
Mechanical Drawing f3 
French 3 4 
German 1 , 2 , or 3 4 
Greek 1 or 3 4 
Greek 2 5 
American History 4 
jAndent History 5 
English History 5 
Latin 4 4 
Latin Composition 1 
Physics °4 
Spanish 1 or 2 4 
Trigonometry and 
Solid Geometry 4 



Hours 

Elective a week 

Archaeology 1 

Bible 1 or 2 2 

French 4 2 

German 4 2 

Greek Testament 1 

Harmony 2 

Horace 1 

Geography 2 

Philosophy 2 

Public Speaking 2 



THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR 



Required 
Algebra 1 
English 1 
1 1 French 1 
Latin 1 



Hours 
a week 
5 

*1 
**5 
**5 



CLASS C 

Required 
Algebra 2 
English 2 
llFrench 2 
Latin 2 



LOWER MIDDLE 
Hours 
a week 
4 
4 
4 
5 



16 



17 



♦This class meets twice a week, without home study. It is rated a one-hour course. 
This class meets six times a week, twice without home study. It is rated a five-hour 
course. 

"Each laboratory period occupies two hours, but, not requiring home study, counts only 
one hour on the schedule. 

tMechanical Drawing takes six hours of class-room time, but, not requiring home 
preparation, counts only three hours on the schedule. 

tNot open to those who elect Classical History' 

1 1 German may be chosen in place of French. 



42 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 
Required a week Elective a week 



English 3 4 


French 1 or J 


4 


Chemistry or Physics °4 


German or 


4 


Plane Geometry 5 


American History 


A 
* 


Electives 4 or 5 


Ancient History 


5 




English History 


5 


17 or 18 


Latin 3 


5 




Spanish 1 


4 




Bible 1 


2 




Geography 


2 



Hours 

Required a week 

English 4 4 
History 4 or 5 

Trigonometry 

and Solid Geometry 4 
Electives 6 or 5 



U 



CLASS A — SENIOR 



Hours 

Elective a week 

Algebra 3 2 

Chemistry °4 

Mechanical Drawing f3 

French 1 , 2 , or 3 4 

German 1 , 2 , or 3 4 

American History 4 

Ancient History 5 

English History 5 

Latin 4 4 

Physics °4 

Spanish 1 or 2 4 



Hours 

Elective a week 

Archaeology 1 

Bible 1 or 2 2 

French 4 2 

German 4 2 

Harmony 2 

Geography 2 

Philosophy 2 

Public Speaking 2 



Physical Training (3 hours a week) is required of all 3tudents. 

All Seniors must report to the Librarian for instruction in the use of the library. 



In order to define the work of the pupil in his Senior year, Upper Middlers are required 
to take preliminary examinations for some college- June examinations, both preliminary 
and final, are held in Andover by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

For references see footnotes on page 42. 



49 



STATEMENTS OF COURSES 



GREEK 

The first year (Greek 1 ) is devoted mainly to forms and the 
most essential principles of syntax. Benner and Smyth's Be- 
ginner s Greek Book is used. To aid the memorizing of inflec- 
tions and vocabularies there are daily exercises, both oral and 
written, enforced by incessant drill. During the second and 
third terms work in the grammar is supplemented by lessons 
from Freeman and Lowe's Greek Reader. 

The second year (Greek 2 ) is occupied with Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-IV, or an equivalent, with sight reading, 
translation from English into Greek, and grammar reviews. 
Great effort is made to secure simple, idiomatic English in both 
oral and written work. Grammar and composition are studied 
throughout the year and occupy a part of every recitation 
period. 

There is an elective course in the Greek Testament — one 
hour a week — open to both Upper Middlers and Seniors. 

The third year (Greek 3 ) is spent mainly in reading selected 
books of the Iliad and the Odyssey. After the dialect is mas- 
tered, more attention is given to the literary side of the poems 
and to the translation of Homer at sight, about 5000 verses 
being read during the year. 

LATIN 

The first year (Latin 1 ) is occupied with the mastery of such 
vocabulary, inflexions, and syntax as the better manuals for 
beginners provide. There is constant practice in the reading 
and writing of simple prose, and in observing the relation of 
Latin to English words. The course aims at a thoroughly 
dependable foundation for subsequent reading and study. 

In the second year (Latin 2 ) Books I-IV (or equivalents in 
selections) of the Gallic War of Caesar, and five or six Lives of 

44 



Nepos, are studied, with emphasis upon subject-matter, syntax, 
and vocabulary. Twenty per cent, of the total time allotted 
to the course is given to prose composition based upon the texts 
read. There is continual practice in sight translation. 

In the third year (Latin 3 ) the course in Cicero aims to make 
the student familiar with the chief characteristics of Cicero's 
oratory, with his life, and with the history and antiquities of 
his time. The work in Latin prose composition is devoted to 
connected narrative. The Catilinian Orations, the Archias, the 
Marcellus, and the Manilian Law or the Milo or Sallust's 
Catiline are read. There is also sight reading and practice in 
reading aloud. 

In the fourth year (Latin 4 ) diction and prosody receive at- 
tention and every effort is made to cultivate a sympathetic 
appreciation of good literature. Books I- VI of the Aeneid, and 
selections from the Bucolics, or from the Metamorphoses of Ovid, 
are read, with practice in reading at sight. Topics in the private 
life and customs of the Romans are studied and illustrated. 

FRENCH 

The first year's work (French 1 ) comprises the princi- 
ples of pronunciation, drill in the fundamentals of gram- 
mar including the inflections of the regular and the more 
common irregular verbs, of nouns, of adjectives, of participles, 
of pronouns; the uses of pronouns, the simple uses of the con- 
ditional and subjunctive, and the elementary rules of syntax; 
abundant easy exercises for oral translation into French, and 
the reading of about two hundred pages of easy French prose. 
The following texts have been used. Kuhn's Reader, Super's 
Reader, Aldrich and Foster's Reader, La TulipeNoire,L'Ete de la 
Saint-Martin, Sans Famille, and Fraser and Squair's Grammar. 

The second-year course (French 2 ) of four hours completes the 
elementary work in French and prepares for the College Board 
examinations in Elementary French. It includes a review of 

45 



elementary grammar and continued work in composition and 
translation. Such texts as Colombo,, La Mbre de la Marquise, 
Le Roi des Montagues, Syntax of the the French Verb, and Com- 
fort's Composition have been used. 

The third year (French 3 ) covers the requirement of the Col- 
lege Board in Intermediate French. Contes de Daudet, La 
DSbdcle, Les MisSrables, and similar texts furnish material for 
translation, and work in composition and grammar is done 
throughout the year. 

The fourth-year work (French 4 ) consists of rapid reading and 
translation of selected passages from English authors, with dis- 
cussion of helpful topics in French history and literature as they 
come in the course. This course is for those who have passed 
the college examinations and who wish to continue their work 
in the language. 

GERMAN 

The first year's work (German 1 ) includes a constant drill in 
pronunciation and a thorough course in elementary grammar. 
Abundant easy exercises are translated into German and used as 
the basis of oral and aural practice. A limited amount of mem- 
orizing of German idioms and poetry, and translation from Ger- 
man into English are required. Wesselhoeft's Elementary 
German Grammar, Bacon's German Composition, and Whitney 
and Stroebe's books have been used in this work. 

The second-year course (German 2 ) which completes the ele- 
mentary work in German, and prepares for the College Board 
examination in Elementary German, comprises a thorough re- 
view of the grammar and a considerable amount of more ad- 
vanced translation and composition. Conversational work is 
continued by the use of such helps as Pattou's An American in 
Germany. Ham and Leonard's German Grammar and Whitney 
and Stroebe's Easy German Composition have been used in this 
course and various texts like Wildenbruch's Das edle Blut, 



46 



Gerstacker's Irrfahrten, Riehl's Burg Neideck, and Schiller's 
Wilhelm Tell are read. 

The third year's work (German 3 ) prepares for the examina- 
tion in Intermediate German as set by the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. Grammar is hastily reviewed and advanced 
composition written throughout the year. Bernstorff's Hand- 
book of German Grammar, Ham and Leonard's German Gram- 
mar, and Pope's composition books have been used in this 
connection. Oral work is continued, and such texts as Frey- 
tag's Die Journalisten, Heine's Die Harzreise, Keller's Kleider 
maehen Leute, Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans, and Der Dreis- 
sigjahrige Krieg III and Fulda's Der Talisman are studied. 

The fourth-year course (German 4 ) of two hours a week is an 
elective, open to those who have passed the third year's work or 
the College Entrance Examination Board's German B, also, 
upon consultation with the instructor, to others who satisfy 
him of their ability. The course will be adapted to the maturity 
of the students and their proficiency in German. Half the time 
will be spent in conversational practice on everyday topics and 
German life and institutions, the remainder in rapid reading and 
interpretation of some phase of German literature. Wagner's 
Tannhauser has been studied and the original Middle High 
German poems of the old singers discussed and put into modern 
German. Students in this course are not recommended for ad- 
ditional college credits in German. 

SPANISH 

The first year's work (Spanish 1 ) is as follows: — (a) thorough 
drill in the principles of pronunciation; (b) rules of syntax and 
essentials of Spanish grammar including the inflection of verbs 
(regular and irregular), nouns, adjectives, pronouns, the uses of 
the conditional and subjunctive; (c) abundant easy exercises for 
translation into Spanish; (d) the translation of two hundred or 
more pages of easy Spanish prose, such as is contained in Hills' 
Spanish Tales, Berge-Soler and Hatheway's Reader, Morrison's 



47 



Tres Comedias, Alarcon's Short Stories, Isaac's Maria, and 
Supple's Spanish Reader; grammars such as De Vitis\ Hills 
and Ford's, Crawford's First Book in Spanish, and Moreno- 
Lacalle's Elementos de Espahol. 

The second-year course (Spanish 2 ) completes the elementary 
course in Spanish, and prepares for the College Board exami- 
nation in this subject. It consists of a complete review of Span- 
ish grammar and continued work in composition and translation. 
Such texts as Wilkins's Second Spanish Book, El Capitdn Veneno, 
Jose, Zaragiieta, and Umphrey's Spanish Prose Composition 
have been used. 

ENGLISH 

The work of English 1 in composition is based on themes, — 
simple narratives and descriptions — written in the class-room. 
Attention is given to the correction of grammatical errors in 
speech and writing, with necessary consideration of formal 
grammar; to elementary matters of the structure and the 
punctuation of the sentence; to spelling; and to the acquisition 
of a vocabulary. The work in literature consists in reading 
aloud and discussing in the class-room a few short works in 
verse and prose. Considerable emphasis is placed on enuncia- 
tion and pronunciation. (Students planning to enter the 
Lower Middle class in English are advised to read St. Ives, 
Nicholas Nickleby, and Les MisSrables, but equivalents will be 
accepted.) 

In the teaching of composition in English 2 , the general plan 
of the preceding year is continued, with a somewhat higher 
standard of requirement, the chief object being to secure plenty 
of practice. Themes are written outside of the class-room as 
well as during the recitation period. The study of some elemen- 
tary matters of rhetoric is begun. 

The textbook used for the work in composition is Ward's 
Sentence and Theme. The study of literature comprises the 
careful reading of some books and the rapid reading of others. 

48 



Among the books prescribed are: Richard II, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde, The Woman in White, The Virginian, and English Narra- 
tive Poems (Fuess and Sanborn). Particular attention is given 
to oral English, each student being required to deliver two care- 
fully prepared speeches each term and to read aloud in the 
class-room as frequently as possible. 

In English 3 the thorough study of formal rhetoric is begun. 
As many themes as possible are written outside of the class- 
room, and considerable writing is done in the class-room. The 
textbook used is Herrick and Damon's New Composition and 
Rhetoric. The course in literature includes the careful reading 
of six or seven books, selected in part from the list for reading (A) 
prescribed in the College Entrance Requirements; the lives 
of the authors; and the rapid reading, optional or required, of as 
many other books as possible. 

In English 4 the principles of composition-rhetoric studied 
in the preceding year are reviewed, with a higher standard of 
requirement in their application to writing. Herrick and 
Damon's New Composition and Rhetoric is used in this year also. 
Frequent themes and writing in the class-room are required. 
The course in literature includes the rapid reading of some books 
and the careful study of others; the life and times of the chief 
authors; and as much supplementary reading as possible. The 
work of this year completes the preparation for the compre- 
hensive examination offered by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Public Speaking is taken up as part of the Lower Middle 
English course. 

An elective course in Public Speaking comprises training in 
the preparation and delivery of expositions, argumentative 
speeches, and debates. A considerable amount of oral reading 
and extemporaneous speaking is done throughout the course. 

49 



ENGLISH BIBLE 

In the two curriculum courses the Bible is studied as an 
English classic. Attention is constantly given to the Biblical 
sources of common quotations and allusions. The methods and 
standards are those of the other school studies. Each of the 
courses extends through a year, with two recitation periods each 
week. 

The first course (Bible 1 ) consists of nearly all the Old Testa- 
ment narratives. The textbook is Sheffield's The Old Testament 
Narrative. If time allows, selections from the New Testament 
are taken up in the spring term. 

The second course (Bible 2 ) includes the historical books of 
the Old Testament and numerous selections from the poetical 
and prophetical writings. The textbook is the complete Old 
Testament in the King James version as published in four 
volumes in "Everyman's Library" under the title Ancient 
Hebrew Literature. 

Provision is also made in the winter term for the study of the 
life and teaching of Christ in voluntary classes led by the 
Principal and others from the faculty. 

ALGEBRA 

Algebra 1 . The study of Algebra is begun in the Junior 
year in a course occupying five hours a week throughout 
the year. Slaught & Lennes's Elementary Algebra is used as a 
textbook and Chapters I-XI and XIII-XVIII, omitting imagi- 
nary numbers, are completed. 

Algebra 2 . This course provides a review of Algebra 1 
and continues the subject through all the usual topics of Ele- 
mentary and Intermediate Algebra. It is required in Class C 
and in Class II. Candidates for entrance to the Academy 
desiring credit for this course must present a college entrance 
certificate giving credit for both Elementary and Intermediate 
Algebra. 

50 



Algebra 3 . This course covers the topics in Advanced 
Algebra specified by the College Entrance Examination 
Board and meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and 
scientific schools. If not offered for admission it may be used 
to secure advanced credit at some colleges. 

GEOMETRY 

Demonstrative Plane Geometry is begun and completed in the 
Upper Middle year of the Scientific Course and in the Senior 
year of the Classical Course. Four, or five, recitations a week 
are given to the subject. The chief aim of the instruction is to 
develop in each student the ability to reason clearly and logically. 
Accuracy, clearness, and completeness of statement are insisted 
upon. To develop originality and independence of thought 
about two-thirds of the time is devoted to the solution of exer- 
cises of gradually increasing difficulty. Candidates for entrance 
to the Academy may secure credit for this course by presenting 
a college entrance certificate giving credit for it. 

In the Senior year Solid Geometry is taught four hours a 
week during the winter term and two hours during the spring 
term. The course meets the entrance requirements of all col- 
leges and scientific schools, and, when not offered for admission, 
may be substituted for Freshman work in the subject. 

TRIGONOMETRY 

A course in Plane Trigonometry meeting four hours a week 
during the fall term and two hours during the spring term, forms, 
with Solid Geometry, a full four-hour course for the Senior year. 
It meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and scientific 
schools, and may be substituted for Freshman work in the 
subject, if not used toward admission. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

This course consists of six hours a week. It includes the use 
of drawing instruments, lettering, geometric constructions, 

51 



orthographic and isometric projections, developments, inter- 
sections, sectioning, and working drawings. Especial stress is 
laid on a thorough mastering of the fundamentals. The course 
meets the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board and in many instances so prepares the student that he 
can obtain advance credit for the subject on his entrance to 
college. Students of exceptional ability are given an oppor- 
urnity to do the more advanced work in Machine Drawing, 
or are given problems in keeping with the course to be pursued 
after entrance to college. 

PHYSICS 

The instruction in Physics is given by the use of a textbook 
and by practical work in the laboratory. The text is accom- 
panied with numerical examples and by qualitative experiments 
designed to illustrate physical laws and their application to 
practical life. 

Forty or more quantitative laboratory experiments are re- 
quired of each pupil. A careful record of the steps and results 
of these exercises is kept in a note-book which is submitted to 
the instructor for approval. 

CHEMISTRY 

The sections of the class in Chemistry, each meeting four 
times a week, cover the same ground and prepare for the 
entrance examinations in Chemistry of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

A two-hour course throughout the year prepares for the Col- 
lege Board examination in this subject and counts one half 
point toward admission to such colleges as do not require 
specified laboratory work. It does not meet the one point 
requirement in the subject. 

52 



The work is so arranged that students may profitably enter 
the class at almost any time in the year, and those who have pre- 
viously covered the ground may review the entire subject during 
the spring term. 

ARCHAEOLOGY 

The work of the department is chiefly confined to the United 
States, and research in other subjects than American archaeology 
is not extensively attempted. 

At present the collections number about 120,000 specimens, 
all of which represent the stone age art. 

The publications of the department number seven: — Bulletin 
No. 1, on the Exploration of Jacob's Cavern; No. 2, The Gor- 
gets; No. 3, Field Work in Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, Arizona, 
and New Mexico; No. 4, The Exploration of Bushey Cavern and 
the Exploration of Fort Ancient; No. 5, A Study and Descrip- 
tion of the Seven Prehistoric Earthworks found near Andover; 
No. 6, A Study of Hematite Implements found in the United 
States. Archaeological Explorations in the State of Maine. 

HISTORY 

Courses are offered in the Ancient History, English History, 
and American History. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

All students are required to take some form of exercise during 
the school year. Upon entering the school each boy receives 
a careful physical and medical examination, and a form of 
exercise suited to his peculiar needs is advised. Special atten- 
tion is given to those who lack normal development. The 
school, club, and squad teams give all students an opportunity 
Co compete in sports with those of their own relative ability. 

53 



No student is allowed to compete on school teams unless per- 
mission indicating his fitness is received from the Physical 
Director. 

MUSIC 

Opportunity for the study of piano and organ is offered by 
the Department of Music. The piano instruction is in charge 
of Messrs. Felix Fox and Harrison Potter of Boston. The organ 
lessons are given by the Director of Music. 

A two-hour course in Harmony has been added to the curric- 
ulum as an elective. 

Students who sing in the choir, every member attending two 
rehearsals a week, are offered one of three forms of compen- 
sation: (a) financial; (b) one athletic cut a week; (c) permission 
to count the choir work as one schedule-hour. 

Serious attention is given the school orchestra which re- 
hearses weekly and studies carefully both classical and modern 
compositions. 

The following recitals were given in the school chapel during 
the academic year 1921-1922: October, piano, Mr. Felix Fox; 
November, song, Miss Harriett Van Emden; piano, Miss Frances 
Adelman; December, Christmas organ recital, Mr. Pfatteicher; 
January, Harvard Glee Club; organ, Mr. Courboin; February, 
cello, Mr. Bedetti; April, organ, Mr. Farnam; Good Friday 
recital, piano and organ, Brahm's Requiem; May, piano and 
vocal, Mr. and Mrs. Shrewsbury; 'June, piano, Mr. Metcalf; 
piano and organ, Messrs. Fox, Potter, and Pfatteicher; Com- 
mencement organ recital, Mr. Pfatteicher. 

On the Wednesday afternoons of the winter term a course was 
given by the Director of Music in the History and Appreciation 
of Music, discussing such subjects as "The Symphony Orches- 
tra", "Music Forms", "Church Music", "The Oratorio", 
"The Opera", the talks being illustrated by piano, organ, the 
Edison Reproducing Machine, and the Ampico. 

54 



PHILOSOPHY 



A two-hour course is offered in elementary philosophy, such 
as is given in many of the higher European schools. During the 
academic year 1921-1922 the text-books have been Paulsen's 
Introduction to Philosophy, supplemented by Berkeley's Dia- 
logues between Hylas and Philonous, Jevons' Elementary Lessons 
in Logic, and Angell's Introduction to Psychology. 

The object of the course is to familiarize those students who 
possess philosophical interest with the nomenclature and rudi- 
ments of the various philosophical disciplines, so that they will 
be thoroughly conversant with these when they reach college 
or the university. 



55 



PRIZES 



The following prizes are offered annually for proficiency in 
the work of the several departments: 

IN ENGLISH 

The Draper Prizes for Selected Declamations, founded in 1866 
by the late Warren F. Draper, of the class of 1843, of Andover. 
Prizes of thirty dollars and of twenty dollars are awarded. 
The competition is open to all students. A preliminary trial 
before a committee is held early in May, the final competitors 
being chosen on the basis of the best rendered selections. 
The fifty-fifth competition occurred May 27, 1921. 

The Means Prizes for Original Declamations, founded in 1867 
by the late William G. Means, of Boston. Prizes of twenty- 
five dollars, of fifteen dollars, and of ten dollars are awarded. 
Students in any class may compete. Eight are selected for the 
final competition by the judges who later act as a committee 
of award, the prizes being given on the merits of both composi- 
tion and delivery. The fifty-fourth competition was held 
March 18, 1921. 

The Robinson Prizes for Debate, founded in 1896 by the late 
H. S. Robinson, of Andover, are open to three members of the 
Philomathean debating society and a team chosen from the 
school. A prize of thirty dollars is awarded to the representa- 
tives presenting the better argument, irrespective of the merits 
of the question. The twenty -fifth competition occurred May 
31, 1921. 

The Andrew Potter Prizes, sustained since 1904 by James 
Tracy Potter, of the class of 1890, in memory of his father and 
brother. Two prizes of thirty dollars and twenty dollars 

56 



respectively are offered to those members of the graduating 
class who shall deliver, at the Commencement exercises in June, 
the best essays on assigned subjects. The competition is open 
to Seniors. The eighteenth competition was held June 15, 1921. 

The Schweppe Prizes, sustained by Charles H. Schweppe of 
the class of 1898. Two prizes, one of thirty dollars and one of 
twenty dollars, are awarded for excellence in English, and are 
open to members of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. The 
tenth competition occurred in June, 1921. 

The Goodhue English Prizes, established in 1916 by the family 
of the late Francis A. Goodhue of Andover, in memory of his 
devotion to Phillips Academy. Two prizes are offered, one of 
fifteen dollars and one of ten dollars, for excellence in English 
literature and composition, including the more practical topics 
of elementary rhetoric. The competition is open to members 
of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. 

IN GREEK 

The Joseph Cook Greek Prizes, founded in 1879 by the late 
Joseph Cook, D.D., of the class of 1857. The prizes are twenty, 
twelve, and eight dollars respectively. The special topics in- 
cluded in the forty-fourth competition, June, 1923, will be 
translations at sight: 

1. From Homer. 

2. From Attic Greek Prose. 

There will also be questions on Greek literature and antiquities. 

IN LATIN 

The Dove Latin Prizes, sustained from 1880 to 1908 by the 
late George W. W. Dove, of the class of 1853, of Andover, and 
continued by his sons. The prizes of twenty, fifteen, and ten 
dollars are awarded for excellence in Latin and are open to 
Seniors. 



57 



IN THE CLASSICS 



The Valpey Classical Prizes, founded in 1893 by the late Rev. 
Thomas G. Valpey, of the class of 1854. Two prizes of ten 
dollars each are awarded; one for excellence in Latin Composi- 
tion, one for excellence in Greek Composition. The competi- 
tion is open to members of the Upper Middle class. The 
twenty-sixth competition occurred in June, 1921. 

IN MATHEMATICS 

The Corners Mathematical Prizes, founded in 1897 by the late 
E. B. Convers, of the class of 1857, of Englewood, N. J. 
Three prizes of twenty dollars, fifteen dollars, and ten dollars 
are awarded for excellence in the mathematics of the Classical 
Department, to be determined by an examination held in May. 

IN PHYSICS 

The Wadsworth Prize, sustained since 1900 by William S. 
Wads worth, M.D., of the class of 1887. A prize of ten dollars is 
awarded to that member of the Scientific Department who has 
obtained the highest rank in Physics for the year. 

IN GERMAN 

The Robert Stevenson German Prize, founded in 1904 by Robert 
Stevenson, Jr., of the class of 1896, in memory of his father. A 
prize of twelve dollars is awarded for excellence in German 
Composition. The competition is open to Seniors and Upper 
Middlers of both departments. 

The John Aiken German Prizes, two prizes, one of twenty dol- 
lars and one of ten dollars, are sustained by a member of the 
class of 1873 in memory of John Aiken, a member of the Board 
of Trustees from 1845 to 1863, The competition is open to 
Seniors and Upper Middlers of both departments, and the 
examination, based on which the prizes are awarded, will con- 
tain questions on German geography, a specified period of 

58 



German history, the lives and writings of German authors 
previously assigned, and one or more passages of German prose 
or poetry for translation into English. 

IN FRENCH 

The Frederic Holkins Taylor Prize was founded in 1908 by an 
anonymous friend of the class of 1868. A prize of eight dollars 
is awarded for excellence in French conversation or French 
composition. 

IN CHEMISTRY 

The Dalton Prize in Chemistry, a prize of fifty dollars, founded 
in 1915 by Frederick Goodrich Crane, P. A. 1884, is awarded 
annually to that student maintaining the highest rank in 
Chemistry for the year. 

IN HISTORY 

The George Lauder Prize was founded in memory of George 
Lauder of the class of P. S. 1897. A prize of fifty dollars is 
awarded for excellence in English History. 

FOR ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

The Butler-Thvring Prize, a prize of fifteen dollars, founded 
by Capt. Francis Butler-Thwing of the class of 1908, is 
awarded annually to that member of the Junior class who has 
secured the highest average in his examinations for entrance 
to the Academy. 

FOR HIGH SCHOLARSHIP 

The Faculty Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by San- 
ford H. E. Freund, P. A. 1897, is awarded annually to that mem- 
ber of the graduating class who has attained the highest general 
average in scholarship. 



59 



IN ATTENDANCE 

The John P. Hopkins Prize of $300, founded in 1921 by 
Boetius H. Sullivan, P. A. 1905, is awarded annually to that 
member of the student body whose record for the school year 
is free from demerit, absence, and tardy marks. In case more 
than one candidate shall have met the terms of this requirement 
the award shall be determined by the Faculty and on the basis of 
the general records of the candidates. In case no student is 
found to have completed the year free from demerit, absence, and 
tardy marks, the Faculty shall determine which candidate has 
most nearly met the terms of the requirements as specified and 
shall make the award accordingly. 

IN GENERAL EXCELLENCE 

The Fuller Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by Samuel 
Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, is awarded at his graduation to that 
member of the class who has best exemplified and upheld in 
his work and life at Andover the ideals and traditions of Phillips 
Academy. Only those who have been members of the school 
for at least two full academic years are eligible for this prize. 

The Otis Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained by Joseph 
E. Otis, P. A. 1888, and is awarded to that member of the Senior 
class who, having been a member of the school for at least three 
years, has, in the judgment of the Faculty, shown the greatest 
general improvement. 

The Boston Yale Club Cup is awarded annually by the Yale 
Club of Boston to that member of the Senior class who attains 
the highest proficiency in scholarship and athletics. 

The Feeney Cup, given in memory of James Warren Feeney, 
1913, by Byron J. Feeney, 1920, is awarded to that member of 
the Junior class who attains the highest proficiency in scholar- 
ship and athletics. 

60 



The Federation of Harvard Clubs Prize. The New England 
Federation of Harvard Clubs will award at Commencement a set 
of books of some standard author to that member of the Upper 
Middle class who is preparing for college, and whom the Prin- 
cipal, after consultation with the Faculty, shall deem most 
worthy by reason of high scholarship and character. 

A number of prize scholarships are awarded each June. The 
conditions governing these awards may be found on pages 37-39. 



AWARD OF PRIZES, 1920-1921 



The Draper 
Prizes 



The Means 
Prizes 



The 

Robinson Prizes 



The 

Andrew Potter 
Prizes 

The 

Schweppe Prizes 



The 

Goodhue Prizes 



The 
Cook Prizes 



The 
Dove Prizes 

The 
Valpey Prizes 

The 

Corners Prizes 



The 

Wadsworth Prize 



The 

Robert Stevenson 
German Prize 



The 
John Aiken 
German Prize 



(1) 
(2) 



Robert Gray Allen, Andover. 

William Edward Parnall, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



(1) Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(2) Hugh Langdon Elsbree, Preston Hollow, N. Y. 

(3) George Henry Danforth, 3d, Summit, N. J. 

Alfred Damon Lindley, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Adolph Bernard Loveman, Birmingham, Ala. 
John Joseph Sullivan, Jr., Fall River. 

(1) George P. Ludlam, 2d, New York, N. Y. 

(2) Hugh Langdon Elsbree, Preston Hollow, N. Y. 

(1) Donald Eaton Carr, New York* N. Y. 

(2) Richard Gordon Griffith, Indianapolis, Ind. 

(1) Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(2) Henry Forbush Howe, Cohasset. 

Honorable Mention 
Charles Hastings Willard, Minneapolis, Minn. 

(1) Carleton Stevens Coon, Wakefield. 

(2) William Greene, Denver, Colo. 

(3) George P. Ludlam, 2d, New York, N. Y. 

(1) Frederic Melvin Wheelock, Lawrence. 

(2) Harry Gay lord Dorman, Jr., Beirut, Syria. 

(3) John Webster Sanborn, Andover. 

Latin — Donald Eaton Carr, New York, N. Y. 
Greek — Harry Gaylord Dorman, Jr., Beirut, Syria. 

(1) Theodore Lyman Crockett, Brandon, Vt. 

(2) Gerald Dale Dorman, Beirut, Syria. 

(3) Thomas Smitham, Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

Malcolm Colby Henderson, New Haven, Conn. 

Wilfred Arthur Kemp, Methuen. 

Honorable Mention 
Stanley deJongh Osborne, Guatemala City, Guatemala 
and 

CarlJPhilip Sahler, Harlingen, N. J. 

(1) Grant Carpenter Manson, Detroit, Mich. 

(2) Stanley deJongh Osborne, Guatemala City, Guatemala 



62 



The 

Frederic Holkins 
Taylor Prize 

A 

Prize in 
American History 

The Washington and 
Franklin Medal 

The 

George Lauder 
History Prize 

The Dalton 
Chemistry Prize 

A Prize 
in Philosophy 



A Prize in 
Mechanical Drawing 



The 
Faculty Prize 

The 
Fuller Prize 

The 
Otis Prize 

The 

Butler- Thwing Prize 
The 

Boston Yale Club 
Cup 

The 

James Warren 
Feeney Cup 

The New England 
Federation of 
Harvard Clubs Prize 

The 

Harvard- A ndover 
Scholarships 



Martyr Edward Martros, Constantinople, Turkey. 

Honorable Mention 
Nicholas Guyot Cameron, Princeton, N. J. 



Hugh Langdon Elsbree, Preston Hollow, N. Y. 



Hugh Langdon Elsbree, Preston Hollow, N. Y. 

Robert Proctor McClure, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Honorable Mention 
John Joseph Sullivan, Jr., Fall River. 

Thomas Clarke Wright, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Hugh Langdon Elsbree, Preston Hollow, N. Y. 

Honorable Mention 
Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Divided between 
John Patterson Ramsey, Jr., Charlotte, Vt. 
and 

George Bell Dyer, New York, N. Y. 

Charles Hastings Willard, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Roy Wilson Wingate, Jr., Arlington, N. J. 

James Ferguson Burns, Jr., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Richard I^unbar Miller, Racine, Wise. 



Roy Wilson Wingate, Jr., Arlington, N. J. 



Charles Watson, 3d, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Thomas Smitham, Mauch Chunk, Pa. 



Randolph Hight Perry, Andover. 
James Martin, Newtonville. 

63 



The 

James Greenleaf Fuller 
Memorial Scholarship 

The 

Henry P. Wright 
Scholarship 

The Winston 
Trowbridge 
Townsend 
Scholarship 

The 

Howard W. Beal 
Memorial 
Scholarship 

The 
Robert Henry 
Coleman Memorial 
Scholarship 

The 

George Webster Otis 
Scholarship 

The 
George Xavier 
McLanahan 
Scholarship 

The Gordon 
Ferguson Allen 
Memorial 
Scholarship 

The 

LeRoy Martin 
Scholarship 

The 

Rev. William Henry 
and 

Ellen Cary Haskell 
Scholarship 

The 

Roger C. Sullivan 
Scholarships 



John 



The 
P. Hopkins 
Prize 



Donald McPherson Gray, Newton Centre 



Nicholas Guyot Cameron, Princeton, N. J. 



Dana Leslie Reed, Andover. 



Leo Francis Daley, Andover. 



George Knight Sanborn, Andover. 



Roger Walker Batchelder, North Reading. 



Gilbert Cunningham Cheney, Southbridge. 
Laurence Bradford Cheney, Southbridge. 



Carlos Eben Allen, Jr., Valley City, N. D. 
Everett Franklin Hatch, Andover. 

Nelson Cary Haskell, Jr., Amherst. 

Spencer Barrett Meredith, Hartford, Conn. 
Noel Henry Miller, Racine, Wise. 
Frederick Engstrum, Washington, D. C. 
Joseph Phelps Card, Highland Park, 111. 

Donald Broughton Grover, Petersham. 
64 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS, 1920-1921 



HONORS OF THE FIRST GRADE 



Awarded to those who have no grade lower than 82 and a grade of at least 
92 in half the number of hours. 



Seniors — 

H. L. Elsbree 
J. V. A. Fine 
T. Hale, 3d 
W. F. Halloran, Jr. 
R. A. Mitchell 

Upper Middlers — 

T. Smitham 
Juniors — 

R. E. McKinley 



3 terms 

1 term 

2 terms 

3 terms 
1 term 



A. P. Preston 

A. M. Rosenbloom 
J. W. Sanborn 

B. M. Spock 

C. H. Willard 



2 terms 

3 terms 
1 term 
1 term 
1 term 



A. M. Worthington 



3 terms 



1 term 



1 term 



HONORS OF THE SECOND GRADE 

Awarded to those who have an average of 85 and no grade lower than 72. 
Seniors — 



G. L. Bateman 


1 term 


0. P. Nicola, Jr. 


1 term 


H. A. Beck 


2 terms 


R. H. Perry 


1 term 


W. J. Carpenter 


1 term 


A. P. Preston 


1 term 


E. C. Cleveland 


1 term 


C. H. D. Robbins, Jr. 


2 terms 


J. G. Cushman 


1 term 


J. W. Sanborn 


2 terms 


J. V. A. Fine 


2 terms 


E. S. Skillin, Jr. 


1 term 


J. M. Gleason 


1 term 


F. T. Small 


1 term 


T. Hale, 3d 


1 term 


B. M. Spock 


2 terms 


E. F. Hatch 


2 terms 


G. C. Taylor, Jr. 


3 terms 


M. C. Henderson 


2 terms 


A. C. Walworth, 3d 


1 term 


D. W. Leach 


1 term 


F. M. Wheelock 


2 terms 


A. D. Lindley 


2 terms 


C. H. Willard 


2 terms 


N. L. Mansfield 


2 terms 


A. M. Wilson 


1 term 


0. B. Merrill, Jr. 


3 terms 


J. N. Winton 


2 terms 


R. A. Mitchell 


2 terms 


A. M. Worthington, Jr. 


2 terms 


>er Middlers — 








C. E. Allen, Jr. 


3 terms 


E. C. Mack 


3 terms 


D. E. Carr 


1 term 


J. Martin 


1 term 


B. C. Cutler 


1 term 


H. A. Paget 


1 term 




L. H. Sherrill 


1 term 





65 



Lower Middlers — 

F. M. Cleaveland, Jr. 2 terms 
W. B. Jones, Jr. 1 term 

G. R. Weaver 

Juniors — 

N. P. Bastedo 
O. D. Hogue, Jr. 
R. E. McKinley 



B. C. Turner 
L. H. Watson 
1 term 



2 terms G. K. Sanborn 

1 term C. H. Sanford, Jr. 

1 term K. Smith, Jr. 

G. F. Vanderschmidt, Jr., 2 terms 



3 terms 
1 term 



3 terms 
1 term 
1 term 



SENIOR HONORS 

CLASS OF 1921 
BIBLE 

John Gedney Cushman 

CHEMISTRY 

Thomas Clarke Wright 

ENGLISH 

Hugh Langdon Elsbree Charles Henry Darlington Robbins, Jr. 

Richard Gordon Griffith Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom 

Alexander Pearson Preston John Webster Sanborn 

Charles Hastings Willard 

FRENCH, ELEMENTARY 

Charles Bingham Collins John Patterson Ramsey, Jr. 

FRENCH, ADVANCED 

Hugh Langdon Elsbree Alfred Damon Lindley 

Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom 

GEOGRAPHY 

Robert Douglas Donaldson, Jr. Frederick Knowlton Hardy 

Allison Barnard Stout 

GERMAN, ELEMENTARY 

Henry Abraham Beck John Van Antwerp Fine 

Oliver Peter Nicola, Jr. 



GERMAN, ADVANCED 

Ronald Alexander Mitchell Stanley deJongh Osborne 



Carleton Stevens Coon 



GREEK, ADVANCED 

William Melville Hart Greene 



HARMONY 
Edward Whitney Flint 

HISTORY, AMERICAN 

Hugh Langdon Elsbree Ohver Boutwell Merrill, Jr. 

Richard Gordon Griffith William Mendell Newman 

HISTORY, ANCIENT 

Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom Charles Hastings Willard 

HISTORY, CLASSICAL 

Donald Wallace Leach 

HISTORY, ENGLISH 

Robert Proctor McClure 



John Van Antwerp Fine Randolph Hight Perry 

Alfred Damon Lindley John Webster Sanborn 

Frederic Melvin Wheelock 



MATHEMATICS, ADVANCED ALGEBRA 

Malcolm Colby Henderson Norman Lathrop Mansfield 

Alexander Pearson Preston 

MATHEMATICS, SOLID GEOMETRY 

Glen Latrobe Bateman Ronald Alexander Mitchell 

Norman Lathrop Mansfield John Webster Sanborn 

Arthur Morton Worthington, Jr. 

MATHEMATICS, TRIGONOMETRY 

Glen Latrobe Bateman Norman Lathrop Mansfield 

James Ferguson Burns, Jr. Ronald Alexander Mitchell 

Samuel Montague Clarke John Webster Sanborn 

Arthur Morton Worthington, Jr. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Glen Latrobe Bateman Walter Stuart Goodspeed 

Edward Whitlock Carlton John Patterson Ramsey, Jr. 



6? 



PHILOSOPHY 

George Kelleher Black Richard Gordon Griffith 

James Ferguson Burns, Jr. Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom 

Hugh Langdon Elsbree Arthur Morton Worthington, Jr. 

PHYSICS 

Malcolm Colby Henderson 



CUM LAUDE SOCIETY 

These members of the class of 1921 were elected to membership in the Cum 
Laude Society on the basis of their superior scholarship in all subjects for their 
Senior year. 

This society aims to bestow that recognition upon high scholarship in the 
preparatory schools which the Phi Beta Kappa Society gives to it in the colleges 



William James Carpenter 
Hugh Langdon Elsbree 
Everett Franklin Hatch 
Malcolm Colby Henderson 
Donald Wallace Leach 
Alfred Damon Lindley 
Norman Lathrop Mansfield 
Oliver Boutwell Merrill, Jr. 
Ronald Alexander Mitchell 

Arthur Morton 



Randolph Hight Perry 
Alexander Pearson Preston 
Charles Henry Darlington Robbins, Jr. 
Arthur Maurice Rosenbloom 
John Webster Sanborn 
Benjamin McLane Spock 
George Chadbourne Taylor, Jr. 
Frederic Melvin WTieelock 
Charles Hastings Willard 
Worthington, Jr. 



From the Class of 1920 
John Van Antwerp Fine 



68 



CLASS OF 1921 



The following students, members of the class of 1921 unless otherwise 
indicated, have entered college. 

Amherst — Rome Abel Betts, Edward Whitney Flint, Francis Henry Insley, 
Oliver Boutwell Merrill, Jr., Edward Harris Pratt (1920). 
Bowdoin — Phillips Haynes Lord (1922). 
Brown — David Greene Fanning. 

Cornell — Theodore Harrington Booth, John Eastland Coykendall, Henry 
Sweetser Wade (ex- 19 21). 

Dartmouth — Perley Mason Annis, Lloyd DeWitt Brace, Fred William 
Kaufman, Jr. (1922), Clarence Edwin Morrison, Jr. (1922), Irving Emerson 
Rogers (1922), John Webster Sanborn. 

Hamilton — David Douglas Hays (1922), John Bennett Turner (ex-1922). 

Harvard — Henry Abraham Beck, John Simon Borg, James Rollins Brew- 
ster, James Ernest Bunting, Jr., Clarence Joseph Burns, Harrison Chadwick 
(1922), Samuel Montague Clarke, Loring Conant, Carleton Stevens Coon, John 
Gedney Cushman, Howard Hettinger Davenport, Jr., Gerald Dale Dorman, 
Robert Douglas Donaldson, Jr., Philip Eiseman, Herbert Ellis (ex-1922), 
Willard Emery, Jr. (ex-1923), William Macdonald Fairleigh, William Henry 
Gratwick, Jr., Richard Locke Hapgood, Frederick Knowlton Hardy, Harold 
Kennedy Hudner, Kenzo Itoh (1922), George P. Ludlam, 2d, John Hoover 
McPherson (1922), William Mendell Newman, John Howard Newton, Francis 
Fay O'Donnell, Frederic Courtland Palmer, Allen Russell Parker, Jr., Randolph 
Hight Perry, Henry Reif Schneider (1921), Sidney Isaac Myer Rosenberg, John 
Sanford Shepard, Jr., Arthur Miles Sherrill, John Joseph Sullivan, Jr., Alonzo 
Rogers Weed, Jr., Frederic Melvin Wheelock, Thomas Clarke Wright. 

Lehigh — Oliver Peter Nicola, Jr. 

McGill University — Thomas Francis Reid (1923). 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Ralph Kirk Askew, Jr., 
Henry George Atha, Glen Latrobe Bateman, Roger Gilbreth Buzzell (1922), 
Edward Whitlock Carlton, Russell Lawrence Damon, Garfield Albee Drew, 
Wilbur Leroy Gaines (1922), Joseph Helling, 2d, Norman Lathrop Mansfield, 
Ronald Alexander Mitchell, Charles Louis Petze, Jr. (1922), John Patterson 
Ramsey, Jr., Casper Ranger, 2d, John Parker Sawyer (1922), Arthur Ronald 
Barton Oram Sheppard (1922), Arthur Kwang I Sun, Stanley McDowell 
Thomson (ex-1921), Arthur Morton Worthington, Jr., William Wraith, Jr. 

University of Michigan — Walter Stuart Goodspeed, William Edward 
Parnall. 

New York University — Howard Snow (ex-1921). 
Oberlin — Basil Walker. 



CG 



Ohio State College — Harold Charles Dunlap (1922). 
University of Pennsylvania — Thomas Molten Hornbeck. 
Pomona — Paul Harwood Dudley. 

Princeton — Robert Douglas Bright, John Guion Coleman (1920), Lenard 
Ames Draper, Dickinson Curtis Duffield, William Dwight, Alexander Euston, 
Robert Robertson Ferguson, Walter Rockwood Ferris, Jr. (ex-1921), John Van 
Antwerp Fine, Richard Gordon Griffith, John Richard Hutt (1922), John 
Othniel Ives, Francis Ray Kloman (ex- 1921), Frank Pelletreau Mathews, 
Walter Anthony Rentschler (1922), Charles Henry Darlington Robbins, Jr., 
Robert Stoddart Robertson (1922), Donald Russell, Carl Philip Sahler, Edgar 
Jay Sherman, 2d (ex-1922), Theodore Dwight Stevenson, Neil Conwell Stilwell, 
James Ruggles Thorpe, Saxby Merle Tillson, Frederick Porter Todd (ex-1922), 
George Leo Van Wyck, Charles Morris Weinberg, Roy Wilson Wingate, Jr., 
John Norton Winton. 

Swarthmore — Hugh Langdon Elsbree. 

University of Vermont — William James Van Patten. 

Wesleyan — Spencer Barrett Meredith. 

Williams — Roger Brush Haviland, Pierce Onthank (1922), Alfred Kittredge 
Pearson, Edward Simeon Skillin, Jr., Judson Penfield Smith. 

University of Wisconsin — John B. Cassody (ex-1922), John Michael 
Kohler, Raymond Mills Lull (ex-1922). 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute — Duncan Mclnnes. 

Yale — John Kenly Bacon, George Kelleher Black, John James Boland, Jr., 
James Ferguson Burns, Jr., William James Carpenter, Sinley Kong Yuen 
Chang (1922), Alexander Bierce Clark, Jr., Kempton Clark, Edwin Clarence 
Cleveland, Caleb Camp Curtis, Thomas Darling, Jr., Graham Devine, Newton 
Learnard Dillaway, George Bell Dyer (1922), Thomas Evans, Charles Stafford 
Gage, John MacArthur Gleason, Robert Redington Grant (1922), William 
Francis Halloran, Jr., Luther Salem Hammond, Jr., Albert Henry Harden- 
bergh, Everett Franklin Hatch, Malcolm Colby Henderson, William Cecil 
Hogg, Alfred Herbert Hunt, Jr., David Calhoun Jones, Glen William Keith, 
John Andrew Knox, Herman Jules Koehler, Jr., James Pollock Kohler, Jr. 
(1920), W f alter J. Kohler, Jr., Donald Wallace Leach, Louis Augustus Lincoln, 
Alfred Damon Lindley, Robert Proctor McClure, Gordon McGregor, Edwin 
Potter Mengel, Gilman Gray Page, Alexander Pearson Preston, Walter Grey 
Preston, Jr., (1922), Stuart Percy Randall, Dana Leslie Reed, Richard Reiner, 
Thomas Peter de Quartel Richardson, James Waller Rogers (ex- 1921), Arthur 
Maurice Rosenbloom, Hiram Goodrich Ross, Morris Bernard Sanders, Jr., 
William Seth Serat, Theodore Campbell Sheaffer, Frederick Trimble Small, Ben- 
jamin McLane Spock, Donald Day Stevenson, Robert Stevenson, 3d, Allison 
Barnard Stout, Harold Strickland (1922), Oliver Cromwell Thornton, Arthur 
Clarence Walworth, 3d, Alan Vigneron Weaver (1920), Frederick Chapin 
Wells (1922), Daniel Ewing Wight, Henry Augustus Willard, 2d, David 
Payson Williams, Alfred Mayo Wilson. 



70 



STUDENTS 



CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT 



CLASS I— SENIORS 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Allen, Carlos Eben, Jr. 


Valley City, N. D. 


Pemberton 6 


Blazier, Eugene Edward, Jr. 


Portland, Ore. 


Phillips 1 


Bowen, Lansdon Hebbard 


White Plains, N. Y. 


Bartlet 16 


Brandman, Harrv Schiller 


New York, N. Y. 


Abbot 14 


Brosseau, Louis Pierre 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 7 


Bucknam, Gordon 


Wellesley Hills 


Phillips 4 


Cameron, Nicholas Guyot 


Princeton, N . J. 


Abbot 8 


Clark, Robert Ober 


Winnetka, III. 


Miss Cheever's 


Clough, Charles Asa, Jr. 


Vineyard Haven 


Day 24 


Collins, Charles Bingham 


Cortland, N. Y. 


Phillips 20 


Crockett, Theodore Lvman 


Brandon, Vt. 


Hardy 4 


Crosby, Henrv Stetson 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet 18 


Curlee, Shelbv Hammond, Jr. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Bishop 35 


Cutler, Howard McKeen 


Andover 


9 Abbot St. 


Daley, Leo Francis 


Andover 


Bishop 3 


DeLuca, Theodore 


Andover 


Clement 10 


Doggett, Walton Porter 


East Dedham 


Bancroft 7 


Dorman, Harrv Gavlord, Jr. 


Beirut, Syria 


Eaton 1 


Durgin, James Henry 


Bradford 


Phillips 11 


Evans, Walker, 3d 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Holt's 


Finney, Howard, Jr. 


Upper Montclair, N. J. Clark 11 


Fitchen, John Frederick, 3d 


Albany, N. Y. 


Bishop 31 


Forrest, William Sylvester, Jr. 


Highland Park, III. 


Day 34 


Hale, Thomas, 3d 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Bartlet 1 


Hannum, Robert Read 


Newburyport 


Clark 4 


Hobson, William Langhorne, Jr. 


Rockville Centre, L. I., 


N. Y. Phillips 6 


Holbrook, Harold Ahrens 


Newton Centre 


Adams 15 


Howe, Henry Forbush 


Cohasset 


Bancroft 6 


Husband, Richard Wellington, Jr. 


Hanover, N. H. 


Phillips 22 


Huttig, John 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Phillips 10 


Jennings, Lawrence Kirtland 


Fairfield, Conn. 


Bishop 14 


Kellogg, Preston Paris 


Glens Falls, N. Y. 


Bartlet 30 


Lackey, Frank Danby, Jr. 


Wilmington, Del. 


Draper 6 


Lewis, Whitney Connor 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Bartlet 1 


Loomis, Loren Hart 


New Haven, Conn. 


Clement 12 



71 



Name 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Mack, Edward Clarence 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 30 


Manson, Grant Carpenter 


Detroit, Mich. 


Miss Cheever's 


Martin, James 


Newtonville 


Bartlet 17 


Monroe, John Hill 


Brookline 


Bishop 33 


Multer, Smith Lewis, Jr. 


East Orange, N. J. 


Taylor 23 


Osborne, Stanley deJongh 


Guatemala City, Guatemala Andover 5 


Riggs, George Overton 


Washington, D. C. 


Phillips 18 


Riley, William Alton 


North Attleboro 


Day 23 


Riley, William Charles 


Bristol, Conn. 


Day 29 


Ross, Donald Fassette 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Day 19 


Sargent, Paul Brainerd 


Winchester 


Bartlet 13 


Sherrill, Leicester Haydon 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Bartlet 17 


Silver, Henry Mann 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 14 


Smith, Macauley Letchworth 


Louisville, Ky. 


Bartlet 26 


Smitham, Thomas 


Mauch Chunk, Pa. 


Bartlet 10 


Stillman, Charles Latimer 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 2 


Todd, Charles Lee, Jr. 


South Lincoln 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Walker, Donald Kimball 


Lynn 


Phillips 19 


Wallace, Frederic William 


Plainfield, N. J. 


Bishop 14 


West, Harold Albert William 


New York, N. Y. 


Andover 2 


Willard, Charles Hastings 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bartlet 19 


Wood, Cornelius Van Ness 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Bartlet 25 


Wright, Cyrus Gordon 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bishop 11 


Wright, Royal Josiah, Jr. 


Springfield 


Miss Cheever's 



Seniors — 59 



CLASS II— UPPER MIDDLERS 



NAME 

Aguinaldo, Emilio, Jr. 
Bigelow, Victor Stoddard 
Bliss, Charles Lydston 
Blunt, William Williams, Jr. 
Bruce, James Gould 
Bucknam, Charles Clark 
Buttrick, Allan Winfield 
Castleman, Godwin Munn 
Chalker, Richard Bushnell 
Cleaveland, Fred Maurice, Jr. 
Cooke, Hedley Vicars, Jr. 
Cushing, William Harvey 
Dunkle, Robert Johnston, Jr. 
duPont, Edmond 



HOME RESIDENCE 

Manila, P. I. 
Andover 
Newburyport 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Wellesley Hills 



PRESENT ADDRESS 

Day 13 
7 Locke St. 
Draper 5 
Abbot 16 
Bancroft 16 
Bishop 1 



Andover 15 Wolcott Ave. 

Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Day 10 

Old Saybrook, Conn. Taylor 3 

Melrose Bartlet 29 

Orange, N. J. Mr. L. C. Newton's 
Brookline Day 16 

Brookline Bartlet 15 

Philadelphia, Pa. Adams 24 



72 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Ellison, William Partridge 


Newton 


Adams 4 


Epler, Palmer York 


Methuen 


Phillips 9 


Foote, Alfred Sherman 


Washington, D. C. 


Bartlet 11 


Ford, William Raymond Coffin 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Frenyear, John Thomas 


Saybrook, Conn. 


Eaton 2 


Gordon, Alexander Dorward 


Hazardville, Conn. 


Bishop 2 


Harris, Hervie Eugene 


Elmhurst, L. I., N. Y. Day 2 


Heath, Ellis Kendrick 


Worcester 


Bishop 2 


Hobbs, Stillman Moulton 


Hampton, N. H. 


Clark 16 


Holbrook, Gerald Clark 


Red Bank, N. J. 


Af /^M > 

Miss Cheever s 


Jensen, Arthur Eugene 


Gloucester 


Bishop 22 


Johnson, John Crittenden 


Hamburg, N. Y. 


Andover 4 


Jones, William Barksdale, Jr. 


Vaughan, Miss. 


Abbot 7 


Karnheim, Charles Frederick 


Medford 


Bishop 26 


Krech, Gerald 


XT„„., V~~l. XT V 

fv ew York, JS . Y . 


rJartlet 2 


Liebman, Walter Henry, Jr. 


AT XT' 7 AT XT 

New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Little, Joseph Simpson 


XT »; XT T 

Nutley, N.J. 


Bancroft 4 


Lloyd, Charles Disbrow 


Hamsburg, Pa. 


Taylor 2 


Lord, John Anderson, Jr. 


Danvers 


Bishop 29 


McCandless, John Ashley 


AT™.. XT V 

Tsew York, JS . Y . 


Clark 8 


McNeer, Gordon Palmer 


Seward, Alaska 


Bishop 28 


Merrick, Miner William 


Homer, N. Y. 


Clark 17 


Merrill, Frederick Thayer 


Brookline 


Clark 12 


Miller, Randolph Vaniderstine 


Homer, N. Y. 


Miss Carter's 


Moody, Howard Hartwell 


-Kir 7 at T 

Maplewood, N.J. 


Day 21 


Moulton, William Watkins 


or. Louis, Mo. 


Miss Carter's 


Murphy, Charles Barney Gould 


Durham, N. H. 


Bishop 4 


Newman, Frank Watson 


Tunkhannock, Pa. 


Phillips 17 


Newman, Fred Otis 


Tunkhannock, Pa. 


Phillips 17 


Remington, Harry George 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Day 4 


Renouf, Henry Charles 


Andover 


140 Elm St. 


Simonds, Philip Baldwin, Jr. 


Providence, R. I. 


Pemberton 5 


Smith, Russell Train 


Concord 


Adams 23 


Stern, Jesse Myron 


Chestnut Hill 


Bartlet 23 


Treadway, Charles Terry, Jr. 


Bristol, Conn. 


Day 29 


Trevvett, Walter Egan 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Day 4 


Turner, Benner Creswell 


Columbus, Ga. 


Abbot 9 


Vaill, Charles Beecher Holmes 


Winsted, Conn. 


Day 14 


Wasserman, Milton 


Scarsdale, N. Y. 


Phillips 15 


Watson, Louis Henry 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 23 


Wayland-Smith, Robert 


Kenwood, N. Y. 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Welch, Francis William, Jr. 


ML Kisco, N. Y. 


Bishop 24 


Witwer, Mohler Studebaker 


South Bend, Ind. 


Adams 18 



Upper Middlers — 57 



73 



CLASS III— LOWER MIDDLERS 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Allen, George Lockhart 


Ivf n yip h p <iipT 

ATX UflAsfltsOLtsr 


xALlctLLlS Z- 


Asher, Frank Lewis 


TtrPiriltliYip 


Tflvlnr 21 


Basham, Harvey Alonzo, Jr. 


SshntiiYipp Oltl n 


xxULctlllS IX 


Beecher, George Buckingham 


rTiIiQnnrfi (thin 


»Ptf»Q Cf> 1 1 
A cdo" X X 


Brayton, Lawton Slade 


Wall Hinpr 


A nnAUPr 1 
xxXliXLIVCI X 


Brown, Gardner 


TTi'nQnnJp 711 
XX bflolLiJLvGy X 11, 


Tflvlnr 27 


Joryant, xvoDert rJancroit 


(InTnYiPv 
vjui uai&r 


XJctiiHUlL *Z 


Chace, Richard Arnzen 


Tiverton R I 

A I I C / LVJ It y A I < X • 


(^fi rin ati TTmiQP 

V^CAAlAAwAA 11UUI3V 


Chopitea, Jose I. 


//) -777 rt T^PTll 
±J V IllAly x vr 11 


XJcl l L1C L t* 


ClarK, Jay, 3a 


IT' SVTPPtfpT 


A/Ttg RriMiATfc <5 
1VXX O. ilUUtl lo 9 


Cross, Kent Converse 


TVinchcndon 


Bishop 12 


fii.tis "Paul 

v^urtis, ittUi 


JVcllcslsy Hills 


FarrEr 6 


Danforth, Nicholas Williamson 


iSIi/wwj/ nJ 7 
LJUfftfftliy at » u . 


\ n nAVpr ^ 

XX 11 IX i_l V CI %J 


Dickson, John Paul 


A/ n Yt it ip Ispf 


Williams TTrII 

n llllctllXS Hall 


Hiday, Lreorge Altrea 


nJ PlftfPlTilYi HP 


1 la 1 \J.\ Zt 


Jbilariage, Harold JNorton, Jr. 


North nrrrt L T N V 
±y yjr in pur l y ±j . x • y at* i . 


XJlollw LJ XO 


Hi l well, xaul Jvennetn 


C+l PktIPP QtPV 
\JVU (t( CO Its! 


XJloilU LJ A- A' 


r landers, xvennetn 


tVl/i ryphpei p-r 


Ppo CA Q 


roster, .frawara Harris 


A Tin fYlfPT 


Trunin TJnan 


Glazier, Prentiss Cummings 


finrPPTfUYiph Clnnn 

\jrt \s\j IVVUVlslby \J\J HIV* 


Pease 10 


Haskell, Nelson Cary, Jr. 


AjnhcTst 


Woods 7 


Healey, William Thomas 


AilnYiin fin 




Hibbard, Stephen Brace 


Pittsfield 


Williams Hall 


Hicks, Leslie Robert, Jr. 


McItosc Highlands 


Pease 12 


Holt, Reginald Woodbury 


A 7iflry))p/r 


74 Bartlet St. 


Jackson, Edmund Balch 


f^n 7n nn n hp. 


Pemberton 5 


Mott, John Grenville 


Highland PatJc 9 III. 


Bishop 33 


Newcomb, Henry Martyn 


Arlinnfrtr} A7 V 

dll It fly tUfty AT • X • 


AHfims fi 


-reabody, Alfred Horatio rSelo 


fYT r>9 Tw'i n np 


Ranrroft 3 


Posey, Marshall Lyne 


Slmiin (iTriYinp fiJ A 
Kjuui/c xJiu/iyOf at. t/ • 


Adams 20 

X XiACA AAAO ** \J 


xvedpatn, xvobert Lpjonn, Jr. 


Maplcwood, N • «/. 


Eaton 1 


Renouf, Edward Pechmann 


A n/lryijpT 

AX / MAWC'/ 


140 Elm St. 


xvice, hi d ward Archibald 


r r wi/ CA/ rli 


Bishop 28 


Kicnards, rrancis riullard, zd 


JVctuiOTCf Colo* 


Clark 17 


Rogers, John 


TCpriTipfoiiYilf l\^fp. 

Jit '!/(C L/(t/ia, AZA c« 


Phillips 11 


Rossi, Henry 


Lawrence 


Bishop 15 


Schulten, Alexis John, Jr. 


7 .PMI1 QIYlll P fCii 
JljU H lOUVlWy IV(/. 


Tucker 1 


Ol 13 _ 

Snoop, Wilbur lioy 


Northport, L. iV*. F. 


Clark 10 


omitn, Josepn xiaroia 




238 Main St. 


Snprrv TTpnrv NpIsoti Jr 

OpCllJ' j XXCllXj' liClDUllj Wl. 


iVor^A Attleboro 


Taylor 12 


Stebbins, Edwin Allen, Jr. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Andover 6 


Whiting, Richard George 


Winter Hill 


Farrar 4 


Willis, Raymond Smith, Jr. 


Glen Ridge, N. J. Mr. L. C. Newton's 



Lower Middlers — 43 



74 



CLASS IV— JUNIORS 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Alexander, Walter 


Aurora, III. 


Williams Hall 


Alison, John Charles 


New York, N. Y. Mr. L. C. Newton's 


Ames, Edward Winslow, Jr. 


Annapolis, Md. 


Farrar 5 


Barnes, Clarence Alfred, Jr. 


Mansfield 


Pease 9 


Bauer, Byrne Weiller 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Biery, Francis Joseph 


Andover 


41 Salem St. 


Bixler, Henry Elwell 


Lencoes, Bahia, Brazil 


Day 9 


Blanchard, Gerald Geoffrey 


New York, N. Y. 


Churchill 6 


Bodwell, Henry Arnold 


Andover 


31 Morton St. 


Borah, Charles Edward 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


Pease 12 


Brockway, Robert Kingsley 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Bishop 27 


Bryant, John Walden 


West Newton 


Hardy 2 


Buckley, Charles William 


Swampscott 


Chandler House 


Carlin, Alfred William 


Johannesburg, S. Africa Williams Hall 


Chace, Leonard Sanford, Jr. 


Tiverton, R. I. 


Mr. Tower's 


Cochran, William James, Jr. 


Natick 


Taylor 2 


Colby, Charles Howard 


Melrose 


Taylor 18 


Colquhoun, Gordon Lee 


Andover 


38 Chestnut St. 


Connor, Samuel Powers, Jr. 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Cannon House 


Curtis, John Morton 


Wellesley Hills 


Cannon House 


Curtis, William Elroy 


South Orange, N. J. 


Taylor 13 


Davison, Thurlow Weed 


New York, N. Y. 


Bishop 13 


Dobbins, Stanwood Fuller 


Bradford 


Mr. Stott's 


Dorr, Dudley Huntington, Jr. 


Lancaster 


Chandler House 


Downes, Robert Brooks 


Bradford 


Taylor 10 


Drummond, John Landells 


Bronxville, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


English, Benjamin Farren, Jr. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Pemberton 3 


Fisher, Agnew 


Greenwich, Conn. 


W'illiams Hall 


Flowers, Norman Farrand 


Jackson, Mich. 


Adams 17 


Flynn, John Doyle 


Fall River 


Day 15 


Fox, Douglas Claughton 


Plandome, L. I., N. Y. 


Adams 5 


Foxall, Douglas Hanley 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Mr. Stott's 


Fujiyama, Wallace Katsuheko 


Tokio, Japan 


Williams Hall 


Fuller, James Constance 


White Plains, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Graham, James Henry, Jr. 


Torrington, Conn. 


Cannon House 


Ham, Clifford Dudley, Jr. 


Managua, Nicaragua 


Tucker 1 


Harris, James Dexter 


Maiden 


Woods 6 


Hopkins, Eli Whitney Barstow 


East Haddam, Conn. 


Adams 3 


Howarth, Francis George 


Oxford 


Phillips 21 


Huesmann, Louis MacDonald 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Mr. Tower's 


Kaufman, John Loughlin 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Day 5 


Keedy, Allen 


North Andover 


North Andover 


Kemp, Louis Franklin 


Elmhurst, N. Y. 


Phillips 7 


Kenney, William Howland, 2d 


Leominster 


Abbot 17 



75 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Lawton, Walter Kennet 


Chicago, III. 


Mr. Tower's 


Lee, Burton James, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Likly, Richard Henry 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Loveland, Charles Noyes, Jr. 


Wilkes Barre, Pa. 


Farrar 5 


McClellan, Hugh Derby 


Andover 


1 Orchard St. 


Mapes, Charles Francis 


Newburgh, N. Y. 


Chandler House 


Morgan, Thomas Hubbard 


Kittanning, Pa. 


Adams 13 


Mulqueen, Carr 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 1 


Newbold, Haywood 


Colorado Springs, Colo. Bancroft 15 


Newcomb, Wyllys Stetson 


Arlington, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Nichols, Monroe Kimball 


Andover 


25 Central St. 


Norris, Harry Franklin, Jr. 


Staunton, Va. 


Mr. Manning's 


Osborne, Leslie Becker 


Guatemala City, Guatemala 






Williams Hall 


Paine, Ralph Delahaye, Jr. 


Durham, N. H. 


Hardy 3 


Paxton, Worthen 


Washington, Pa. 


Bancroft 10 


Pearce, Eugene Lovick, Jr. 


Clearwater, Fla. 


Adams 10 


Phillips, Hollis Hall 


Andover 


25 Highland Road 


Plum, Stephen Haines, Jr. 


Newark, N. J. 


Mr. Stott's 


Poland, Warren Morrison 


Wakefield 


Williams Hall 


Poor, William George 


West Swanzey, N. H. Tucker 3 


Poore, Charles Morton 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Ridgway, William Combs, Jr. 


Englewood, N. J. 


Williams Hall 


Rogers, Francis Clark 


West Newton 


Adams 17 


Rollins, Richard Russell, Jr. 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Pease 11 


Rylee, Robert Tilmon 


Memphis, Tenn. 


Williams Hall 


Sawyer, Henry Severance 


Dalton 


Williams Hall 


Shelden, Charles Freeman 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Taylor 25 


Sherman, Leonard Dewitt, Jr. 


Andover 


124 Main St. 


Smith, Charles Howard 


Chamber sburg, Pa. 


Taylor 18 


Stafford, Richard Rockwell 


Stamford, Conn. 


Mr. Tower's 


Stein, Alva 


Newton 


Williams Hall 


Stevenson, George Smith 


Winnetka, III. 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Stewart, Donald William 


Chicago, III. 


Williams Hall 


Stout, Stuart 


Fort Scott, Kan. 


Mr. Kelley's 


Sun, Charles Kwang Hwa 


Tientsin, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


Sun, Thomas Kwang Jwe 


Tientsin, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


Tate, Walter Seymour Ballou 


Andover 


135 Main St. 


Taylor, Donald Walker 


Worcester 


Williams Hall 


Tracy, Paul Bernard 


Bristol, Conn. 


W T illiams Hall 


Treadway, Graham Richards 


Bristol, Conn. 


Williams Hall 


Tyler, Warren Perley 


Wakefield 


Williams Hall 


Van Jtiaelen, John rJaptiste, Jr. 


Scarsdale, N. Y. 


Churchill 5 


Varian, John Frederick 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Verigan, Francis 


Hampton, Va. 


Clark 4 



76 



NAME 

Watson, George Landon 
Weeks, Edward Walsh 
Whitham, John Garnett 
Winters, Rand Eddy 
Woodward, William Harwood 
Woolsey, Convers Keith 
Wright, Ansel Duryea 
Yuan, Henry Ke An 
Yuan, William Ke Chiu 



HOME RESIDENCE 

Kokomo, Ind. 
Andover 
Lawrence 
Bay City, Mich. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Aiken, S. C. 
New York, N. Y. 
Tientsin, China 
Tientsin, China 



PRESENT ADDRESS 

Williams Hall 
19 Wolcott Ave. 
Pease 10 
Churchill 2 
Tucker 3 
Williams Hall 
Cannon House 
Williams Hall 
Churchill 3 



Juniors — 97 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT 



CLASS A— SENIORS 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Allen, Daniel 


Cheshire, Conn. 


Adams 16 


Allen, Dell Keller 


Chicago, III. 


Clark 9 


Allen, Robert Gray 


Andover 


Bartlet 28 


Atwood, George Baker 


Ferguson, Mo. 


Bartlet 19 


Babbitt, Howard Carter 


Honolulu, H. T. 


Bartlet 28 


Batchelder, Roger Walker 


North Reading 


Bancroft 7 


Bates, George Warren 


Cohasset 


Bancroft 6 


Bauer, Paul Sherman 


Lynn 


Clement 2 


Beck, Beresford Ellsworth 


Evanston, III. 


Bishop 21 


Boarts, Robert Marsh, Jr. 


Kittanning, Pa. 


Taylor 17 


Booz, Donald Yastine 


Ardmore, Pa. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Brace, Roger Wing 


West Newton 


Phillips 1 


Bradeen, Charles Shaw 


Essex, Conn. 


Eaton 5 


Burr. George Watson 


Old Lyme, Conn. 


Taylor 5 


Carr, Donald Eaton 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Day 32 


Carter, Richard Phillip 


Andover 121 High Plain Road 


Cheney, Laurence Bradford 


Southbridge 


Day 28 


Cheney, Stanley 


Brookline 


Day 11 


Clark, Herbert Sherman, Jr. 


Holyoke 


Bishop 34 


Clark, Ray Butler 


Camden, N. Y. 


Bartlet 25 


Cole, Horace Wellington 


West Newton 


Abbot 6 


Coles, Roswell Strong 


Middletown, Conn. 


Day 2 


Cottle, Edmund Petrie, Jr. 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Creevey, Kennedy 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 12 


Crosby, Willard Barnhart 


Grand Rapids, Mich. Eaton 6 


Crowley, Ralph Manning 


Madison, Wis. 


Eaton 4 


Cummings, Leland Wilson 


Oak Park, IU. 


Andover 2 



77 



NAME 

Cutler, Benjamin Crawford 
Danforth, George Henry, 3d 
Deane, James Brayton 
Deignan, John Eugene 
Donaldson, Malcolm Lincoln 
Edwards, John Handy 
Elmendorf, Duryea Elwell 
Elwell, Richard Derby 
Fabian, Tracy 
Fairback, Elliot 
Ferguson, Oliver Drayton 
Fisk, Burnham Morris 
Foxwell, Richard Strong 
Garfield, Owen Richardson 
Goodman, Joseph, Jr. 
Goodwill, Francis Ormes 
Grady, James Henry 
Gray, Burton Payne 
Gray, Donald McPherson 
Grover, Donald Broughton 
Harris, Albert Spear 
Hartigan, John Glenn 
Hayes, Bartlett Harding, Jr. 
Heilman, Willis Hulings 
Holcomb, Harry Sherman 
Holmes, William Hicks 
Ingalls, Edward 
Ives, Stanley Hoyt 
Kane, Frank Paul 
Kern, James Simon 
Lee, Wilmot Brereton 
Loveman, Adolph Bernard 
Lowell, William Plummer, Jr. 
McDonough, John Martin 
Mahoney, Charles Daniel 
Mason, Edward Gay 
Merrick, Lathrop Bennett 
Miller, Noel Henry 
Moon, James Southworth 
Munger, John Dudley 
Munro, Seymour Sherwood 
Noble, Everett Stearns 
Paget, Harold Alan 
Philbrick, Lawrence Scribner 
Phillipps, Henry Godfrey, Jr. 



HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Andover 


Abbot 15 


Summit, N. J. 


Andover 1 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Eaton 6 


East Orange, N. J. 


Taylor 23 


Lincoln 


Miss Carter's 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Miss Carter's 


Spokane, Wash. 


Clark 8 


New York, N.Y. 


Day 33 


New Haven, Conn. 


Adams 16 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Adams 11 


Paducah, Ky. 


Andover 6 


Oak Park, 111. 


Miss Carter's 


Camden, Me. 


Abbot 18 


Middleboro 


Phillips 9 


Hartford, Conn. 


Draper 5 


Jamestown, N. Y. 


Abbot 13 


Fargo, N. D. 


Day 33 


Newton Centre 


Clement 3 


Newton Centre 


Abbot 17 


Petersham 


Bartlet 3 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 7 


Chicago, III. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Andover 


Phillips St. 


Kittanning, Pa. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Brookline 


Chandler House 


Wyoming, N. J. 


Day 6 


Hartford, Conn. 


Williams Hall 


New York, N. Y. 


Bancroft 5 


Radnor, Pa. 


Clark 13 


Middletown, Pa. 


Day 3 


Ridgefield, Conn. 


Phillips 6 


Birmingham, Ala. 


Clark 7 


Newburyport Mrs. Wainwright's 


Fort Smith, Ark. 


Clark 15 


Lawrence 


Phillips 8 


Glencoe, III. 


Abbot 6 


Andover 


Lowell St. 


Racine, Wis. 


Bishop 25 


Cranford, N. J. 


Bancroft 12 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Phillips 13 


Camillus, N. Y. 


Day 34 


Denver, Colo. 


Taylor 10 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 12 


Melrose 


Eaton 4 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Clark 11 



78 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Pickering, Hamilton Reeve 


East Orange, N. J. 


Draper 3 


Preston, Elwyn Greeley, Jr. 


Lexington 


Day 35 


Quarrier, Archie Monroe 


Short Hills, N. J. 


Bartlet 9 


Reed, Joseph Verner 


Denver, Colo. 


Phillips 13 


Reynolds, Paul Revere, Jr. 


Scarsdale, N. Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


Rindlaub, Bruce Douglas 


Fargo, N. D. 


Day 17 


Ripley, Douglas 


Flushing, N. Y. 


Pemberton 6 


Rose, Sayre Broadhead 


Glastonbury, Conn. 


Andover 9 


Sayles, Alexander 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 11 


Seward, Paul Sanford 


Guilford, Conn. 


Bishop 6 


Simonson, Cortelyou Willia 


West New Brighton 


, S. I., N. Y. 






Day 23 


Smith, Dudley Tenney 


Montclair, N. J. 


Bancroft 15 


Smith, John Wendell 


Barre, Vt. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Spencer, Donald 


Cambridge 


Bartlet 3 


Stahl, Everett Howard 


Berlin, N. H. 


Bartlet 27 


Stevens, Ralph Cuyler, Jr. 


Glen Ridge, N. J. 


Bishop 21 


Stockder, Robert Maxwell 


Hartford, Conn. 


Bancroft 12 


Taylor, George Chadbourne, Jr. 


Pelham, N. Y. 


Bartlet 7 


Thomas, Sydney Fredrick 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Bancroft 11 


Tracy, Raymond Everett 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Turner, Smith Davison, Jr. 


Parkersburg, W. Va. Mrs. Gardner's 


Wadhams, Gordon Butler 


Westhampton Beach, L. I., N. Y. 






Clark 14 


Walworth, William McAlpine 


Andover 


8 Locke St. 


Wattles, Frank Erbin, Jr.* 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


White, James Mattocks 


Brookline 


Bartlet 26 


White, Russell, Jr. 


Cambridge 


Adams 7 


Wieting, Harry Nye, Jr. 


Watertown, N. Y. 


Adams 9 


W T ilmot, Nelson Frank 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Bishop 35 


Woodruff, Gerald Beckley 


Southington, Conn. 


Clark 3 


Wylie, Sidney Hopkins 


Torrington, Conn. 


Bartletl3 


Seniors — 102 




CLASS B- 


UPPER MIDDLERS 


NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Adams, John Durrell 


Wellesley Hills 


Bancroft 10 


Alcaide, Otto Antonio 


Brookline 


Bishop 5 


Alger, Russell Alexander, 3d 


Detroit, Mich. 


Bishop 17 


Allen, Richard Bedford 


Andover 


Highland Wayside 


Allis, Jairus Searle Hurlbut 


Springfield 


Clement 6 


Anderson, Robert Palmer 


Noank, Conn. 


Phillips 22 


Avery, Frederic Mercer 


Peoria, III. 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Babson, George Jay, Jr. 


Leesburg, Va. 


Phillips 19 



79 



NAME 

Bell, James Ford, Jr. 
Bennett, Meridan Hunt 
Birch, William Dunham 
Blanchard, Albert Cook 
Boardman, William Edward 
Bonney, Orvis W r eston 
Booth, Waller Beall, Jr. 
Bradeen, Frederick Barton, Jr. 
Bradley, Walter Peters 
Brown, Gordon Kenneth 
Capra, Pietro Jerry 
Carlton, Frank Tyler 
Carpenter, John Hart 
Chapman, Horatio Campbell 
Cookman, Robert Rollen, Jr. 
Cory, John Aumock 
Cox, Gardner 
Dolman, John Elbert, Jr. 
Dove, Percival, Jr. 
Driscoll, Anthony Aloysius 
Dunsford, Bevan 
Ely, John Wilson 
Engstrum, Frederick 
Fletcher, George Alfred, 2d 
Flint, Thomas 
Foote, William Jenkins 
Gay, William Campbell 
Gill, Stanley 

Goldberg, Bernard Jasper 
Gordon, Lewis Henderson 
Gray, Edward LeBreton 
Greene, Roger Denise 
Haight, Eric Hall 
Hall, Jack Lowell 
Hamilton, Wilson 
Hammett, Edward, 3d 
Hammond, Seymour Chamberlain 
Harris, Byron Douglas 
Harris, Herbert Donald 
Heald, William Edward 
Hitchcock, Edson Beckwith 
Hocking, Richard Boyle O'Reilly 
Hodges, Richard Burt 
Holt, John Eliot 
Hutchinson, William Arnold 



HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Bancroft 11 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


£>artiet lo 


Dovev, N. J. 


v^iement lo 


Bangor, Me. 


Abbot 4 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


rSatri, me. 


Element o 


Owensboro, Ky. 


l^larK lx 


Essex, Conn. 


Xiaton o 


Houston, Texas 


xayior xo 


T7- AT TT 

Keene, i\. U. 


Bishop 4 


Englewood, N. J. 


Jbaton r 


Andover 


dry r„„4.. n l C4- 

0/ L/entrai ot. 


Salem, Ohio 


uay o 


Saybrook, Conn. 


xJartiet o 


Fitchburg 


Jt>artiet x» 


Erieue, iv . j . 


Draper 6 


Cambridge 


Miss ximcncline s 


ot. Joseph, mo. 


rSisnop 32 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Adams 11 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Chelmsford 


ADDOt 


Newark, N.J. 


Pemberton 1 


Washington, D. C. 


Miss Foster's 


Haverford, Pa. 


xjancroit 6 


Boston 


layior sc 


New Haven, Conn. 


Hardy 5 


DTOOKiyn, ±\ . i . 


xUUIipS 156 


tiaruana, v i. 


L/iarK o 


is ew I OTK, 1\ . I . 


layior e * 


Flushing, N. Y. 


Dancroit lo 


iwcnesier, i\ . i . 


Draper 1 


Denver, Colo. 


xulUipS 56 


Muskegon, Mich. 


uay lo 


w esijieia 


Uaiy 14 


Caledonia, N. Y. 


rJisnop i» 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 14 


Spokane, Wash. 


Taylor 14 


Johannesburg, S. Africa Bancroft 9 


Johannesburg, S. Africa Bancroft 9 


Methuen 


Day 35 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Miss Hinchcliffe's 


Cambridge 


Adams 4 


Ben Avon, Pa. 


Abbot 4 


New York, N. Y. 


Clark 3 


Pepperell 


Clement 12 



80 



NAME 

Johnstone, Vanderburgh 
Jones, Herbert Norman 
Kellogg, James Harrington 
Kern, Alfred Dean 
Kopetzky, Karl Abraham 
Lin, Frank Ching Fan 
Look, Allen MacMartin 
Lord, Richard Noel 
Lough, Edwin Bailey 
McClellan, John 
McComb, Malcolm Stuart 
McCord, Donald Nelson 
McKee, William Francis 
MacKinnon, Joseph Ayer 
Matalene, Eugene Manuel 
Matalene, Henry William, Jr. 
May, Thayer Thomas 
Mayers, Lloyd Chandler 
Mercer, Aymer Turnbull 
Mills, Hiram Francis 
Moore, Robert Nelson 
Perry, George Vincent 
Phillips, Montague Burrell 
Pickering, Reynale Timothy 
Pratt, Elliot Sterling 
Quarrier, Sidney Sayre 
Remick, Jerome Hosmer, Jr. 
Rhines, Paul Fairbanks 
Richardson, Paul Harvey 
Robison, Sanford Harding 
Ryan, William Mathew, Jr. 
Sanford, Durston 
Scaife, James Verner, Jr. 
Sheh, Quincey Queen Shan 
Shipman, Thomas Leffingwell 
Smith, Gordon Arthur 
Strickland, William Alexander 
Strong, Selden 
Swartz, Benjamin Kinsell 
Treat, Robert Belden, Jr. 
Tsai, Kuo Fong 
Tutein, Ernest Arthur, Jr. 
Villalon, Augusto 
Vose, Edward Rich 
Waldo, Gentry Chilton 



HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Pasadena, Calif. 


Bartlet 24 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Phillips 8 


Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 


Day 10 


Portland, Me. 


T~> n . Pi i j^f 

Joancroit 17 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 4 


Tientsin, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


West Tisbury 


Adams 3 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


T% 77 IT" \7 T7" 

Pelham Manor, N. Y. 


Bishop 20 


W ooastock, Conn. 


Clement 7 


New York, N. Y, 


~\/r _ tt*ii'_ 

Mrs. Hill s 


Middletown, Pa. 


Day 3 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Bishop 36 


CM L „• /~VL ' 

shanghai, China 


Clark 14 


Newark, N. J. 


Day 8 


XT ._ T. XT T 

Newark, N.J. 


Day 8 


Memphis, lenn. 


Draper 3 


Montclair, N.J. 


Day 14 


Andover 


Day 20 


TTT Vi J? -7 J 17 j. 

Waitsjield, Vt. 


Pemberton 2 


Chicago, 111. 


Clark 9 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Peterborough, N. H. 


Bancroft 17 


East Orange, N. J. 


Draper 3 


Lowell 


Adams 15 


Cl 7 # TT * 7 7 AT T 

Short Hills, N. J. 


Bartlet 9 


Detroit, Mich. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


rvatertown, iV. Jr. 


Mr. Kelley s 


Middleton 


Day 22 


Kansas City, Mo. 


•» IT TT 1 J. » 

Mrs. Holt s 


Chicago, III. 


Bishop 27 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Mr. Johnson's 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Mr. Trott's 


Tientsin, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


Andover 


Day 27 


Omaha, Neb. Mrs. Wainwright's 


Lawrence 


Phillips 20 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Mr. Trott's 


Berkeley, Calif. 


Bishop 3 


Winchester 


Churchill 5 


Tientsin, China 


Abbot 7 


Winchester 


Clement 1 


Havana, Cuba 


Mr. Johnson's 


East Eddington, Me. 


Day 12 


Omaha, Neb. 


Day 27 



81 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Walker, James 


East Orange, N.J. 


Clark 12 


Watson, John Cairns 


Steubenville, Ohio 


Draper 1 


Weaver, Gordon Read 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Churchill 2 


Westcott, John McMahon, 2d 


Springfield, Ohio 


Taylor 11 


W T ienecke, Louie Gustave 


Tulsa, Okla. 


Draper 2 


Wilder, William Charles 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Wilkinson, Frank Albert 


Meihuen 


Clark 16 


Wolfe, Edwin Moulton 


Coshocton, Ohio 


Bartlet 24 


Wright, Charles Blossom 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Clement 8 


Wyer, Richard Farrar 


Fort Sheridan, III. 


ADDOt ID 


Wylie, Donald Penniman 


Lynnfield Centre 


Churchill 7 


Upper Middlers — 109 




CLASS C- 


-LOWER MIDDLERS 




NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Abernathy, James Logan 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Phillips 8 


Appelman, Hiram Nevins 


Manchester, N. H. 


Mr. Stott's 


Austin, Richard Coffin 


Nantucket 


Clement 11 


Baker-Carr, John D'Arcy 


Nairobi, E. Africa 


Taylor 8 


Barnes, Melvin Bunker 


Andover Sunset Rock Road 


Bastedo, Norrie Philip 


New York, N. Y. 


Clement 4 


Beardsley, W T alter Raper 


Elkhart, Ind. 


Cannon House 


Bishop, Stephen Hunter 


Newton Centre 


Abbot 15 


Bixler, Paul Edwin 


Lengoes, Bahia, Brazil 


Day 9 


Blank, Ralph Edward 


Glen Ridge, N. J. 


Taylor 16 


Bliss, Laurence Thornton, Jr. 


Wilmington, Del. 


Mr. Tower's 


Bliss, Thorndike Bruce 


Dancers 


Adams 9 


Blunt, Charles Nash 


Port Huron, Mich. 


Adams 10 


Booth, Albert Washington 


Methuen 


Day 22 


Borg, Cecil 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 6 


Bouma, Gysbert K. 


Paterson, N. J. 


Woods 8 


Buckley, Arthur Jerome 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Burton, Malcolm King 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Clement 9 


Burton, Myron Simmons 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Clark 16 


Bush, Kimberly 


Port Chester, N. Y. 


Adams 22 


Bush, William Brainard 


Port Chester, N. Y. 


Adams 22 


Buss, Eugene Rowell, Jr. 


Wyoming, Ohio 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Campopiano, Fred 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Card, Joseph Phelps 


Highland Park, III. 


Bartlet 8 


Carter, Richard Augustine, Jr. 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Cary, John Reeder 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Case, John McDougall 


Bronxville, N. Y. 


Tucker 2 


Cheney, Gilbert Cunningham 


Southbridge 


Day 28 



82 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Christie, Harry Francis 


Laurence 


Mrs. Hill's 


Chute, Edward Ensley 


Lowell 


Pemberton 1 


Cornish, Charles Hubbard 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Day 21 


Curtis, William Pitkin 


Newton Centre 


Adams 13 


Dalton, William John 


Andover 


64 Chestnut St. 


Dickerman, William Carter, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 1 


Donovan, Louis McCormick 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Dunsford, Harold 


Chelmsford 


Phillips 12 


Earle, Victor Montague, Jr. 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Bancroft 18 


Edson, Edward Gilroy, Jr. 


Beaumont, Texas 


Bancroft 18 


Flynn, Grant Yetman 


Marianao, Cuba 


Adams 8 


Foster, Willard R S 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Cannon House 


Fujiyama, Motohiko 


Tokio, Japan 


Adams 18 


Gilchrist, Frank William 


Laurel^ Miss. 


Bartlet 20 


Green, John Harrington 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Wainwright's 


Grinnell, Richard Clark 


Mount Vernon, N. Y. Day 20 


Hamilton, Robert Chandler 


East Orange, N. J. 


Adams 21 


Harriman, Lawrence Manning 


North Wilmington 


Abbot 5 


Henry, Stuart Compton 


Andover 


29 Central St. 


Hogue, Oliver Driscoll, Jr. 


Brookline 


Woods 5 


Howell, Charles Morgan, Jr. 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Taylor 25 


James, William Gilbert 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


Keany, Matthew 


Andover 


32 Morton St. 


Kohler, Carl James 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


Day 36 


Larsen, George Harriman 


Brookline 


Bancroft 5 


Lauchheimer, Alan 


Far Rockaway, L. I. 


, N. Y. Taylor 9 


Layton, Robert Reese, Jr. 


Bridgeville, Del. 


Bishop 16 


Lee, Tsu Yung 


Peking, China 


Clement 5 


Lloyd, Herbert Marshall, 2d 


Montclair, N. J. 


Mrs. Gardner's 


Lockett, John 


Winnetka, III. 


Mr. Stott's 


Look, Frank Byron 


West Tisbury 


Adams 3 


McKinlay, Robert Emmons 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Churchill 4 


Mdivani, David 


TiMs, Republic of Georgia Taylor 22 


Mdivani, Serge 


Tiflis, Republic of Georgia Day 1 


Miller, Richard Dunbar 


Racine, Wis. 


Adams 2 


Minton, Stuart 


New York, N. Y. 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Morgan, David Byrd 


Tulsa, Okla. 


Draper 2 


Mumby, George Ernest 


Palmyra, N. Y. 


Taylor 24 


Mumby, Kenneth James 


Palmyra, N. Y. 


Taylor 24 


O'Connell, Clinton Paul 


Hackensack, N. J. 


Abbot 7 


Onthank, Curtis Heath 


Fitchburg 


Day 26 


Owl, Frell McDonald 


Cherokee, N. C. 


Pemberton 2 


Parker, Edward Linne 


San Francisco, Calif 


Miss Foster's 


Peierls, Edgar Siegfried 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 31 


Perkins, j,Carleton|Heil 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Clark 2 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Peters, John Lovett 


East Holliston 


Clement 11 


Petze, Edwardes Sinclair 


Wilmington, Del. 


Taylor 15 


Ransom, Henry Edward MacDonald Gould 






Toronto, Ont., Can. 


Adams 17 


Reed, Laurence Wonson 


Andover 


A J — 

Andover 


Reed, Morris Houghton, Jr. 


or. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 23 


Remhart, Alan David 


Brookline 


Day 25 


Biggs, lheodore Scott 


TIT 1- ' t\ sy 

Washington, D. C. 


Woods 6 


Rosenbaum, Emanuel Frank, Jr. 


AT- TT 7 AT TT 

New York, N. Y. 


Adams 14 


Kowe, bargent Stephen 


TIT IjI 

Waltham 


Taylor 26 


T% X " XT* 1 1 

Rugee, Louis Nickel 


South Bend, Ind. 


Til- ' 11 '_ n 

Phillips 2 


Ryan, James Doyle 


Chicago, III. 


Day 1 


Samper, Ernesto 


Bogota, Colombia, b. A. 


Adams 8 


Sanborn, George Knight 


Andover 


5 Locke St. 


baniord, Charles Hamilton, Jr. 


O AT TT 

Syracuse, N. Y. 


Bishop 27 


Sawyer, Charles Henry 


A J 

Andover 


T>* 1 „ O 

Bishop 8 


bchulte, Arthur David 


AT TT I AT TT 

New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 9 


Sheldon, Joel Craik 


Columbia, Tenn. 


Adams 21 


Shepard, Francis Guernsey 


South Orange, N. J. 


Farrar 4 


Sinclair, Walter Baldwin 


/*» T IT 1 

Omaha, Neb. 


Clark 2 


Skinner, Morris Phillips 


l/_ J AT T 

Madison, N.J. 


Bishop 29 


Cl 1_ T> T? J 1 

Slagle, Roy Edward 


Lima, Ohio 


Clark 5 


O "il- XT' T 

Smith, Keith, Jr. 


T ' J TTi L 

Lmwood, Utah 


Bishop 8 


Smith, Rowland Howard 


Farmington, Me. 


Bishop 3 


Smith, Samuel Bailey, 2d 


T * AT TT 

Laconia, N. H. 


Day 27 


Spear, Arthur Prince, Jr. 


Brookline 


Tucker 5 


Stephens, William 


Plymouth 


Taylor 17 


Oi . T 1_ ATT 

Stevens, John Werner 


Mount Vernon, N. Y. 


Tucker 4 


Stiles, Ezra Martin 


Paterson, N. J. 


Tl 1 L -1 

Pemberton 1 


Stone, Knowlton Davies 


Andover 


1 T 1 C?j. 

1 Locke St. 


Thorn, Charles Norman, Jr. 


Westfield, N. J. 


Bancroft 11 


Toner, Williams McCulloch 


Anderson, Ind. 


Bartlet 20 


1 raver, Wallace Deitz 


AT„„_ TT 1. AT TT 

New York, N . i . 


Bishop 15 


Treat, Franklm Graves 


Winchester 


TT J -1 

Hardy 1 


lutein, Richard Allen 


TTT ' 7. l - 

Winchester 


Taylor 20 


Tweedy, Laurance, Jr. 


Cl jL /l AT T 

South Orange, N. J. 


Clark 13 


TT J 1 • 1 . -n 1 ' 1 T 

Vanderschmidt, George Frederick, Jr. 


Leavenworth, Kan. 


Eaton 3 


TXT Jl- YXT'll* TT J T 

Wadhams, William Henderson, Jr. 


AT TT 1. AT TT 

New York, N. Y. 


Adams 19 


vvaiKer, otougnioii 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 16 


Ward, Thomas, 2d 


Fort Leavenworth, Kans. 


Andover 6 


Watson, Charles, 3d 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Day 16 


Watson, George Clarke 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 


L til 1 cLL V 


Watters, Kenneth Wallace, Jr. 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Taylor 28 


Wells, Louis Badger 


Bryn Mawr, Pa. 


Phillips 14 


Wester, Frederick 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Taylor 3 



84 



NAME 

Wilder, Stanley Kendall 
Wingate, Frank Poucher 
Wood, Robert Julian 
Woods, George Edward, Jr. 
Wright, John Patterson 



HOME RESIDENCE 

New York, N. Y. 
Arlington, N. J. 
Decatur, III. 
Astoria, L. L, N. Y. 
Keene, N. H. 



PRESENT ADDRESS 

Mrs. Roberts's 
Bishop 23 
Taylor 19 
Mrs. Jackson's 
Mr. Johnson's 



Lower Middlers — 122 



\ 



85 



CLASSIFICATION 



Classical Department — 

Class I — Seniors 59 

Class II — Upper Middlers 57 

Class III — Lower Middlers 43 

— 159 

Class IV — Juniors 97 

Scientific Department — 

Class A — Seniors 102 

Class B — Upper Middlers 109 

Class C — Lower Middlers 122 



333 

589 



REPRESENTATION 



Massachusetts 177 

New York 112 

New Jersey 46 

Connecticut 39 

Pennsylvania 25 

Illinois 22 

Missouri 13 

New Hampshire 11 

Michigan 10 

Ohio 9 

Maine 7 

Minnesota 7 

Indiana 6 

Wisconsin 6 

California 5 

Colorado 5 

Oklahoma 5 

District of Columbia 4 

Delaware 4 

Kentucky 4 

Vermont 4 

Virginia 4 

Kansas 3 

Nebraska 3 

North Dakota 3 

Rhode Island 3 

Tennessee 3 

Georgia 2 

Mississippi 2 

Texas 2 



Washington 2 

Alabama l 

Arkansas l 

Arizona 1 

North Carolina 1 

South Carolina 1 

Florida} 1 

Iowa 1 

Maryland] l 

Oregon jj l 

Utah 1 

West Virginia 1 

Alaska 1 



China 9 

South Africa 3 

Brazil 2 

Cuba 2 

Republic of Georgia 2 

Guatemala 2 

Japan 2 



British East Africa 1 

Canada 1 

Colombia, S. A. 1 

Hawaiian Territory 1 

Nicaragua l 

Peru 1 

Philippine Islands 1 

Syria 1 

Total 589 



86 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Frederic C. Walcott, 1887 

George A. Strong, 1866 
Edward C. Smith, 1871 
Thomas B. Pollard, 1881 
George H. Danforth, 1886 
Winfred H. Babbitt, 1891 
Frederic W. Allen, 1896 
Edward W. Campion, 1901 

George T. Eaton, 1873 

Frederick E. Newton, 1893 

George F. French, 1897 



PRESIDENT 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



STATISTICAL SECRETARY 



SECRETARY 



TREASURER 



New York, N. Y. 

Plainfield, N. J. 
St. Albans, Vt. 
Quincy 

Summit, N. J. 
Honolulu, H. T. 
New York, N. Y. 
Columbus, Ohio 

Andover 

Andover 

Andover 



Meetings, with a reception and dinner, are held at Andover each year in 
connection with the graduation exercises. The date for 1922 will be June 16. 
It is desired that correspondence regarding membership and information 
concerning past members of the Academy be sent to the Statistical Secretary. 



BOSTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Desmond FitzGerald, 1863 
George L. Huntress, 1866 
Nathaniel Stevens, 1876 
Dr. Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 
Arthur J. Selfridge, 1881 



PRESIDENT 

Philip Loring Reed, 1902 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 

William B. Higgins 1914 



Hobart Ames, 1883 
Selden W. Tyler, 1891 
Stephen E. Young, 1894 
Samuel A. F. Ely, 1911 
Van Zandt Stone, 1912 



87 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 Stephen E. Young, 1894 

Fred B, Lund, 1884 William F. Merrill, 1895 

*Joseph W. Lund, 1886 Arthur Drinkwater, 1896 

Elias B. Bishop, 1889 Philip W. Thomson, 1898 

Henry W. Beal, 1893 Joseph S. Seabury, 1900 

Raymond M. Crosby, 1893 Howard M. Bartlett, 1902 

Brewer Eddy, 1894 F. Abbot Goodhue, 1902 

Frederick B. Greenhalge, 1894 Philip L. Reed, 1902 
Robert T. Fisher, 1906 



CHICAGO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

I. Newton Perry, 1905 Henry A. Gardner, Jr., 1901 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Raymond F. Snell, 1914, 6 North Michigan Avenue 

DIRECTORS 

Robert Stevenson, Jr., 1896 Alexander L. Jackson, 1910 

Frank S. Porter, 1896 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

S. Lewis Smith, 1885 Charles A. Otis, 1888 



DETROIT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

William T. Barbour, 1896 Lawrence K. Butler, 1897 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Kenneth L. Moore, 1910; 169 Van Dyke Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Burns Henry, 1896 C. Hayward Murphy, 1902 

Steuart L. Pittman, 1908 Kenneth L. Moore, 1910 



NEW JERSEY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT SECRETARY 

Forrest F. Dryden, 1889 Albert Frey, 1881; 331 South Orange Ave. 

Newark 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Decker, 1910 Allan M. Hirsh, 1898 

Kinsley Twining, 1897 

88 



NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Francis R. Appleton, 1871 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Tracy H. Harris, 1882 Oliver G. Jennings, 1883 

SECRETARY 

Frank H. Simmons, 1894; 110 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. 

TREASURER 

Frank Dale Warren, 1879; 225 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Henry J. Fisher, 1892 James L. Mills, 1897 

G. Ernest Merriam, 1892 Fred S. Bale, 1902 

F. Maurice Newton, 1895 Douglas H. Cooke, 1903 
Herbert H. Ramsay, 1905 



NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT « VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred E. W 7 eyerhaeuser, 1892 John Crosby, 1888 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Edwin White, 1902; 93 East 4th Street, St. Paul, Minn. 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Joseph W. Lucas, 1885 Henry N. Merritt, 1908 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Horace 0. Wells, 1892; Pine Street, west of Broad, Peirce School 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Walter L. Murphy, 1868 Laurence T. Bliss, 1891 

George L. Herrick, 1869 Harry B. Hickman, 1894 

Seneca Egbert, 1880 William H. McCarthy, 1907 

Herman V. Ames, 1884 Langdon W. Clark, 1914 

Dr. Wm. S. Wadsworth, 1887 Sydney Thayer, Jr., 1915 



S9 



PITTSBURGH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Southard Hay, 1898 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

M. B. Suydam, 1896 

SECRETARY 

James J. Brainard, 1899; 1363 Shady Ave. 

TREASURER 

Chauncey O'Neill, 1900 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. W. Burdick, 1898, Chairman 
G. B. Preston, 1877 
E. H. Brainard, 1888 
C. E. Beeson, 1890 

T. M. Jones, 3d, 1917 



Clinton L. Childs, 1898 
Turner D. Moorehead, 1906 
F. T. Hogg, 1913 
J. B. Blair, 1916 



ST. LOUIS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Sidney R. Overall, 1903; Federal Reserve Bank Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

James E. Allison, 1885 A. Linn Bostwick, 1904 

Walter C. Taylor, 1885 Samuel N. Holliday, 1904 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Major Marlborough Churchill, 1896 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Charles Sheldon, 1887 W. D. Wilcox, 1889 

Ord Preston, 1894 

TREASURER 

Duer McLanahan, 1917 
90 



SECRETARY 

Robert C. Dove, 1907; Shoreham Hotel 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Hon. Richard Wayne Parker, 1864 John A. Mcllhenny, 1888 

Irving H. Dunlap, 1881 Robert S. Hume, 1894 

Henry S. Graves, 1888 Murray A. Cobb, 1899 

A. Britton Browne, 1906 



OMAHA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Charles E. Metz, 1911 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Ralph Peters, 1911 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

John H. Caldwell, 1908; U. S. Trust Co. 



91 



INDEX 



subject Page 

Absences • . . . 23 

Academy 

Constitution 10-15 

History 10-15 

Location 15 

Administration Offices 32 

Admission Requirements 17-20 

Algebra 50 

Alumni Association 87 

Athletic fee 25 

Athletic grounds 33 

Bible 50 

Board 27 

Dining Hall 

Private Houses 

Boston Alumni Association 87 

Breakage Deposit 24 

Chapel 32 

Chemistry 52 

Chicago Alumni Assocaition ,88 

Classification 84 

Class Officers 22 

Cleveland Alumni Association 88 

Course of Study 41-43 

Cum Laude 66 

Curriculum 41-43 

Detroit Alumni Association 88 

Dining Hall 27 

Diploma Requirements 21 

Dormitories 29-31 

Faculty Houses 29 

Rents 25-27 



92 



Subject Page 

Scholarship Rooms . 34 

Williams Hall (for young boys) .... 28 

Drawing 58 

English 42 

English Bible 50 

Entrance Examinations 21 

Entrance Examination Requirements 17-18 

Excuses, Out-of-Town 23 

Expenses 24-26 

Faculty 6-7 

Fees, Athletic and Infirmary 25 

Founders of Phillips Academy 4 

French 45 

Furniture in Rooms 26 

Geography 52 

Geometry 51 

Graduation Fee 24 

Greek 44 

Gymnasium 32 

History of Phillips Academy 10-15 

Honor Students (1920-1921) 72-86 

Infirmary 32 

Infirmary Rates 25 

Latin 44 

List of Students 1921-22 . 69-83 

Mechanical Drawing 52 

Music 54 

New Jersey Alumni Association 88 

New York Alumni Association . . 89 

Northwestern Alumni Association ... 89 

93 



Subject Page 

Peabody House 31 

Philadelphia Alumni Association ... 89 

Phillips Academy 10-15 

Its Origin 

Constitution 

Phillips Inn 32 

Philosophy 55 

Physical Training 53 

Physics 52 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association 90 

Preachers 9 

Principals 4 

Prizes 56-60 

Prizes Awarded 1921 61-62 

Public Speaking 49 

Recitation Buildings 31 

Religious Exercises 23 

Representation 84 

Scholarship Aid 34 

Self-Help 34 
Special Room-Scholarships 27 

Scholarship Funds 34-39 

Scholarship Honors 64 

Scholarship Rooms 34 

Senior Honors 65 

Spanish 47 

St. Louis Alumni Association 90 

Students, List 1921-22 69-83 

Swimming Pool 32 

Testimonials 17 

Trigonometry 51 

Trustees 5 

Washington Alumni Association 90 

Williams Hall 

Dormitory for Young Boys 28 

94 



CATALOGUE 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIFTH YEAR 



April, 1923 




Andover, Massachusetts 
THE ANDOVER PRESS 
1923 



1923 



1923 



1924 



1924 



JANUARY 

S ! M T 



14 15 
21 22 



9 10 

16117 
23 24 
30 31 



12 1 13 
19 20 

26 2' 



FEBRUARY 



51 6! 7 3 
12 13,14 15 
19 20|21 22 
26 27128 .. 



21 8 
»|10 
16|l 
23 24 



6! 7 8 
13 14 15 

20,21 22 
27 28 29 



21 3 
9 10 
16ll7 
28124 
30 31 



APRIL 



31 4j 5 6 
10 11 12 13 

17 18 1 19 20 
24 25 26 27 



MAY 



••I 1! 2 
7 Hi 9 10 
13 14 15 16 

20 21122 23 
27 : 28, 29 '30 



41 5 
11 12 
18 19 

25 26 



4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 

17 18 19i20 21 
2.". 26 ,27 28 



1| 2 
8| 9 
15 16 
22 23 
29 30 



s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


2d 


2] 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




28 


29 


30 


31 























AUGUST 



5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 



••I lj 2 i 3| < 
7 8 9 10 ! I 
14115 16 17|lfc 
21 1 22 23(24 1 2S 
28,29 301311.. 



SEPTEMBER 



3 4! 5 6 7 
10 11112 13 14:15 
1718 19 20 21 22 
24:25 26 27 28 29 



14 15 

21 122 
28:29 



21 3 



4 


5 


6 


11 


12 


13 


18 


19 


20 


25 


26 


27 









NOVEMBER 



4 5 

11 12 

18! 19 
25 26 



..I..I II 2 
6 7l 8 9 
13 14 1 15 16 
20 21 22 23 
27 28 29 30 



DECEMBER 



3 4 si 6: 7 8 
lo|ll|12 13 14H5 
17|18jl9i20!21 22 
24;25 26 27128 29 



JANUARY 



s 


M 


T 


W 




F 


S 






1 


2 


1 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 



















FEBRUARY 













2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14ll5 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 '22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 













1 


2 


8 


4 


6 


6 7 


8 




10 


11 


12 


18 14 


15 


16 


17 


13 


19 


20 21 


•j'Z 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 28 


29 


30 


31 























1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


•20 


21 


22 


28 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 
















MAY 












1 


2 


8 


1 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1! 


12 


13 


14 


IE 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


28 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






JUNE 


1 


2 


8 


4 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


A 


18 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 
















I 





S M T!W T F S 



6 7 
13 14 

20 21 
27128 



3 4 
10 11 

17il8 
24 25 
31 .. 



20 21 
27 



SEPTEMBER 





2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


■ill 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


23,29 


30 





















5 6 

12ll8 
19! 20 
26127 





1 


2 




7 


8 


9 


10 


14 


15 


16 


17 


21. 




28 


24 


28 


29 


80 


81 



NOVEMBER 













1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


I 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 

















DECEMBER 




1 


9 


8 


41 5 


6 




8 





10 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 


K 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 


28 


29 


?,C, 


81 







CALENDAR 



1923 

January 8 Monday, 845 p.m. 

March 22 Thursday, 12 noon 

Easter Recess — 1 
April 3 Tuesday, 845 p.m. 

June I If. Thursday noon 

June 15 Friday 

June 18 to 23 Monday to Saturday 

June 19 and 20 Tuesday and Wednesday 



June 23 

September 11 
September 12 
September 13 
December 19 



Saturday 



Tuesday, 9 a.m. 

Wednesday, 745 a.m. 

Thursday, 7.^5 a.m. 

Wednesday noon 

Christmas Vacation 



Second term begins 
Second term ends 
i Days 

Third term begins 

Recitations close for two lower 

classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board Exam- 
inations 

School entrance examinations in 
Andover, New York City, and 
Chicago 

Third term ends for two, upper 
classes 



Chapel followed by entrance 

examinations 
Fall term begins for the two 

lower classes 
Fall term begins for the two 

upper classes 
First term ends 
- 19 Days 



January 7 
March 28 

April 7 
June 12 

June 13 
June 16-21 



1924 

Monday, 845 p.m. 
Friday noon 

Easter Recess - 
Monday, 8.15 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



June 17 and 18 Tuesday and Wednesday 
June 21 Saturday 



Second term begins 
Second term ends 
10 Days 
Third term begins 
Recitations close for Lhc two 

lower classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board Exam- 
inations. 

School entrance examinations 
in Andover, New York City, 
and Chicago 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



3 



FOUNDERS 



Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS Hon. JOHN PHILLIPS, LL.D. 

Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS, Jr. 



Constitution and Deeds of Trust signed 
Board of Trustees organized 
School opened for instruction 
Act of Incorporation passed 
Theological Seminary opened 
Scientific Department opened 
Archaeological Department opened 
Theological Seminary incorporated 
Theological Seminary real estate purchased 



April 21, 1778 
April 28, 1778 
April 30, 1778 
October 4, 1780 
September 28, 1808 
September 27, 1830 
May 1, 1901 
April 16, 1907 
July 1, 1908 



PRINCIPALS 



ELIPHALET PEARSON, LL.D. 1778 — 1786 

EBENEZER PEMBERTON, LL.D. 1786 — 1793 

MARK NEWMAN, A.M. 1795 — 1810 

JOHN ADAMS, LL.D. 1810 — 1833 

OSGOOD JOHNSON, A.M. 1833 — 1837 

SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, LL.D. 1838 — 1871 

FREDERIC W. TILTON. A.M. 1871 — 1873 

CECIL F. P. BANCROFT, Ph.D., LL.D. 1873 — 1901 

ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 1903 — 



TRUSTEES 



PRESIDENT 

ALFRED LAWRENCE RIPLEY, A.M. 
Elected 1902 

CLERK 

ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, Litt. D., L.H.D. 
Elected 1903 

TREASURER 

JAMES COWAN SAWYER, A.B. 
Elected 1900 



Andover 



Andover 



Andover 



JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D. 
Elected 1899 

CLARENCE MORGAN, A.B. 
Elected 1900 

CLIFFORD HERSCHELL MOORE, Litt.D. 
Elected 1902 

HENRY LEWIS STIMSON, A.M. 
Elected 1905 

ELIAS BLLLARD BISHOP, A.B. 
Elected 1907 

JOHN ADAMS AIKEN, LL.D. 
Elected 1908 

FRED TOWSLEY MURPHY, M.D. 
Elected 1908 

♦FREDERICK GOODRICH CRANE 
Elected 1912 

GEORGE BOWEN CASE, A.B. 
Elected 1920 

THOMAS COCHRANE 
Elected 1923 

JAMES BROWN NEALE 
Elected 1923 



Cambridge 
Shelbitrne, Vt. 
Cambridge 
New York City 
Newton Centre 
Greenfield 
Detroit, Mich. 

D ALTON 

Englewood, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Miners ville, Pa. 



* Deceased March 15, 1923 



FACULTY 



ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, A.M., Litt.D.. L.H.D., Principal 

On the Peter Smith Byers Memorial Foundation 6 Chapel Avenue 

Instructor 1897-1903. Elected Principal 1903 
GEORGE THOMAS EATON, A.M. 73 Bartlet Street 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1880 

CHARLES EMERSON STONE, Ph.B. 158 Main Street 

Instructor in French Appointed 1890 

CHARLES HENRY FORBES, A.M. In Europe 1922-1923 

Professor of Latin on John C. Phillips Foundation Elected 1891 

ARCHIBALD FREEMAN, A.M. Phillips 16 



Instructor in History 
ALLEN ROGERS BENNER, A.B. 

Professor of Greek 
JAMES CHANDLER GRAHAM, S.B. 

Peabody Instructor in Natural Sciences 
JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin 
FREDERICK EDWIN NEWTON, Ph.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
CHARLES PEABODY, Ph.D. 



Appointed 1892 
Andover 7 
Elected 1892 
Phillips 5 
Appointed 1892 
Williams Hall 
Appointed 1894 
9 Salem Street 
Appointed 1895 
197 Brattle Street, Cambridge 



Director of the Department of American Archaeology Elected 1901 

WARREN KING MOOREHEAD, A.M. Hidden Field 

Field Director of Archaeological Exploration in New England Elected 1901 

and Curator of the Museum 

LESTER EDWARD LYNDE, A.B. 195 Main Street 

Instructor in Mathematics and Principal s Assistant Appointed 1901 

HORACE MARTIN POYNTER, A.B. 21 Phillips Street 

Instructor in Latin Appointed 1902 

PEIRSON STERLING PAGE, M.D. 193 Main Street 

Physical Director and Medical Adviser Appointed 1902 

GEORGE WALKER HINMAN, A.M. 169 Main Street 

Instructor in Latin Appointed 1906 

CECIL KITTREDGE BANCROFT, A.B. Bartlet 5 

Instructor in Latin, Principal's Assistant, and Registrar Appointed 1906 

CHARLES ARTHUR PARMELEE, A.M. Bartlet 22 

Instructor in French Appointed 1906 



6 



ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, A.B. 


79 Bartlet Street 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1907 


GEORGE FRANKLIN FRENCH, A.M. 


12 School Street 


Instructor in French 


Appointed 1907 


CLAUDE MOORE FUESS, Ph.D. 


183 Main Street 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1908 


FREDERICK MAY BOYCE, A.M. 


Taylor Hall 


Instructor in Physics 


Appointed 1909 


GUY HEBARD EATON, A.B. 


Johnson Hall 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1909 


OSWALD TOWER, A.B. 


32 Phillips Street 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1910 


FRANK O'BRIEN, A.B. 


Adams Hall 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1910 


CARL FRIEDRICH PFATTEICHER, Th.D. 


Eaton 7 


Instructor in Music and Philosophy 


Appointed 1912 


FREDERIC WILLIAM HEATON STOTT, A.B. 


77 Bartlet Street 


Instructor in English and Public Speaking 


Appointed 1912 


EDWIN TENNEY BREWSTER, A.M. 


8 Judson Road 


Instructor in Geography 


Appointed 1916 


HOWARD WADSWORTH CHURCH, Ph.D. 


Bishop 10 


Instructor in German 


Appointed 1917 


ROY EVERETT SPENCER, A.B. 


Pemberton 4 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1917 


LESTER CHARLES NEWTON, A.M. 


34 Salem Street 


Instructor in French and German 


Appointed 1918 


LAWRENCE V ROTH, A.M. 


Taylor Hall 


Instructor in History 


Appointed 1918 


FRANK MAY BENTON, A.B. 


Johnson Hall 


Instructor in Latin 


Appointed 1918 


HAROLD CRAWFORD STEARNS, A.B. 


Bishop 29 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1918 


HENRY PRESTON KELLEY, A.B. 


Day 30 


Instructor in Spanish and French 


Appointed 1918 


WINFIELD MICHAEL SIDES, S.B. 


Day 7 


Instructor in Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing 


Appointed 1919 


HERBERT FREEMAN FRASER, A.M. 


18 Salem Street 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1919 


GEORGE EDWARD DIMOCK, Jr., Ph.D. 


173 Main Street 


Instructor in Latin 


Appointed 1921 



7 



ROSCOE EDWIN DAKE, S.B. Williams Hall 

Instructor in Mathematics and Assistant in Chemistry Appointed 1921 

THEODORE FERRY PLIMPTON, A.B. Williams Hall 

Assistant in Physics Appointed 1921 

JAMES WILLARD WILLIAMS, A.M. Bancroft 8 

Instructor in English and Bible Appointed 1922 

JAMES HAROLD SAMPLE, A.M. 54 Salem Street 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1922 



SARAH LOW FROST 
Librarian 

ALFRED VINCENT KIDDER, Ph.D. 

Director of the Southwestern Expedition of the 

Archaeological Department 
FREDERICK JOSEPH DALY, A.B. 

Private Secretary to the Principal 
RAY ARTHUR SHEPARD, S.B. 

Assistant to the Physical Director 



210 Main Street 
Appointed 1912 
215 Main Street 

Appointed 1915 
Bancroft 1 
Appointed 1916 
Draper 4 
Appointed 1919 



OTHER OFFICERS 




VIRGIL D. HARRINGTON, A.B. 


18 Chapel Avenue 


Purchasing Agent and Manager of the Service Department 


HENRY S. HOPPER 


25 Phillips Street 


Bursar 




JOHN H. BUTTIMER, S.B. 


Bishop 7 


Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 




MABEL L. JONES 


36 Salem Street 


Secretary to the Principal 




ALICE T. WHITNEY 


61 Bartlet Street 


Recorder 




MONTVILLE E. PECK 


Adams Hall 


Assistant to the Physical Director 




ETHEL A. HITCHCOCK 


High Street 


Assistant in the Purchasing Agent's Office 




MRS. G. R. CANNON 


54 Salem Street 


Assistant to the Alumni Secretary 




ANN S. LESLIE 


24 Brechin Terrace 


Assistant in the Treasurer's Office 




MELVINA M. McKEEVER 


Isham Infirmary 


Matron at Isham Infirmary 





s 



MRS. C. M. BAILEY 

Matron at Williams Hall 
EUNICE C. LOVEJOY 

Assistant in the Treasurer's Office 
E. ROSAMOND GREENWOOD, A.B 

Assistant Secretary to the Principal 
EVELYN JENKINS, A. B. 

Assistant in the Library 



Williams Hall 
21 Lovejoy Road 
Lawrence 
Ballardvale Road 



9 



ACADEMY PREACHERS, 1922-1923 



Rev. DAVID E. ADAMS 


Farmington, Me. 


President CLARENCE A. BARBOUR, D.D. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Dean JAMES A. BEEBE, D.D. 


Boston 


President BERNARD I. BELL, D.D. Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y. 


Rev. NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, D.D. 


New York City 


Dean CHARLES R. BROWN, D.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Rev. HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, D.D. 


New York City 


Rev. VAUGHAN DABNEY 


Dorchester 


Rev. D. BREWER EDDY, D.D. 


Boston 


Rev. CHARLES W. GILKEY 


Chicago, 111. 


Rev. JAMES G. GILKEY 


Springfield 


Rev. THEODORE A. GREENE 


New York City 


Rev. ARTHUR HOWE 


Watertown, Conn. 


Rt. Rev. EDWIN H. HUGHES, D.D. 


Maiden 


Dr. EDWARD H. HUME 


Chang-sha, China 


Principal WILLIAM MANN IRVINE, Ph.D., LL.D. 


Mercersburg, Pa. 


Rev. ASHLEY D. LEAVITT, D.D. 


Brookline 


Rev. SIDNEY LOVETT 


Boston 


Professor SAMUEL McCOMB, D.D. 


Cambridge 


Rev. OSCAR E. MAURER, D.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Rev. MALCOLM E. PEABODY 


Lawrence 


Professor WILLIAM LYON PHELPS, Ph.D., Litt.D 






New Haven, Conn. 


Professor T. HAYES PROCTOR, Ph.D. 


Williamstown 


Rev. HAROLD E. B. SPEIGHT 


Boston 


Principal ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D 


Andover 


Rev. PERCY E. THOMAS 


Lowell 


Rev. JOSEPH H. TWICHELL 


North Adams 


Professor HENRY HALLAM TWEEDY, D.D. 


New Haven, Conn. 



10 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is not a private school, but an endowed 
academy, controlled by a Board of Trustees and administered 
under the written constitution of its founders. By the terms 
of this Constitution, or Deed of Gift, signed April 21, 1778, 
Esquire Samuel Phillips (1715-1790) of North Andover and his 
brother, John Phillips (1719-1795) of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
set aside tracts of about 141 acres on Andover Hill and 200 acres 
in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, together with the sum of 1614 
pounds, as a foundation for a school. This document, outlining 
the broad principles upon which the proposed institution was to 
be conducted, was composed by Esquire Phillips's son, Samuel 
Phillips, Jr. (1752-1802), with the advice and aid of his friend, 
Eli phalet Pearson (1752-1826). Samuel Phillips, Jr. was after- 
wards Judge of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, 
President of the Senate, and Lieutenant-Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Although Judge Phillips derived many of his educational 
theories from the writings of John Locke and from the English 
nonconformist schools with the scheme of which he was familiar, 
his plan was nevertheless highly original. The purpose of the 
academy was specifically stated in the following words : — 

" And, in order to prevent the smallest subversion of the true intent of this 
Foundation, it is again declared, that the first and principal object of this 
Institution is the promotion of true Piety and Virtue; the second, instruction 
in English, Latin, and Greek languages, together with Writing, Arithmetic, 
Music, and the Art of Speaking; the third practical Geometry, Logic, and 
Geography; and the fourth, such other of the liberal Arts and Sciences, or 
Languages, as opportunity and ability may hereafter admit, and as the Trustees 
shall direct. 

11 



The chief emphasis was laid on the development of character, 
and the Master was to take pains "to regulate the tempers, to 
enlarge the minds, and form the Morals of the Youth com- 
mitted to his care". It was stipulated, also, that the school 
"shall be ever equally open to youth, of requisite qualifications, 
from every quarter*'. The government was placed in the hands 
of a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. In order to prevent 
sectarianism and provincialism, it was specified that a majority 
of the members should be laymen, and that more than half 
must not be residents of the town in which the academy is 
located. The Trustees were hampered by no vexatious or 
trivial restrictions, but were given sole authority over the institu- 
tion. By the provisions of the Act of Incorporation, passed by 
the General Court, October 4, 1780, their number was fixed at 
never more than thirteen or less than seven, and they were 
permitted to possess real estate with an income not exceeding 
five hundred pounds and personal property with an income not 
greater than two thousand pounds. These holding powers have 
since been considerably enlarged by legislative enactments, as 
the school has grown. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Tuesday, April 28, 1778. Of the twelve original members, four 
were members of the Phillips family : Esquire Samuel Phillips, 
John Phillips, William Phillips of Boston, and Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. These men became in turn the first four presidents of the 
Board. The other members, all relatives or close friends of the 
Phillips family, were John Lowell and Oliver Wendell of Boston 
Rev. Josiah Stearns of Epping, Rev. Elias Smith of Middleton, 
Rev. William Symmes of North Andover, and Rev. Jonathan 
French, Nehemiah Abbot, Esq., and Eliphalet Pearson of 
Andover. 

Phillips School, as it was called until its incorporation, was 
opened for instruction April 30, 1778, in a remodeled carpenter's 
shop on Andover Hill, thirteen pupils being present; before the 
year was over, fifty-two had registered. The first principal was 



12 



Eliphalet Pearson, a stimulating teacher and stern discipli- 
narian, who established high standards of instruction and 
supervision. Shortly before he resigned in 1786 to become a 
professor at Harvard, a new wooden building was erected to 
meet the demands of the rapidly expanding school. Pearson 
was succeeded by Ebenezer Pemberton, a polite and scholarly 
master, who devoted much attention to the manners of his 
pupils. When he left in 1793, he was followed in office by Mark 
Newman, in whose administration the Andover Theological 
Seminary was founded, largely through the efforts of Dr. 
Pearson. This seminary, which was opened September 28, 
1808, was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees 
of Phillips Academy, and remained in Andover almost exactly 
a century. 

The fourth principal, John Adams, who replaced Newman in 
1810, raised the prestige of the school, increased the attendance, 
and enlarged the faculty. He published the first catalogue and 
made the first revision of the curriculum; but his primary interest 
was in the moral welfare of the boys. The second Academy 
building was burned on January 28, 1818, and a new brick, 
colonial edifice, designed by the famous architect Bulfinch, was 
erected within a year; this "classic halT\ described in Oliver 
Wendell Holmes's poem, The School Boy, is now in use as the 
Dining Hall. In 1830 the Teachers' Seminary, a new institu- 
tion made possible by a bequest of His Honor, William Phillips 
(1750-1827) of Boston, was opened in a massive square structure, 
commonly known as the Stone Academy, built for that purpose. 
This Teachers' Seminary, combining the aims of a normal 
school and a scientific school, was the second of its kind in the 
United States. After twelve years of existence with only 
moderate success it was finally, in 1842, merged with Phillips 
Academy as the "English Department", a name which was 
changed in 1892 to a more nearly accurate title, "Scientific 
Department ", 



13 



In 1832 John Adams resigned at the age of sixty, and Osgood 
Johnson was elected principal. Unfortunately he died in 1837, 
of consumption, in his thirty-fifth year. During his adminis- 
tration the "Commons", dormitories known to so many gene- 
rations of Phillips boys, were built under the direction of 
Samuel Farrar, Esq., Treasurer of the Trustees. 

Samuel H. Taylor, whose reign of thirty-four years was the 
longest in the school history, became principal in 1837. The 
word "reign" is used advisedly, for he was an autocrat, severe 
in his methods of government and prompt to punish offenders. 
"Uncle Sam", as he was familiarly called, was a relentless 
drill-master in the classics and gained a well-deserved repu- 
tation for thoroughness and accuracy. He was a strong and 
vigorous personality, who made an enduring impression on all 
who came under his influence. In 1864 the Stone Academy 
was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by the present Main 
Building, which has since been twice reconstructed. In 1865 
Mr. George Peabody gave $25,000 to found the Peabody 
Instructorship in Natural Sciences, first filled by the late 
William B. Graves. Dr. Taylor, on January 29, 1871, dropped 
dead in the vestibule of the Main Building. For the next 
two years the office of principal was held by Frederic W. Tilton, 
who, however, could do little in that short period. 

The modern era of development began in 1873 with the 
arrival of Cecil F. P. Bancroft, who was principal until his 
death in 1901. Dr. Bancroft, working in a quiet, tactful, but 
persistent way, brought about many needed reforms. He 
first made a complete revision of the curriculum, thus enabling 
the school to meet the entrance requirements of any college, 
classical or scientific, and greatly broadening the range of 
studies. In his effort to gather about himself a larger and 
more efficient body of teachers he was entirely successful. The 
attendance also increased: in 1873 there were 252 pupils; in 
1895 this had grown to 524, and after 1892 it never again 
dropped below 400. Dr. Bancroft also strove to secure additions 



to the plant, especially by providing dormitories in which boys 
could live under the direct supervision of instructors. He was 
aided in this aim by Melville C. Day of the class of 1858, who, 
in 1892, gave $8000 for a new dormitory, Taylor Cottage (now 
Pemberton Cottage), which was the beginning of the present 
extensive system of houses for students. Mr. Day continued 
his gifts, providing in all six dormitories which to-day furnish 
rooms for 168 boys, besides the teachers in charge. At his 
death in 1913 Mr. Day made Phillips Academy his residuary 
legatee. His gifts to the school amount in all to over $800,000. 

On June 5 and 6, 1878, Phillips Academy celebrated its 
centennial anniversary with elaborate exercises, including an 
historical paper by Rev. William E. Park, an oration by Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and 
speeches by Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Gustavus V. Fox, 
and other distinguished men associated with the school. At 
this time a fund of $100,000 was raised, partly for the en- 
dowment of a principalship and a professorship in Latin. 

Dr. Bancroft's period was marked by both progress and 
expansion. He was a man of clear vision and foresight, firm 
will, and shrewd discrimination, who had the good sense to be 
patient until circumstances were favorable for pressing his 
projects. His policy has been maintained by his successor, 
Alfred E. Stearns, during whose administration Phillips 
Academy has grown in material equipment, in numbers, and in 
efficiency. In 1908, when Andover Theological Seminary was 
moved to Cambridge, the Trustees acquired the entire Seminary 
plant on Andover Hill at a cost of $200,000, thus more than 
doubling its property in land and buildings. In 1901 two 
generous benefactors of the school, Mr. R. Singleton Peabody 
of the class of 1857, and his wife, Margaret Peabody, estab- 
lished the Archaeological Department and provided for it a large 
endowment for instruction, publication, and research, and for 
the care and housing of collections in American Archaeology. 

16 



The official installation of Principal Stearns into office happily 
coincided with the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the 
founding of the school, held on June 16, 1903. The guest of 
honor was His Excellency, Sir Chentung Liang Cheng, Minister 
Plenipotentiary from the Chinese Empire to the United States, 
who was a student at Phillips Academy in 1880 and 1881. At 
the exercises in the new Borden Gymnasium the speakers were 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie, Hon. Robert R. Bishop, Sir Chentung 
Liang Cheng, and Mr. Stearns. On the same day Brothers' 
Field was dedicated with an address from the principal donor, 
Mr. George B. Knapp. 

Concerning the significant developments of recent years, im- 
portant though they are, little need be said here. At his death 
in 1917 Colonel Oliver Hazard Payne, of the class of 1859, be- 
queathed to the academy the sum of $500,000, this being the 
largest single gift yet made to the Trustees. In 1919, at the 
instigation of an alumni committee, a nation-wide campaign for 
a Building and Endowment Fund of $1,500,000 was opened, and 
has resulted in the securing of about $1,600,000. The income of 
two-thirds of this amount will be devoted to the salaries of 
teachers and officers. 

In the World War, Phillips Academy played a distinguished 
part. Its Ambulance Unit, which sailed overseas in April 1917, 
was the first to be sent from any American school, and its bat- 
talion, formed in February, 1917, prepared many young men for 
the army. At least 2400 of its alumni were enrolled in the mili- 
tary or naval service of the United States or its Allies; and 
eighty-seven gave their lives in the cause of their country. A 
Memorial Bell Tower, erected on Andover Hill, commemorates 
their loyalty and sacrifice. 

LOCATION 

Andover is a town of nine thousand inhabitants, situated 
on the Portland Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
twenty -three miles north of Boston. 



16 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY is national in its representation and 
democratic in its life and spirit, and is "equally open to youth 
of requisite qualifications from every quarter". It aims to at- 
tract students of serious educational purposes and high moral 
standards. 

The Academy is not a suitable school for boys who are idle, 
insubordinate, or lacking in self-control; nor is it adapted for 
those who require the constant supervision of teachers in the 
preparation of school work. Students who are found to be un- 
able or unwilling to meet the requirements, and those whose 
influence is injurious, must be withdrawn from the school. As 
maturity is not always to be measured by years, the school has 
no specific regula tion as to the age of the candidate. In general, 
however, it has been found that boys of fourteen are able to meet 
the responsibilities of life in the Academy. 

The school provides accommodations and surroundings for its 
students which enable them to pass by gradual and natural 
stages from the paternalism of home life to the freedom that 
awaits them in college. Williams Hall, with its close supervision, 
special hours, and home life, offers attractive and helpful 
surroundings to the young boy just leaving home for his school 
career. A natural and progressive development is provided for 
subsequent years in the houses and halls which are in charge ol 
married instructors. The regulations which obtain in all 
dormitories are here in force, but there is in them the atmos- 
phere of home. The later life of the dormitories is designed to 
develop a larger sense of responsibility and to prepare for the 
community life of college. Boys in the dormitories are under 
the supervision of instructors and are required to observe fully 
the regulations of the school. In the judgment of the school 
authorities the average boy will secure the best results intel- 
lectually and morally by following out this gradual change in 
residence. 



17 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



The requirements for admission to Phillips Academy consist in 
evidence of good character and of a satisfactory school record. 
The Academy being unable to receive all who apply for admis- 
sion, even when they can meet its minimum requirements, is 
obliged to discriminate among the applicants on the basis of 
their school records. It asks each candidate for admission to 
take certain specified examinations, in part to enable it to dis- 
criminate fairly among the applicants, but chiefly to enable it to 
properly classify those who are admitted. The school record 
already made by an applicant — interpreted to some extent 
by these examinations — determines largely the Academy's 
decision on each applicant. 

Students in the Academy arrange their work in accordance 
with the Course of Study as outlined on pages 48-50. This 
outline exhibits the work which is done each year by a 
student who is neither behind nor ahead of his class in any 
subject. It is not required that all the studies of a student shall 
be in the class in which he is rated; he is permitted to take in- 
dividual subjects below or above that class, if his preparation 
in the prerequisites of those subjects justifies such action. But a 
student ordinarily is not permitted to take courses in one class 
to the exclusion of uncompleted courses in a lower class except in 
subjects continuing through successive years. 

Applicants for admission to any of the three lower classes are 
asked to take entrance examinations set by the Academy on the 
work of such courses in its curriculum as they have completed. 
(In some subjects the examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board should be taken.) Each candidate should 
take the examinations for which his previous work fits him, 
irrespective of the class groups in which the subjects are listed 
below. 



18 



_ . To enter as a normal Junior (first-year class) a 

Q^ as9 candidate must have completed an approved 

grammar school course. He must pass satis- 
factorily examinations (1) in the following topics of Arithmetic: 
common and decimal fractions, denominate numbers, per- 
centage, interest, and square root, and (2) in such essentials of 
formal English grammar as are treated in Kittredge and 
Farley's Concise English Grammar (Ginn & Co.). The examina- 
tion in English grammar will be combined with a test in spelling 
and composition. It is strongly recommended that candidates 
for the Junior Class become familiar with the declensions and 
conjugations of either Latin or French before entrance to the 
Academy. 

j^ ower For those who wish to enter as normal Lower 

Middle Middlers the Academy sets papers on the work 

Q^ ass done in its Junior year as outlined on pages 

48-49. These examinations cover: 
one year's work in Algebra, as described on page 57. 
one year's work in English, as described on page 55. 
one year's work in Latin, as described on page 51. 
one year's work in French (or German), as described on 
pages 52-53. 

,j Those who wish to enter as normal Upper 

\Iiddle Middlers should take examinations on the work 

gl ass of the Academy's first two years, as outlined 

on pages 48-49. These examinations cover: 
*At least one year's work in Algebra (see note below) 

♦Candidates for the Upper Middle Scientific Class should have completed Elementary 
Algebra (Mathematics A, as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board) and 
should secure credit for this subject at the college for which they are preparing. Those who 
cannot secure this credit should take the Academy's examination covering its first year' 
work in Algebra, described on page 57. Candidates who pass that examination study 
Algebra 2 in the Academy. 

Normal candidates for the Upper Middle Classical Class are required to take the Acad- 
emy's examination on its first year's work in Algebra, described on page 57. If the 
candidate can secure credit at college for Elementary Algebra Complete (Mathematics A, 
as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board), he should Jo so, and the Acad- 
emy's examination in Algebra is waived. 



19 



two years' work in English, as described on page 55. 
two years' work in Latin, as described on pages 51-52. 
two years' work in French (or German) as described on 
pages 52-54. 

one year's work in German (or French) or Greek, as des- 
cribed on pages 53-52-51. 
As a substitute for any of its examinations the Academy will 
accept grades of 60% or higher obtained on a corresponding 
examination of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
It will also accept credits already established (by examination 
or certificate) at the college for which the candidate is preparing. 
Candidates who have completed a subject which they do not wish to 
continue should obtain credit at college for that subject instead 
of taking the Academy's examination. The Academy's examina- 
tions are designed to determine a candidate's ability to do 
further work in a subject and ordinarily do not give credit for 
a subject that is not to be continued. 

Senior Each Upper Middler in the Academy at the 

Classes en( * °^ ^ S ^PP er Middle year takes preliminary 

college examinations. Candidates for admission 
to the Senior Classes, therefore, should secure credit, at the col- 
lege for which they are preparing, for the work of the Acad- 
emy's three lower years or its equivalent. These credits are ob- 
tained by passing college entrance examinations, or, in the case 
of those colleges which admit on the certificate plan, by pres- 
enting to the college such certificates as it requires. 

The Academy occasionally admits to its Senior Class candi- 
dates for admission to college by the so-called "new plan". No 
candidate will be accepted on this basis unless he has completed 
an approved equivalent of the three lower years in the Academy, 
and has made an especially good record in scholarship. He must 
pass entrance examinations set by the Academy in those sub- 
jects already studied which he will continue. 

Students are not admitted to the Senior Class later than thr 
beginning of the winter term. 

SO 



~. .v Candidates who are admitted to the Academy 

Classification , . . ,, ' . ,'. ., 

and secure credits in the ways indicated in the 

preceding paragraphs are rated as 

Juniors, if credited with fewer than 10 hours of the Acad- 
emy's courses; 
Lower Middlers, if credited with 10 to 27 hours; 
Upper Middlers, if credited with 28 to 44 hours; 
Seniors, if credited with 45 hours. 

Procedure * n ma ^ m ^ application for admission to the 

. . Academy the form in the back of this catalogue 

in app y ng should be used. It should be filled out care- 
fully and completely and forwarded to the Principal of the 
Academy. Testimonial letters may either accompany it or be 
sent later. 

Certificates of standing in schools formerly attended are 
required. At the close of the school year, in June, the Academy 
sends to these institutions for complete official records of the 
candidates' work. 

Each candidate should take in June such examinations as the 
requirements outlined on pages 19-20 demand. Candidates 
should not count on qualifying by means of September exam- 
inations without definite assurance from the school authorities 
of the possibility of their admission in this way. The pressure 
for admission in recent years makes such procedure difficult. 
Those who take college examinations or secure certificate credits 
at college should forward official returns to the Academy as 
soon as they are received. 

Present members of the school are allowed first choice in room 
reservations for the following year. Rooms are regularly as- 
signed to incoming students about August 1, and in the order in 
which their admission applications are filed. Space for indicat- 
ing room preference is provided on the admission application 
form. 



21 



Fntrance Phillips Academy entrance examinations for 

^ . candidates for the Junior, Lower Middle, and 

Examinations TT „ . , 4< , „ ,. 

U fl | M an( i Upper Middle classes, and new plan candi- 

Places dates for the Senior class will be held on Tuesday 

and Wednesday, June 19 and 20, 1923. The 
schedule of hours is announced in May. The examinations will 
be given in 

Andover: Phillips Academy, Graves Hall. 

Chicago: Northwestern University Building, corner Lake 

and Dearborn Streets. 
New York: Room 306, School of Mines, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Examinations will be held in other large cities, in June only, 
if the number of candidates in any locality is sufficient. 

The examinations of the College Entrance Examination 
Board are held in a large number of cities in the United States, 
and abroad, during the week of June 18-23, 1923. Application 
to take these examinations should be made to the Secretary of 
the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th 
Street, New York City, in general before the middle of May. 

On Tuesday, September 11, 1923, examinations will be held at 
9.30 A.M., in Andover only, according to a schedule of rooms 
and hours announced at that time. 

For examinations held in Andover on these regular dates no 
fees are charged. For examinations held outside of Andover a 
fee of $5.00 is required. 

Specimen examination papers will be supplied upon request. 

. . No special students, except foreigners, are re- 

„ j ceived in the Junior or Lower Middle year, and 

students A , . . . - . , 

the Academy makes no provision for special 

students who are not candidates for graduation, or for entrance 

to college, scientific school, or professional school. 

Special courses may be arranged in the Upper Middle and 



Senior years, only at the written request of parents and by 
special Faculty vote. 

Diploma The diploma of the Academy is granted to 

Requirements students who have secured passing grades, 
(a) in all required subjects in the course selected, 
(6) in subjects which amount to at least 68 hours of the 
curriculum, 

(c) in a sufficient number of the subjects recognized by the 
College Entrance Examination Board to complete 15 units, 

(d) in all subjects pursued in the Senior year. 

r, . Written examinations are held in each study at 

Examinations . . . . .. . . . 

least once a term, but the term grading is based 

Promotions ° D ^ e resu ^ °^ D °^ n wr itten examinations and 
daily work. A student who is guilty of dis- 
honesty in an examination may be suspended or dismissed. At 
the close of each term, a report of the student's scholarship 
and attitude towards his work is sent to his parents or guardian. 
Mid-term reports are also sent for all students whose work is 
below the passing grade, 60%, and for those who obtain grades 
of 80% and above. 

Q^ ass Each student is assigned to the special care of 

n - a member of the Faculty who is known as his 

Class Officer. This officer arranges the sched- 
ule of studies for each member of the class under his charge, 
and recommends such subsequent changes as seem desirable. 

~. . . The entire school is divided into groups of 

LJlWLS'lOtl 

„ approximately twenty students each. Each 

group is assigned to the special charge of an 
instructor whose duty it is to familiarize himself with the 
previous history and present standing of the several members 
and to serve as their counselor. 



23 



APPOINTMENTS 



7.45 a.m. Morning chapel. 

8.07 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. jRecitation 
Daily 4.07 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. [and study hours. 

Appointments 8.00 p.m. Evening study hours begin. 

10.30 a.m. and 5.15 p.m. Sunday chapel services. 

Wednesday and Saturday afternoons are half-holidays. 

Stud Hours Students are expected to occupy themselves 
y with their studies or other school work during 

ail study hours. 

. . Every absence of the student from recitation, 

A. osen ces . 

morning chapel, Sunday service, or from his 

room during study hours, must be accounted for. The accumu- 
lation of eight unexcused absences involves suspension from 
school. In all cases of illness, notice must be sent at once to the 
Medical Adviser, who investigates daily all cases reported. 

Special importance is attached to meeting all appointments 
immediately preceding and following vacation and recess periods. 
A failure to meet such appointments must be regarded as a very 
serious offence and may necessitate withdrawal from school. 

t town ^ out-of-town excuses must be obtained from 
E cuse ^ C ^ rmc *P a ^ ^ n na lf-h°tidays and on spe- 

cial holidays such excuses are granted occa- 
sionally to those whose school standing is good. The student 
who goes out of town without permission forfeits his connection 
with the school. 

Students are required to be present at 
Exercises morning chapel. The Sunday services in 

the Chapel and the religious work of the 
school is conducted in connection with the Academy Church, 
an undenominational organization. Distinguished clergymen 
are frequently invited to preach to the school. 
Voluntary communion services are held in the Chapel 

24 



during the year. The Society of Inquiry (the Christian Associa- 
tion of the school) holds a voluntary meeting on Sunday 
evening, which is often addressed by an invited speaker. Dur- 
ing the winter term this society maintains a number of volun- 
tary Bible and Discussion Groups led by members of the faculty. 

Upon written request from their parents, students may be 
excused to attend the morning services of the Protestant Epis- 
copal, Baptist or Roman Catholic churches. 

EXPENSES 

Parents can estimate approximately the expenses of their sons 
at the Academy, and they are particularly requested not to 
furnish money beyond what is necessary for modest expendi- 
tures. Pupils who are supplied with much spending money, 
or who are allowed to incur debts, often accomplish little in 
their studies, and are liable to form habits which require their 
withdrawal from the school. Parents are earnestly requested 
to refuse permission to their sons to contract debts. 

The schedules of the items named below indicate the range of 
school charges. 

Table 1 indicates the range of the Academy's regular charges. 
Table 2 shows an average charge. Table 3 indicates the charges 
to scholarship students. 

Table 1 Table 2 *Table 3 

Tuition $200 . 00 $200 . 00 $0 to 200 . 00 

Room, light, and heat 100 . 00 to 350 . 00 225 .00 to 50 . 00 

Board 230 . 00 to 420 . 00 280.00 to 280.00 

Athletic fee 20.00 20.00 to 12.00 



$550 . 00 to 990 . 00 $725 . 00 $0 to 542 . 00 

T V 7? 77 ^ e tmt * ori f° r tne y ear * s $-00.00 divided as 
luitionmus follows . three-fifths, or $120.00, payable Octo- 
ber 1; two-fifths, or $80.00, payable on March 1. Each student 
is required to deposit with the Treasurer on entering the school 
the sum of $20.00 to cover breakage and other obligations w r hich 
may be incurred during the school year. The balance remaining 
after such charges have been deducted will be returned. 
*For explanation of the items in Table 3 see pages 36 and 26. 

25 



All additional charge of $10.00 is made to members of the 
Senior class to cover the expenses of Commencement. A 
rebate of $1.50 from this charge is made if the student fails 
to secure his diploma. Students in Chemistry and Physics 
are charged for the supplies which they use. All bills are mailed 
to parents or guardians, but may be paid in person by the 
students. Class-room privileges will be denied to students 
whose bills are not settled on or before the dates mentioned 
above. As instructors must be engaged and other provisions 
for education must be made by the school authorities for the 
entire year in advance, tuition charges will not be refunded when 
students are suspended, dismissed, or withdrawn during the school 
year. Checks should be drawn in favor of the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy. 

A charge of four dollars a day to each student 
Infirmary is made for infirmary service which includes 

Service room and board. Extra charges are made for 

nurses employed in addition to the regular 
nursing staff. Local physicians render their bills for services 
directly to parents or guardians. 

Athletic Fee ^ charge of $20.00 is made for the main- 
tenance of athletics, but for scholarship boys 
this charge is $12.00 a year which may be paid wholly or 
in part by the performance of special work assigned by the 
Treasurer. Three-fifths of the total amount of this charge 
is payable October 1st, and two-fifths on March 1st. Students 
are not asked to contribute further to the financial support 
of the various school teams. 

Room Rents Payments for student rooms in the school 
buildings are required as follows: three-fifths 
of the entire yearly rental on or before October 1 ; the remaining 
two-fifths on March 1. A deposit of $25.00, which will be 
credited to the first regular payment of room rent, is required 

«6 



when the contract for the room is filed and the assignment 
made. When a room is assigned to a student, his parent or 
guardian agrees by contract to pay the entire rental of the room 
up to the close of the current school year y whether the student con- 
tinues a member of the Academy or not. The right is reserved 
by the Trustees to transfer boys from room to room in the 
school buildings whenever changes seem desirable; such changes, 
however, do not relieve the original occupants from the obliga- 
tion of meeting the entire year's rent unless newcomers are 
secured to fill the vacancies. 

Each room is furnished with a rug, desk, chiffonier, chairs, 
bed, and bedding. Towels are not included. 

No refund of deposits will be made until the close of books for 
the fiscal year, June 30. 

PRICES OF ROOMS FOR 1923-1924 

SINGLE ROOMS 

$100.00 Andover, Nos. 3, 5; Clement, No. 6; Pease, No. 14; Woods, No. 8. 
$125 . 00 Churchill, No. 4 ; Hardy, Nos. 4, 5. 
$185 .00 Woods, No. 7. 

$150.00 Churchill, No. 6; Clement, Nos. 3, 5. 8; Tucker, Nos. 2, 4, 5; Tower. 
No. 8. 

$160 00 Woods, No. 5. 
$175 . 00 Tower, Nos. 4, 5. 

$200.00 Churchill, No. 3; Clement, Nos. 4, 7; Hardy, Nos. 1, 2, 3; Taylor, 
Nos. 5, 12, 19, 26. 

$225 .00 Day, Nos. 15, 34; Johnson, Nos. 6, 13, 16, 23; Taylor, Nos. 1,6, 8, 
13, 15, 20, 22, 27. 

$250.00 Abbot, Nos. 13, 14; Adams, Nos. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14. 19, 20; Bishop, 
Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 81, 32; Clement, 
No. 1; Day, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17. 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; 
Johnson, Nos. 7, 14, 15, 22; Park, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phillips, Nos. 
3, 4, 7, 14, 15, 18; Taylor, Nos. 7, 14, 21, 28. 

$275 .00 Clement, No. 2; Johnson, Nos. 2, 9, 20, 27. 

$300.00 Johnson, Nos. 1, 8, 21, 28. 

SINGLE SUITES 
$250.00 Clement, No. 13; Eaton, Nos. 3, 4. 

$300. 00 Andover, No. 4; Bartlet, Nos. 4, 10, 11, 14, 15. 16, 23, 24, 27, 28. 
$325 . 00 Adams, Nos. 1, 7, 18, 24; Bishop, Nos. 7. 13, 36; Day. Nos. 13. 86. 



27 



DOUBLE ROOMS 



The price stated is the amount paid by each student — not the price of the 
room. 

$135 . 00 Abbot, Nos. 4, 5, 7, 16; Farrar, Nos. 4, 6; Pease, Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. 
$150.00 Churchill, No. 5; Tucker, No. 3. 
$175.00 Johnson, Nos. 4, 11, 18, 25. 
$200.00 Tucker, No. 1. 

DOUBLE SUITES 
The price stated is the amount paid by each student — not the price of the 
suite. 

$160. 00 Abbot, Nos. 6, 15; Farrar, No. 5. 

$200. 00 Andover, Nos. 1, 6, 9; Bishop, No. 28; Draper, Nos. 1, 3, 5; 6; Eaton, 
Nos. 1, 5, 6; Pemberton, Nos. 1, 3, 5, 6; Woods, No. 6. 

$225.00 Bancroft, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15. 16, 18. 

$450.00 Adams, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 23; Bartlet, Nos. 1, 2, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 30; Bishop, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 33, 
35; Day, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 33, 35; Taylor, 
Nos. 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25. 

$275.00 Phillips, Nos. 2, 12 

$300.00 Johnson, Nos. 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26; Phillips, Nos 1, 8, 11, 13, 
19, 22. 

$350.00 Bartlet, Nos. 7, 20. 



jl Qom About twenty "room scholarships" amount- 

, . ing to approximately $50.00 each are available 
* for deserving boys. These scholarships will be 
credited to the regular room charges on the recipients' term 
bills and will be awarded by the Principal to boys whose cir- 
cumstances compel them to keep their expenses at a low average. 

D'nin Hall ^ e equipment of the Academy includes a 
well-appointed Dining Hall which accommo- 
dates two hundred and fifty boys. A fixed charge of $4.50 a 
week, payable one term in advance, has been made during the 
year 1922-1923 to cover light, heat, service, and food such as 
soups, vegetables, cereals, bread, butter, milk, coffee, tea, etc. 
Meats, fish, eggs, and desserts are served a la carte at cost and 
are charged against meal-tickets which are sold at $5.00 each. 
The average cost has been about $8.00 a week. 



Private About fifteen private houses in the vicinity of 

Houses ^ e ^ cao - ern y' under license from the Trustees, 

provide board and lodgings for students, 
and no student may occupy any house not thus licensed by the 
school. Some of the houses provide furnished rooms only; 
others provide rooms and board, and some furnish board for 
students rooming in neighboring houses. The price of table 
board is $10.00 and $12.00 a week. Students rooming in private 
families may, if they desire, board at the Dining Hall. The 
price of furnished rooms, including ordinary service, is from 
$5.00 to $7.50 a week. 

As engagements for rooms in private families continue to 
the end of the Academic year, care should be exercised in the 
selection of rooms. Engagements for table board may, on 
suitable notice, be terminated at the close of any term. Ar- 
rangements and payments for room and board in private houses 
must be made with those in charge of the houses. 



S U M M A R Y OF P A Y M ENTS 

Tuition: 1st payment, Oct. 1; $120.00 2nd payment, March 1; $80.00 

Athletic Fee: 1st M "1; 12.00 2nd " " 1; 8.00 

Room: 1st " " 1; three- 2nd " "1: two 

6fths of total charge. fifths of total charge. 
Deposit: Payable October 1: amount, $20.00, 
Graduation Fee: Payable March 1; amount, $10.00. 
Table Board: Payable one term in advance. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMEN T 
Williams Hall through the generosity of Prof. Edward H. 
A Dormitori for ^ ^^ ams ' '^ r " °^ * ne c ^ ass °f 1868, the school 
Yt vn Boi <? * n secured possession of a valuable piece of 
property for the housing and care of younger 
boys. The property, comprising several acres, adjoins the Old 
Campus and is within a short distance of the other school 
buildings. 

29 



Williams Hall has attractive accommodations for forty- 
two boys. The rooms are spacious, light, and airy, and are 
heated with hot water and lighted with electricity. On the 
main floor is a common reading and recreation room. Table 
board is furnished in the building to all occupants of the house. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to provide in this building sur- 
roundings as helpful as possible for the best development of 
young boys, and to this end they have placed it in charge of a 
married instructor. Boys whose work is below standard may 
be required to report at seven-thirty each evening, when they 
work under supervision and are free to consult the resident 
instructor and his assistants in regard to their studies. 

Williams Hall supplies a stepping-stone between the natural 
restrictions of the home and the somewhat freer life of a large 
school. Although the boys who live here have all the advan- 
tages that Phillips Academy offers, they are under somewhat 
closer supervision than is customary throughout the rest of the 
school. For the school year 1923-1924 the charge for room and 
board in Williams Hall, not including the regular tuition charge, 
will be $750.00. A limited number of room scholarships are 
awarded annually in this hall. A special circular explaining 
in detail the equipment and arrangements of Williams Hall, 
and containing both interior and exterior views of this building, 
will be furnished on request. 

r, T1 The school provides for dormitory purposes 

Faculty Houses , . . . . , . . j , 

eleven houses formerly occupied as private dwel- 
lings. These houses are suitable for younger boys, especially 
those who are members of the two lower classes. Each house 
is in charge of a resident instructor. The rooms are furnished, 
and the charges include heat, light, and care of the rooms. 

The Abbot House provides accommodations for eighteen boys, 
the Churchill House for six, the America House for twelve, 
the Clement House for thirteen, the Farrar House for six, 
the Hardy House for five, the Park House for four, the Pease 



30 



House for nine, the Tower House for three, the Tucker House 
for seven, and the Woods House for five. 

.. . Through the generous gifts of Mr. Melville C. 

Dormitories ~ . m -n r\ 

Day of the class of 1858, Mr. Warren F. Draper 

of the class of 1843, and a number of citizens of Andover, and by 

the purchase of the property formerly belonging to the Andover 

Theological Seminary, the Academy now possesses thoroughly 

modern dormitories providing at reasonable rates attractive 

accommodations for almost the entire student body. Below is 

given a brief description of these various buildings, and a list 

of the prices of rooms in each will be found on pages 27-28. With 

the exception of some of the Faculty Houses and Williams Hall 

these buildings are of brick. All are furnished, heated by 

steam, lighted by electricity, and equipped with shower-baths 

and the modern sanitary conveniences. Most of the study 

rooms have open fireplaces. Each building or entry is in charge 

of a resident instructor. 

Phillips Hall, erected in 1808, was entirely remodeled in 
1912. It is divided by a fire wall into two separate entries and 
provides accommodations for seventeen boys in each entry. 

Bartlet Hall was erected in 1817 and entirely rebuilt in 19 15 . 

This building also is divided by a fire wall into two separate 
entries, and contains both double and single suites, accommo- 
dating twenty-one boys in each entry. 

Pemberton Cottage, erected in 1891, contains five double 
suites. 

Andover Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double 
suites, one single suite, and two single rooms. 

Draper Cottage, erected in 1892, contains five double 
suites. 

Eaton Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double suites 
and two single suites. 



31 



Bancroft Hall, erected in 1900, contains fifteen double 
suites. The building is divided by fire walls into three separate 
entries, each entry accommodating ten boys. 



Day Hall, erected in 1911, contains twelve double suites, two 
single suites, and twenty single rooms. The building is divided 
by a fire wall into two separate entries, each entry accommo- 
dating twenty-three boys. 

Bishop Hall, erected in 1911, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Day Hall and accommodates the same 
number of boys. 

Adams Hall, erected in 1912, is divided into two separate 
entries, each of which, like the Faculty Houses, is in charge of 
a married instructor. Each entry accommodates twenty boys. 

Taylor Hall, erected in 1913, accommodates twenty boys 
in each of its two entries and is in charge of two married in- 
structors. 

Johnson Hall, erected in 1922, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Taylor Hall and accommodates the 
same number of boys. 

(For prices of rooms see pages 27-28.) 

Main This recitation building was erected in 1865 

Building and contains twelve recitation rooms. 



Graves Hall 



Graves Hall, devoted to Science, contains in 
addition to the large and well-equipped labora- 
tories for Physics and Chemistry, four recitation rooms, a 
lecture room, and a drafting room. 

Pearson Hall ^ earson Hall, erected in 1817 and remodeled in 
1878, and again in 1922, is used for recitation 
purposes. It contains four large recitation rooms and three 
conference rooms. 

3« 



. , . This building contains rooms for the collection 

_ of the Department of Archaeology and a lecture 

Buildmq 

room. 

Peabod House ^ ea ^°^ H° use bears the name of the founders 
of the Archaeological department, with the 
funds of which it was erected. The building carries out the 
expressed wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody that their bene- 
faction should promote the social interests of the student body 
as well as further the study of American Archaeology. Quar- 
ters are provided for the Phillips Union and include a well- 
appointed grill, a large and attractive reading room, and a 
memorial room used as an assembly hall for receptions, lectures, 
and meetings of the various organizations of the school. 

' ... Brechin Hall is used for administrative and 

Administration ... mi_ i n 

Offices and horary purposes, lhe lower floor contains 
JL the offices of the Principal, the Treasurer, 

and the Registrar. A large hall on the upper 
floor is devoted to the library of about fifteen thousand vol- 
umes, which is in charge of a trained librarian and is open 
daily for the use of students. 

The Cha el ^ ne ^apel, erected in 1875 and enlarged in 
1920, provides accommodations for the religious 
exercises of the school. The daily morning chapel exercises 
and the Sunday preaching and vesper services are held in this 
building. The Chapel contains the William Couch Egleston 
memorial organ. 

Borden ^ e ^ ca( * emy nas a * ar £ e gymnasium, com- 

r . pletely equipped with modern apparatus, and 

in charge of a Physical Director who is also 
the Medical Adviser. Students of all classes are required to take 
regular gymnasium work. 

Swimming Pool The s ^ mming P 00 *' fining the gymna- 
sium, is seventy-five feet long and thirty feet 
wide, and represents the most modern ideas in swimming pool 

SS 



construction. The elaborate filtration plant in the basement of 
the building assures the purity of the water used in the pool. 

The swimming pool was constructed in 1910 with funds se- 
cured entirely by the efforts of the students themselves. 

Philli s Inn ^ e scno °^ P ro P er ty includes a well-equipped 
hotel, situated near the centre of the grounds, 
under lease to a manager, and furnishing to parents and friends 
of the school quiet and comfortable accommodations. 

The I sham ^ e ^ ca< ^ em y maintains an infirmary, the gen- 
j r erous gift of Miss Flora E. Isham, whose name 

it bears. The infirmary was completed in 1912, 
is thoroughly modern in all its appointments, and was carefully 
planned under the direction of experts in hospital construction. 
In addition to the general wards, it contains single rooms for 
those requiring special treatment, an operating room, and quart- 
ers for visiting parents. The contagious wards are completely 
separated from the ordinary wards, and at each end of the build- 
ing there is a large sun parlor entirely encased in glass. Boys 
who are sufficiently indisposed to be unable to attend classes 
are sent to the infirmary for proper care. Except when special 
arrangements have been made in advance by parents or guar- 
dians, the following regulations will be observed in the conduct 
of the infirmary. Patients at the infirmary requiring medical 
attention shall call in local physicians approved by the school 
authorities. In cases requiring the attendance of special- 
ists, the best men available in Boston will be called in con- 
sultation. In special emergencies, when operations seem 
necessary and parents cannot be consulted in advance, the 
Principal of the school assumes responsibility for authorizing 
such operations. The Medical Adviser may at any time 
examine and report upon individual cases. 



34 



Athletic Brothers' Field, comprising twenty -three acres, 

Grounds 1S m °^ ose P rox i m ^y to the gymnasium and 

contains ample facilities for baseball, foot- 
ball, and track athletics. The Academy possesses other exten- 
sive grounds for various athletic sports, including baseball, 
football, soccer, and tennis. 

Bulletin bulletin, a magazine devoted to the in- 

terests and history of the school and its alum- 
ni, is published four times a year and sent to all former 
members of Phillips Academy whose addresses are known. 



35 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



, . The sums granted as scholarships vary accord- 

* ing to the excellence of the boys in their 
studies, a student of the highest rank receiving 
a sum equivalent to the full tuition fee and room rent. Every 
new applicant for a scholarship must pay on entering the Acad- 
emy the sum of $50 toward his tuition. This sum is not re- 
mitted. At the close of each term scholarships are adjusted 
in accordance with the student's record in his studies during 
that term. Boys of limited means who possess scholarly ability 
ana ambition are encouraged to apply for admission, and, if 
admitted, may be reasonably sure of financial assistance. 

Furnished rooms are set apart in various 

p • • r f dormitories for boys who are obliged to keep 

: R their expenses within the lowest possible 
Scholarship Boys A rentaJ q{ m ^ $5Q . g charged each 

occupant of these rooms. Choice of room is determined by the 
scholarship rank of the applicant. 

Ample opportunities are afforded by the Acad- 
3 P emy to scholarship boys to earn a portion of 

their school charges. Service in the Dining Hall and boarding 
houses enables them to earn their board. Several agencies are 
assigned by the Bureau of Self Help and a number of students 
may earn a portion of the school charges by work in connec- 
tion with the school offices, and in caring for recitation rooms. 
An energetic boy may find various other chances for remunera- 
tive work. 

The William Phillips Fund of $4,633.33 
Scholarship established in 1795 by a gift of Hon. 

Funds William Phillips and increased in 1827 by 

his bequest. 

36 



The Students* Educational Fund, begun with a gift of $100 
from the Senior Class of 1854, now amounts to $5,700. 

The Farrar Fund, a legacy from a former Treasurer, Samuel 
Farrar, established in 1865, amounts, with additions from 
income, to $22,000. 

The Clarke Scholarship Fund of $1,200 was established in 1870 
in memory of Mrs. John Aiken Clarke. 

The Samuel H. Taylor Memorial Fund of $3,700 was estab- 
lished in 1871. 

The Peter Smith Byers Scholarship of $500 was established in 
1878 by the late John Byers. 

The Class of 1878 Scholarship Fund, established by the Classi- 
cal Class of 1878, amounts to $943.21. 

The Jonathan Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1878 by the late Edward Taylor in memory of his father. 

The French Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 1879 by 
the bequest of Hiram W. French. 

The Caroline Parker Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1880 by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy. 

The Alden Memorial Fund of $5,000, a legacy from Dr. 
Ebenezer Alden, was established in 1881. 

The Gerard Sumner Wiggin Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1881 by the bequest of Lady Elizabeth Sumner 
Buckley-Mathew Fleming. 

The Stone Educational Fund of $25,000 was established in 
1882 by Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Valeria G. Stone Guarantee Fund of $1,400 was established 
in 1882 from premium received on stocks sold from the gift 
of Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Warren F. Draper Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Warren F. Draper. 



37 



The Richards Scholarship of $1,450 was established in 1889 
by the late Mrs. Mary A. Richards in memory of her sons. 

The Charles L. Flint Sclwlarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the bequest of Hon. Charles L. Flint. 

The Henry P. Haven Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1890 by the estate of Henry P. Haven. 

The Emma Lane Smyth Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1890 by the late Ex-Governor Frederick Smyth of New 
Hampshire. 

The James and Per sis Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Mrs. Mary E. Fairbanks. 

The Doive Scholarship Fund, established in 1892 by the be- 
quest of Joseph Dowe, amounts to $3,097.98. 

The John Cornell Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was established 
in 1894 by the bequest of John Cornell for pupils from the town 
of Andover. 

The James Calvin Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was founded 
in 1895 by his sister, the late Mrs. Mary W. Fairbanks. 

The Mary W. Holbrook Fund of $500 was founded in 1900 
by legacy of Mary W. Holbrook. 

The Edward Taylor Fund y a legacy from Edward Taylor, 
established in 1900, amounts to $1,000. 

The Ruby A. Carter Scholarship of $1,500 was founded in 1905 
by the late Mrs. Ruby A. Carter, in memory of her husband 
and daughter. 

The Herman Verhwff Hartwell Scholarship of $2,000 was 
founded in 1907 by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Hartwell in memory 
of their son. 

The Timothy A. Holt Scholarship Fund of $26,000 was estab- 
lished in 1908 by the bequest of Timothy A. Holt for the benefit 
of pupils from the town of Andover. 



38 



The George Ripley Fund of $2,500 was established in 1908 
by a bequest of George Ripley of Andover. 

The James Huntington Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1910 by the widow and daughter of James Huntington, 
P. A. 1848. 

The Charles C. Clough Memorial Fund of $1473 was estab- 
lished in 1923 by the Princeton classmates and friends of the 
late Charles C. Clough, P.S., 1906. 

The Allan Morse Penfield Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1913 by the legacy of Allan Morse Penfield, P. A. 1904. 

The George B. Knapp Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1914 by a legacy of Miss Katharine Knapp. 

The Morris L. Glazer Scholarship Fund of $100 was estab- 
lished in 1918 by a gift of Morris L. Glazer, Class of 1917. 

The James Greenleaf Fuller Memorial Scholarship of $200 is 
sustained by Samuel Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, in memory of his 
brother, and is available during his Senior year for a student 
of limited means, who in the judgment of the Principal embodies 
the best ideals of school life in scholarship, character, and 
influence. 

The Class of 1871 Andover -Harvard Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by Henry S. Van Duzer, P. A. 1871, is awarded on the 
basis of high scholarship to a member of the Senior class who is 
preparing for Harvard; the award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his record 
up to that time. 

The Class of 1871 Harvard- Andover Scholarship of $300, also 
sustained by Henry S. Van Duzer, is available for a graduate of 
Phillips Academy during his Freshman year in Harvard Col- 
lege; the award, based on high scholarship, is made by the 
faculty of Phillips Academy, and is announced at the close of 
the recipient's Senior year in the school. 

89 



The Henry P. Wright Scholarship of $300, sustained by an 
alumnus of the Academy in memory of Henry P. Wright, P. A. 
1863, late dean of Yale College, is awarded on the basis of high 
scholarship and character to a member of the Senior Class who 
is preparing for Yale. The award is announced at the close 
of the student's Upper Middle year, on the basis of his 
record up to that time. 

The Winston Trowbridge Townsend Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by John A. Keppelman, P. A. 1897, in memory of his class- 
mate and friend, Winston Trowbridge Townsend, is awarded 
at graduation to that member of the Senior class preparing for 
Yale, who, in the judgment of the Principal, is entitled, through 
scholarship, character, and influence, to special commendation. 

The Howard W. Beal Memorial Scholarship of $200, sustained 
by a member of the class of 1894, is awarded annually by the 
Principal to a worthy student of limited means. 

The Robert Henry Coleman Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$6000 was established in 1919 by Mrs. John Coleman in memory 
of her son, Robert Henry Coleman, P. A. 1912, who died in the 
service of his country in the Great War. The annual income 
from this fund (approximately $300) is awarded, at the end of 
his Junior year, to a student of limited means, who, in the judg- 
ment of the Principal, has displayed the most promise of main- 
taining the highest standard of worth, measured by character, 
scholarship, and general influence in the school. 

The George Webster Otis Scholarship of $250, sustained by 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Otis in memory of their son George 
Webster Otis of the Class of 1914, who died in the military 
service of his country, is awarded to a student who in the 
judgment of the Principal combines the qualities of sound 
character and high ambition. 

The George Xavier McLanahan Memorial Fund of $10,000 
in memory of George Xavier McLanahan of the class of 1892, 



40 



was established in 1919 by his mother and sister. The In- 
come is to be used for the assistance of a worthy student, or 
students, of limited means. 

The Gordon Ferguson Allen Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$5000 was established in 1920 by friends of the school, and the 
income is available for a deserving student of character and 
promise, and of limited means. 

The LeRoy Martin Scholarship of $500, sustained by a brother, 
is available for a Phillips Academy graduate of limited means 
during his Freshman year in Yale University : the award is made 
by the Principal at the close of the recipient's Senior year in the 
school and on the basis of character and ability. 

The Rev. William Henry and Ellen Cary Haskell Scholarship 
Fund of $3,000 was established in 1920 through the contribu- 
tions of the Rev. William Henry Haskell, P. A. 1856, and his sons, 
Dr. Nelson C. Haskell, P. A. 1883, William S. Haskell, P. A. 
1888, the estate of Dr. Pearl Tenney Haskell, P. A. 1888, Dr. 
Harris B. Haskell, P. A. 1890, and Edward Kirk Haskell, P. A. 
1895; the income to be used in aiding a needy and deserving 
student to meet the regular expenses of the school. 

The Roger C. Sullivan Scholarships were founded in 1921 by 
Boetius H. Sullivan, P. A. 1905, in memory of his father. Four 
scholarships of $300 each are awarded annually to those mem- 
bers of the Junior, Lower Middle, Upper Middle, and Senior 
Classes respectively who have made the greatest improvement 
in scholarship during the school year. The awards are made in 
June and the scholarships become available to the recipients 
during the following academic year. 

The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship of fifty dollars 
is awarded annually to a member of the Academy, preference 
being given to a son of a member of the association. 



41 



The John Reed Williams Scholar ship is available to Phillips 
Academy graduates at Yale under the following terms of gift: 

"The income from the John Reed Williams Fund of one thousand dollars, 
* * * is awarded annually at the close of Freshman or Sophomore year, * * * 
to a member of the Academic Freshman or Sophomore class, preferably from 
Phillips Academy, Andover, who is helping to support himself by his own efforts 
and has proved himself to be a man of high character, and of large promise, 
especially in English Literature or History." 

The Columbia University Scholarship. A scholarship, which 
practically amounts to the tuition charges, is granted by Colum- 
bia University each year to a student of Phillips Academy who 
has satisfied the full requirements for admission to the College, 
and whose standing in the Academy has been of sufficiently 
high grade to gain the recommendation of the school faculty. 
The scholarship may be renewed in the years following the 
Freshman year if a high grade is maintained. 

The Wesleyan University Scholarship. Wesleyan University 
grants each year to a student of Phillips Academy going to the 
University a scholarship equal in amount to the tuition bill 
of the Freshman year. Provided the quality of his work 
warrants it, the scholarship is renewed each year throughout 
the college course. The award is made to that student whose 
high scholarship, in the opinion of the Academy Faculty, en- 
titles him to the scholarship. 

In addition to these scholarships, prizes amounting to $1105.00 
are awarded annually. 



PRIZES 

The following prizes are offered annually for proficiency in 
the work of the several departments: 

IN ENGLISH 

The Draper Prizes for Selected Declamations, founded in 1866 
by the late Warren F. Draper, of the class of 1843, of Andover. 



42 



Prizes of thirty dollars and of twenty dollars are awarded. 
The competition is open to all students. A preliminary trial 
before a committee is held early in February, the final compet- 
itors being chosen on the basis of the best rendered selec- 
tions. The fifty-sixth competition occurred March 2, 1922. 

The Means Prizes for Original Declamations, founded in 1867 
by the late William G. Means, of Boston. Prizes of twenty- 
five dollars, of fifteen dollars, and of ten dollars are awarded. 
Students in any class may compete. Eight are selected for the 
final competition by the judges who later act as a committee 
of award, the prizes being given on the merits of both composi- 
tion and delivery. The fifty -fifth competition was held March 
15, 1922. 

The Robinson Prizes for Debate, founded in 1896 by the late 
H. S. Robinson, of Andover, are open to three members of the 
Philomathean debating society and a team chosen from the 
school. A prize of thirty dollars is awarded to the representa- 
tives presenting the better argument, irrespective of the merits 
of the question. The twenty-sixth competition occurred May 
29, 1922. 

The Andrew Potter Prizes, sustained since 1904 by James 
Tracy Potter, of the class of 1890, in memory of his father and 
brother. Two prizes of thirty dollars and twenty dollars 
respectively are offered to those members of the graduating 
class who shall deliver, at the Commencement exercises in June, 
the best essays on assigned subjects. The competition is open 
to Seniors. The nineteenth competition was held June 14, 1922. 

The Schweppe Prizes, sustained by Charles H. Schweppe of 
the class of 1898. Two prizes, one of thirty dollars and one of 
twenty dollars, are awarded for excellence in English, and are 
open to members of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. The 
tenth competition occurred in June, 1922. 



43 



The Goodhue English Prizes, established in 1916 by the family 
of the late Francis A. Goodhue, of Andover, in memory of his 
devotion to Phillips Academy. Two prizes are offered, one of 
fifteen dollars and one of ten dollars, for excellence in English 
literature and composition, including the more practical topics 
of elementary rhetoric. The competition is open to members 
of the Senior and Upper Middle classes. 

The Charles C. Clough Memorial Prize, founded in 1923 by 
friends of Charles C. Clough of the class of 1906, in memory of 
his interest in literary studies and of his devotion to Phillips 
Academy. A prize of twenty-five dollars is awarded to the 
member of the Senior Class who writes the best original essay 
on an assigned literary subject. 

IN GREEK 

The Joseph Cook Greek Prizes, founded in 1879 by the late 
Joseph Cook, D.D., of the class of 1857. The prizes are twenty, 
fifteen, and ten dollars respectively. The special topics in- 
cluded in the forty -fifth competition, June, 1924, will be trans- 
lations at sight: 

1. From Homer. 

2. From Attic Greek Prose. 

There will also be questions on Greek literature and antiquities. 

IN LATIN 

The Dove Latin Prizes, sustained from 1880 to 1908 by the 
late George W. W. Dove, of the class of 1853, of Andover, and 
continued by his sons. The prizes of twenty, fifteen, and ten 
dollars are awarded for excellence in Latin and are open to 
Seniors. 



IN THE CLASSICS 



The Valpey Classical Prizes, founded in 1893 by the late Rev. 
Thomas G. Valpey, of the class of 1854. Two prizes of ten 
dollars each are awarded; one for excellence in Latin Composi- 
tion, one for excellence in Greek Composition. The competi- 
tion is open to members of the Upper Middle class. The 
twenty-seventh competition occurred in June, 1922. 

IN MATHEMATICS 

The Comers Mathematical Prizes, founded in 1897 by the late 
E. B. Convers, of the class of 1857, of Englewood, N. J. 
Three prizes of twenty dollars, fifteen dollars, and ten dollars 
are awarded for excellence in the mathematics of the Classical 
Department, to be determined by an examination held in May. 

IN PHYSICS 

The Wadsworth Prize, sustained since 1900 by William S. 
Wadsworth, M.D., of the class of 1887. A prize of ten dollars is 
awarded to that member of the Scientific Department who has 
obtained the highest rank in Physics for the year. 

IN GERMAN 

The Robert Stevenson German Prize, founded in 1904 by Robert 
Stevenson, Jr., of the class of 1896, in memory of his father. A 
prize of twelve dollars is awarded for excellence in German 
Composition. The competition is open to Seniors and Upper 
Middlers of both departments. 

The John Aiken German Prizes, two prizes, one of twenty dol- 
lars and one of ten dollars, are sustained by a member of the 
class of 1873 in memory of John Aiken, a member of the Board 
of Trustees from 1845 to 1863. The competition is open to 
Seniors and Upper Middlers of both departments, and the 
examination, based on which the prizes are awarded, will con- 



45 



tain questions on German geography, a specified period of 
German history, the lives and writings of German authors 
previously assigned, and one or more passages of German prose 
or poetry for translation into English. 

IN FRENCH 

The Frederic Holkins Taylor Prize was founded in 1908 by an 
anonymous friend of the class of 1868. A prize of eight dollars 
is awarded for excellence in French conversation or French 
composition. 

IN CHEMISTRY 

The Dalton Prize in Chemistry, a prize of fifty dollars, founded 
in 1915 by Frederick Goodrich Crane, P. A. 1884, is awarded 
annually to that student maintaining the highest rank in 
Chemistry for the year. 

IN HISTORY 

The George Lauder Prize was founded in memory of George 
Lauder of the class of P. S. 1897. A prize of fifty dollars is 
awarded for excellence in English History. 

FOR ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

The Butler-Thwing Prize, a prize of fifteen dollars, founded 
by Capt. Francis Butler-Thwing of the class of 1908, is 
awarded annually to that member of the Junior class who has 
secured the highest average in his examinations for entrance 
to the Academy. 

FOR HIGH SCHOLARSHIP 

The Faculty Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, founded by San- 
ford H. E. Freund, P. A. 1897, is awarded annually to that mem- 
ber of the graduating class who has attained the highest general 
average in scholarship. 



46 



IN ATTENDANCE 

The John P. Hopkins Prize of $300, founded in 1921 by 
Boetius H. Sullivan, P. A. 1905, is awarded annually to that 
member of the student body whose record for the school year 
is free from demerit, absence, and tardy marks. In case more 
than one candidate shall have met the terms of this requirement 
the award shall be determined by the Faculty and on the basis of 
the general records of the candidates. In case no student is 
found to have completed the year free from demerit, absence, and 
tardy marks, the Faculty shall determine which candidate has 
most nearly met the terms of the requirements as specified and 
shall make the award accordingly. 

IN GENERAL EXCELLENCE 

The Fuller Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, sustained by Samuel 
Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, is awarded at his graduation to that 
member of the class who has best exemplified and upheld in 
his work and life at Andover the ideals and traditions of Phillips 
Academy. Only those who have been members of the school 
for at least two full academic years are eligible for this prize. 

The Otis Prize, a prize of fifty dollars, is sustained by Joseph 
E.Otis, P. A. 1888, and is awarded to that member of the Senior 
class who, having been a member of the school for at least three 
years, has, in the judgment of the Faculty, shown the greatest 
general improvement. 

The Boston Yale Club Cup is awarded annually by the Yale 
Club of Boston to that member of the Senior class who attains 
the highest proficiency in scholarship and athletics. 

The Federation of Harvard Clubs Prize. The New England 
Federation of Harvard Clubs will award at Commencement a set 
of books of some standard author to that member of the Upper 
Middle class who is preparing for college, and whom the Prin- 
cipal, after consultation with the Faculty, shall deem most 
worthy by reason of high scholarship and character. 

47 



5YNOP5I5 OF THE COURSE OF STUDY 



As the subjects are taught with a view to the student's pro- 
gressive development, it is desirable for him to take the entire 
course in the Academy. In recent years the Academy has been 
forced to limit rigidly the number admitted to its Senior classes. 
In order that the student may plan his work to the greatest 
advantage, it is important that he decide as early as possible 
upon the higher institution which he intends to enter. The 
course of study is designed to furnish adequate preparation for 
any college or scientific school. 



THE CLASSICAL COURSE 

— JUNIOR CLASS III — LOWER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 

a week Required a week 

5 English 2 4 

2 French 2 4 

5 Latin 2 5 

5 German 1 or Greek 1 4 

17 17 



CLASS IV 



Required 
Algebra 1 
English 1 
French 1 
Latin 1 



Hours 

Required a week 
Algebra 2 4 
English 3 4 
Latin 3 5 
j German 2 4 
[or Greek 2 5 



17 or 18 



CLASS II — UPPER MIDDLE 





Hours 


Elective 


a week 


Chemistry 


°4 


French 3 


4 


German 1 


4 


Greek 1 


4 


American History 


5 


^Ancient History 


5 


English History 


5 


Physics 


°4 


Spanish 1 


4 



Hours 

Elective a week 

Bible 2 
Greek Testament 1 
Classical History 2 
Geography 2 



Numbers placed at the right and above a subject indicate successive courses in the same 
subject. The courses are described on pages 52-63. References are to footnotes on page 49. 



48 



CLASS I — SENIOR 



Required 
English 4 
Plane Geometry 
Electives 







Hours 




Hours 


awsek 


Elective 


a week 


t-tl€CiXVt 


a week 


4 


Algebra 3 


2 






4 


Chemistry 


°4 


Bible 


2 


10 


Mechanical Drawing f3 


Biology 3 ^ 1 


°4 




French 3 


4 




2 


18 


German 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


v-t^i mail 


2 




Greek 1 or ° 


4 


Greek Testament 






Greek 2 


5 


x lax i_i_iv.;i l y 


2 




American History 


5 


Horace 


} 




J Ancient History 


5 


vjcvfgi. a l> 1 1 y 


2 




English History 


5 


Philosophy 


2 




Latin 4 


4 


i li uul oyca&iiiA 


2 




Latin Composition 


1 








Physics ggj 


°4 








Spanish 1 or 2 jfc> 


4 








Trigonometry and 


i 








Solid Geometry 


4 







THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



CLASS IV — JUNIOR 



Required 
Algebra 1 
English 1 
I (French 1 
Latin 1 



Hours 
a week 

5 

2 

5 

5 



CLASS C 

Required 
Algebra 2 
English 2 
1 1 French 2 
Latin 2 



LOWER MIDDLE 
Hour 
a wee 



17 



17 



♦Open to those who have credit for Physics or Chemistry. 

"Each laboratory period occupies two hours, but, not requiring home study, counts only 
one hour on the schedule. 

fMechanical Drawing takes six hours of class-room time, but, not requiring home 
preparation, counts only three hours on the schedule. 

tNot open to those who elect Classical History. 

1 1 German may be chosen in place of French. 



4!) 



CLASS B — UPPER MIDDLE 



Hours Hours 
Required a week Elective a week 



English 3 4 


French 1 or 3 


4 


Chemistry or Physics °4 


German 1 or 8 


4 


Plane Geometry 5 


American History 


5 


Electives 4 or 5 


Ancient History 


5 




English History 


5 


17 or 18 


Latin 3 


5 




Spanish 1 


4 




Bible 


2 




Geography 


2 



CLASS A — SENIOR 





Hours 




Hours 




Hours 


Required 


a week 


Elective 


a week 


Elective 


a week 


English 4 


4 


Algebra 3 


2 


Archaeology 


1 


History 


5 


Chemistry 


°4 


Bible 


2 


Trigonometry 




Mechanical Drawing f3 


Biology* 


°4 


and Solid Geometry 4 


French 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


French 4 


2 


Electives 


5 


German 1 , 2 , or 3 


4 


German 4 


2 






American History 


5 


Harmony 


2 




18 


Ancient History 


5 


Geography 


2 






English History 


5 


Philosophy 


2 






Latin 4 


4 


Public Speaking 


2 






Physics 


°4 










Spanish 1 or 2 


4 







Physical Training (4 hours a week) is required of all students. 

All Seniors must report to the Librarian for instruction in the use of the library. 



In order to define the work of the pupil in his Senior year, Upper Middlera are required 
to take preliminary examinations for some college. June examinations, both preliminary 
and final, are held in Andover by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

For references see footnotes on page 49. 



.50 



STATEMENTS OF COURSES 



GREEK 

The first year (Greek 1 ) is devoted mainly to forms and the 
most essential principles of syntax. Benner and Smyth's Be- 
ginners Greek Book is used. To aid the memorizing of inflec- 
tions and vocabularies there are daily exercises, both oral and 
written, enforced by incessant drill. During the second and 
third terms work in the grammar is supplemented by lessons 
from a very simple Greek Reader. 

The second year (Greek 2 ) is occupied with Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-IV, or an equivalent, with sight reading, 
translation from English into Greek, and grammar reviews. 
Great effort is made to secure simple, idiomatic English in both 
oral and written work. Grammar and composition are studied 
throughout the year and occupy a part of every recitation 
period. 

There is an elective course in the Greek Testament — one 
hour a week — open to both Upper Middlers and Seniors. 

The third year (Greek 3 ) is spent mainly in reading selected 
books of the Iliad and the Odyssey. After the dialect is mas- 
tered, more attention is given to the literary side of the poems 
and to the translation of Homer at sight, about 5000 verses 
being read during the year. 

LATIN 

The first year (Latin 1 ) is occupied with the mastery of such 
vocabulary, inflexions, and syntax as the better manuals for 
beginners provide. There is constant practice in the reading 
and writing of simple prose, and in observing the relation of 
Latin to English words. The course aims at a thoroughly 
dependable foundation for subsequent reading and study. 

51 



In the second year (Latin 2 ) Books I-IV (or equivalents in 
selections) of the Gallic War of Caesar, and five or six Lives of 
Nepos, are studied, with emphasis upon subject-matter, syntax, 
and vocabulary. Twenty per cent, of the total time allotted 
to the course is given to prose composition based upon the texts 
read. There is continual practice in sight translation. 

In the third year (Latin 3 ) the course in Cicero aims to make 
the student familiar with the chief characteristics of Cicero's 
oratory, with his life, and with the history and antiquities of 
his time. The work in Latin prose composition is devoted to 
connected narrative. The orations against Catiline, for the 
Manilian Law, for Archias, for Marcellus, or for Milo, or 
Sallust's Catiline are read. There is also sight reading and 
practice in reading aloud. 

In the fourth year (Latin 4 ) diction and prosody receive at- 
tention and every effort is made to cultivate a sympathetic 
appreciation of good literature. Books I- VI of the Aeneid, and 
selections from the Bucolics, or from the Metamorphoses of Ovid, 
are read, with practice in reading at sight. Topics in the private 
life and customs of the Romans are studied and illustrated. 

FRENCH 

The first year's work (French 1 ) comprises the principles of 
pronunciation, drill in the fundamentals of grammar includ- 
ing the inflections of the regular and the more common 
irregular verbs, of nouns, of adjectives, of participles, of pro- 
nouns; the uses of pronouns, the simple uses of the conditional 
and subjunctive, and the elementary rules of syntax; abundant 
easy exercises for oral translation into French, and the reading 
of about two hundred pages of easy French prose. The follow- 
ing texts have been used. Kuhn's Reader, Super's, Reader, Aid- 
rich and Foster's Reader, La Tulipe Noire, L* Et6 de la Saint- 
Martin, Sans Famille, and the new Fraser and Squair's Grammar. 

The second-year course (French 2 ) of four hours completes the 
elementary work in French and prepares for the College Board 

52 



examinations hi Elementary French. It includes a review of 
elementary grammar and continued work in composition and 
translation. Such texts as Colombo,, La M&e de la Marquise, 
Le Roi des Montagues, Syntax of the the French Verb, and Com- 
fort's Composition have been used. 

The third year (French 3 ) covers the requirement of the Col- 
lege Board in Intermediate French. Contes de Daudet, La 
DSbdcle, Les MisSrables, and similar texts furnish material for 
translation, and work in composition and grammar is done 
throughout the year. 

The fourth-year work (French 4 ) consists of rapid reading and 
translation of selected passages from English authors, with dis- 
cussion of helpful topics in French history and literature as they 
come in the course. This course is for those who have passed 
the college examinations and who wish to continue their work 
in the language. 

GERMAN 

The first year's work (German 1 ) includes a constant drill in 
pronunciation and a thorough course in elementary grammar. 
Abundant easy exercises are translated into German and used as 
the basis of oral and aural practice. A limited amount of mem- 
orizing of German idioms and poetry, and translation from Ger- 
man into English are required. Wesselhoeft's Elementary 
German Grammar, and Bacon's German Composition have 
been used in this work. 

The second-year course (German 2 ) completes the preparation 
for the College Board examination in Elementary German. 
It comprises a thorough review of the grammar and a con- 
siderable amount of more advanced translation and composition. 
Conversational work is continued by the use of such helps as 
Pattou's An American in Germany, Ham and Leonard's 
German Grammar, and Whitney and Stroebe's Easy German 
Composition have been used in this course and various tests like 
Wildenbruch's Das edle Blut, Gerstacker's Irrfahrten, Burk- 



53 



hard's German Poems, Riehl's Der Fluch der Schonheit, and 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell are read. 

The third year's work (German 3 ) prepares for the examina- 
tion in Intermediate German as set by the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. Grammar is rapidly reviewed and advanced 
composition written throughout the year. Bernstorff's Hand- 
book of German Grammar, Ham and Leonard's German Gram- 
mar, and Pope's composition books have been used in this 
connection. Oral work is continued, and such texts as Frey- 
tag's Die J ournalisten, Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea, Keller's 
Kleider machen Leute, and Schiller's Der Dreissigjdhrige Krieg 
III are studied. 

The fourth-year course (German 4 ) of two hours a week is 
open to those who have secured credit for three years of German, 
and, upon consultation with the instructor, to others who satisfy 
him of their ability. The course will be adapted to the maturity 
of the students and their proficiency in German. Half the time 
will be spent in conversational practice on everyday topics and 
German life and institutions, the remainder in rapid reading and 
interpretation of some phase of German literature. Wagner's 
Tannhduser has been studied and the original Middle High 
German poems of the old singers discussed and put into modern 
German. Students in this course are not recommended for ad- 
ditional college credits in German. 

SPANISH 

The first year's work (Spanish 1 ) is as follows: — (a) thorough 
drill in the principles of pronunciation; (b) rules of syntax and 
essentials of Spanish grammar including the inflection of verbs 
(regular and irregular), nouns, adjectives, pronouns, the uses of 
the conditional and subjunctive; (c) abundant easy exercises for 
translation into Spanish; (d) the translation of two hundred or 
more pages of easy Spanish prose, such as is contained in Hills' 
Spanish Tales, Berge-Soler and Hatheway's Reader, Morrison's 
Tres Comedias, Alarc6n's Short Stories, Isaac's Maria, and 



54 



Supple's Spanish Reader; grammars such as De Vitis', Hills 
and Ford's, Crawford's First Book in Spanish, and Moreno- 
Lacalle's Elemenios dc Espanol. 

The second-year course (Spanish 2 ) completes the elementary 
course in Spanish, and prepares for the College Board exami- 
nation in this subject. It consists of a complete review of Span- 
ish grammar and continued work in composition and translation. 
Such texts as Wilkins's Second Spanish Book, El Capitdn Veneno, 
Jose, Zaragiieta, and Umphrey's Spanish Prose Composition 
have been used. 

ENGLISH 

The work of English 1 in composition is based on themes, — 
simple narratives and descriptions — written in the class-room. 
Attention is given to the correction of grammatical errors in 
speech and writing, with necessary consideration of formal 
grammar; to elementary matters of the structure and the 
punctuation of the sentence; to spelling; and to the a< quisition 
of a vocabulary. The work in literature consists in reading 
aloud and discussing in the class-room a few short works in 
verse and prose. Considerable emphasis is placed on enuncia- 
tion and pronunciation. (Students planning to enter the 
Lower Middle class in English are advised to read St. Ives, 
Nicholas Nickleby, and Les Miserables, but equivalents will be 
accepted.) 

In the teaching of composition in English 2 , the general plan 
of the preceding year is continued, with a somewhat higher 
standard of requirement, the chief object being to secure plenty 
of practice. Themes are written outside of the class-room as 
well as during the recitation period. The study of some elemen- 
tary matters of rhetoric is begun. 

The textbook used for the work in composition is Ward's 
Sentence and Theme. The study of literature comprises the 
careful reading of some books and the rapid reading of others. 
Among the books prescribed are: Richard II, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 



55 



Hyde, The Woman in White, The Virginian, and English Narra- 
tive Poems (Fuess and Sanborn). Particular attention is given 
to oral English, each student being required to deliver two care- 
fully prepared speeches each term and to read aloud in the 
class-room as frequently as possible. 

In English 3 the thorough study of formal rhetoric is begun. 
As many themes as possible are written outside of the class- 
room, and considerable writing is done in the class-room. The 
textbook used is Herrick and Damon's New Composition and 
Rhetoric. The course in literature includes the careful reading 
of six or seven books, selected in part from the list for reading (A) 
prescribed in the College Entrance Requirements; the lives 
of the authors; and the rapid reading, optional or required, of as 
many other books as possible. 

In English 4 the principles of composition-rhetoric studied 
in the preceding year are reviewed, with a higher standard of 
requirement in their application to writing. Herrick and 
Damon's New Composition and Rhetoric is used in this year also. 
Frequent themes and writing in the class-room are required. 
The course in literature includes the rapid reading of some books 
and the careful study of others; the life and times of the chief 
authors; and as much supplementary reading as possible. The 
work of this year completes the preparation for the compre- 
hensive examination offered by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Public Speaking is taken up as part of the Lower Middle 
English course. 

An elective course in Public Speaking comprises training in 
the preparation and delivery of expositions, argumentative 
speeches, and debates. A considerable amount of oral reading 
and extemporaneous speaking is done throughout the course. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 
In the two curriculum courses the Bible is studied as an 
English classic. Attention is constantly given to the Biblical 

56 



sources of common quotations and allusions. The methods and 
standards are those of the other school studies. Each of the 
courses extends through a year, with two recitation periods each 
week. 

The first course (Bible 1 ) consists of nearly all the Old Testa- 
ment narratives. The textbook is Sheffield's The Old Testament 
Narrative. If time allows, selections from the New Testament 
are taken up in the spring term. 

The second course (Bible 2 ) includes the historical books of 
the Old Testament and numerous selections from the poetical 
and prophetical writings. The textbook is the complete Old 
Testament in the King James version as published in four 
volumes in "Everyman's Library" under the title Ancient 
Hebrew Literature. 

ALGEBRA 

Algebra 1 . The study of Algebra is begun in the Junior 
year in a course occupying five hours a week throughout 
the year. Slaught & Lennes's Elementary Algebra is used as a 
textbook and Chapters I-XI and XIII-XVIII, omitting imagi- 
nary numbers, are completed. 

Algebra 2 . This course provides a review of Algebra 1 
and continues the subject through all the usual topics of Ele- 
mentary and Intermediate Algebra. It is required in Class C 
and in Class II. Candidates for entrance to the Academy 
desiring credit for this course must present a college entrance 
certificate giving credit for both Elementary and Intermediate 
Algebra. 

Algebra 3 . This course covers the topics in Advanced 
Algebra specified by the College Entrance Examination 
Board and meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and 
scientific schools. If not offered for admission it may be used 
to secure advanced credit at some colleges. 

GEOMETRY 
Demonstrative Plane Geometry is begun and completed in the 
Upper Middle year of the Scientific Course and in the Senior 

57 



year of the Classical Course. Four, or five, recitations a week 
are given to the subject. The chief aim of the instruction is to 
develop in each student the ability to reason clearly and logically. 
Accuracy, clearness, and completeness of statement are insisted 
upon. To develop originality and independence of thought 
about two-thirds of the time is devoted to the solution of exer- 
cises of gradually increasing difficulty. Candidates for entrance 
to the Academy may secure credit for this course by presenting 
a college entrance certificate giving credit for it. 

In the Senior year Solid Geometry is taught four hours a 
week during the winter term and two hours during the spring 
term. The course meets the entrance requirements of all col- 
leges and scientific schools, and, when not offered for admission, 
may be substituted for Freshman work in the subject. 

TRIGONOMETRY 
A course in Plane Trigonometry meeting four hours a week 
during the fall term and two hours during the spring term, forms, 
with Solid Geometry, a full four-hour course for the Senior year. 
It meets the entrance requirements of all colleges and scientific 
schools, and may be substituted for Freshman work in the 
subject, if not used toward admission. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 
This course consists of six hours a week. It includes the use 
of drawing instruments, lettering, geometric constructions, 
orthographic and isometric projections, developments, inter- 
sections, sectioning, and working drawings. Especial stress is 
laid on a thorough mastering of the fundamentals. The course 
meets the requirements of the College Entrance Examination 
Board and in many instances so prepares the student that he 
can obtain advance credit for the subject on his entrance to 
college. Students of exceptional ability are given an oppor- 
urnity to do the more advanced work in Machine Drawing, 
or are given problems in keeping with the course to be pursued 
after entrance to college. 

58 



PHYSICS 

The instruction in Physics is given by the use of a textbook 
and by practical work in the laboratory. The text is accom- 
panied with numerical examples and by qualitative experiments 
designed to illustrate physical laws and their application to 
practical life. 

Forty or more quantitative laboratory experiments are re- 
quired of each pupil. A careful record of the steps and results 
of these exercises is kept in a note-book which is submitted to 
the instructor for approval. 

CHEMISTRY 

The sections of the class in Chemistry, each meeting four 
times a week, cover the same ground and prepare for the 
entrance examinations in Chemistry of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

A two-hour course throughout the year prepares for the Col- 
lege Board examination in this subject and counts one half 
point toward admission to such colleges as do not require 
specified laboratory work. It does not meet the one point 
requirement in the subject. 

The work is so arranged that students may profitably enter 
the class at almost any time in the year, and those who have pre- 
viously covered the ground may review the entire subject during 
the spring term. 

ARCHAEOLOGY 

The work of the department is chiefly confined to the United 
States, and research in other subjects than American archaeology 
is not extensively attempted. 

At present the collections number about 120,000 specimens, 
all of which represent the stone age art. 



59 



The publications of the department number seven: — Bulletin 
No. 1, on the Exploration of Jacob's Cavern; No. 2, The Gor- 
gets; No. 3, Field Work in Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, Arizona, 
and New Mexico; No. 4, The Exploration of Bushey Cavern and 
the Exploration of Fort Ancient; No. 5, A Study and Descrip- 
tion of the Seven Prehistoric Earthworks found near Andover; 
No. 6, A Study of Hematite Implements found in the United 
States. No. 7, Archaeological Explorations in the State of Maine. 

HISTORY 

Courses are offered in Ancient History, English History, 
and American History. 

PHILOSOPHY 

The first term is devoted to talks on Greek Philosophy and 
the reading of Berkeley's Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous; 
the second to talks on Mediaeval Philosophy, Ethics, and the 
reading of Fichte's Vocation of Man; the third to talks on 
Modern Philosophy, Psychology, and the reading of Hume's 
Enquiry concerning Human Understanding. Text-books used 
are: Webb, History of Philosophy; Thilly, Introduction to Ethics; 
and James, Shorter Course in Psychology. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

All students are required to take some form of exercise during 
the school year. Upon entering the school each boy receives 
a careful physical and medical examination, and a form of 
exercise suited to his peculiar needs is advised. Special atten- 
tion is given to those who lack normal development. The 
school, club, and squad teams give all students an opportunity 
co compete in sports with those of their own relative ability. 
No student is allowed to compete on school teams unless per- 
mission indicating his fitness is received from the Physical 
Director. 

60 



MUSIC 



Opportunity for the study of piano and organ is offered by 
the Department of Music. The piano instruction is in charge 
of Messrs. Felix Fox and Harrison Potter of Boston. The organ 
lessons are given by the Director of Music. 

A two-hour course in Harmony has been added to the curric- 
ulum as an elective. 

Students who sing in the choir, every member attending two 
rehearsals a week, are offered one of three forms of compen- 
sation: (a) financial; (b) one athletic or chapel cut a week; 
(c) permission to count the choir work as one schedule-hour. 

Serious attention is given the school orchestra which re- 
hearses weekly and studies carefully both classical and modern 
compositions. 

The following recitals were given in the school chapel during 
the academic year 1922-1923: November, Boston Symphony 
Ensemble; December, Christmas recital of music for harp, 
violin, cello, and organ; January, organ recital by M. Marcel 
Dupre of Notre Dame, Paris; February, piano recital by Mr. 
Harrison Potter of Boston; violoncello recital by M. Jean 
Bedetti, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra; March, organ 
and song recital by Mr. Herrmann Keller, organ, Mrs. Emma 
Tester, soprano, Miss Meta Diestel, contralto, from Stuttgart, 
Germany; April, Musical Clubs concert; May, joint concert 
by the Boston Symphony Ensemble, the choirs of Bradford and 
Phillips Academies, in Bach's cantata, Sleepers, Wake, for Night 
is Flying, Mr. Felix Fox, piano, Mr. Pfatteicher, organ; June, 
Commencement recital by Mr. Pfatteicher. 

On the Wednesday afternoons of the winter term a course 
was given by the Director of Music on the Wagnerian Opera, 
the course being illustrated by piano, organ, reproducing 
machine, voice, and violin. 

61 



AWARD OF PRIZES, 1921-1922 



The Draper (1) Francis Verigan, Hampton, Va. 

Prizes (2) Joseph Verner Reed, Denver, Colo. 

The Means (1) Donald Spencer, Cambridge. 

Prizes (2) Loren Hart Loomis, New Haven, Conn. 

(3) Howard Finney, Jr., Upper Montclair, N. J. 

The Charles Hastings Willard, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Robinson Smith Davison Turner, Jr., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Prizes Adolph Bernard Loveman, Birmingham, Ala. 

The Andrew (1) Donald Spencer, Cambridge. 

Potter Prizes (2) Everett Stearns Noble, Denver, Colo. 

The (1) Donald Eaton Carr, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Schweppe Prizes (2) Henry Forbush Howe, Cohasset. 



The 

Goodhue Prizes 

The 
Joseph Cook- 
Prizes 

The 
Dove Prizes 



The 
Valpey Prizes 

The 

Corners Prizes 



(1) Henry Forbush Howe, Cohasset. 

(2) Harry Gaylord Dorman, Jr., Beirut, Syria. 

(1) Harry Gaylord Dorman, Jr., Beirut, Syria. 

(2) Henry Mann Silver, New York, N. Y. 

(3) George Chadbourne Taylor, Jr., Pelham, N. Y. 

(1) Carlos Eben Allen, Jr., Valley City, N. D. 

(2) Eugene Edward Blazier, Jr., Portland, Oregon. 

(3) Walton Porter Doggett, East Dedham. 

Latin — George Buckingham Beecher, Hillsboro, Ohio. 
Greek— Carlos Eben Allen, Jr., Valley City, N. D. 

fl) Richard Boyle O'Reilly Hocking, Cambridge. 

(2) John Werner Stevens, Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

(3) Edward Rich Vose, East Eddington, Maine. 



The 
Wadsworth 
Prize 



The 

Robert Stevenson 
German Prize 



The 
John Aiken 
German Prizes 



William Plummer Lowell, Jr., Newburyport. 

Henry Charles Renouf, Andover. 

Honorable Mention 
Stanley deJongh Osborne, Guatemala City, Guatemala, 
and 

Harry Gaylord Dorman, Jr., Beirut, Syria. 

(1) Stanley deJongh Osborne, Guatemala City, Guatemala, 

(2) Henry Charles Renouf, Andover. 

62 



The 

Frederic Holkins 
Taylor Prize 

A 

Prize in 
American History 

The Washington 
and 

Franklin Medal 
The 

George Lander 
History Prize 

The Dalion 
Chemistry Prize 

A Prize 
in Philosophy 

A Prize in 
Mechanical Drawing 

The 
Faculty Prize 

The 
Fuller Prize 

The 
Otis Prize 

The 

Butler- Thwing Prize 
The 

Boston Yale Club 
Cup 

The 
Junior Class 
Athletic Cup 

The New England 
Federation of 
Harvard Clubs Prize 

The 

Harvard- Andover 
Scholarships 



Nicholas Guyot Cameron, Princeton, N. J. 
Charles Shaw Bradeen, Essex, Conn. 

Charles Shaw Bradeen, Essex. Conn. 

Edward Clarence Mack, New York, X. Y. 
Honorable Mention 
William Alton Riley, North Attleboro. 

Robert Ober Clark, Winnetka, 111. 
Ralph Manning Crowley, Madison, Wise. 
Louie Gustave Wienecke, Tulsa, Okla. 
Carlos Eben Allen, Jr., Valley City, N. D. 
Horace Wellington Cole, West Newton. 
Richard Derby Elwell, New York, N. Y. 
Henry Severance Sawyer, Dalton. 

Edmund Petrie Cottle, Jr., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Charles Edward Borah, Phoenix, Arizona. 

Frank Watson Newman, Tunkhannock, Penna. 

Joseph Goodman, Jr., Hartford, Conn. 
Benner Creswell Turner, Columbus, Ga. 

63 



The 

James Greenleaf Fuller 
Memorial Scholarship 

The 

Henry P. Wright 
Scholarship 

The Winston 
Trowbridge Townsend 
Scholarship 

The Howard W. Beal 
Memorial 
Scholarship 

The Robert Henry 
Coleman Memorial 
Scholarship 

The 

George Webster Otis 
Scholarship 

The 
George Xavier 
McLanahan 
Scholarship 

The Gordon Ferguson 
Allen Memorial 
Scholarship 

The 
LeRoy Martin 
Scholarship 

The 

Rev. William, Henry 
and 

Ellen Cory Haskell 
Scholarship 

The 

Roger C. Sullivan 
Scholarships 



Allen MacMartin Look, West Tisbury. 



William Arnold Hutchinson, Pepperell. 



Walter Porter Doggett, East Dedham. 



John Paul Dickson, Nantucket. 



Edward Winslow Ames, Jr., Annapolis, Md. 



Frell McDonald Owl, Cherokee, N. C. 



Divided between 
Frank Watson Newman, Tunkhannock, Penna. 
and 

Fred Otis Newman, Tunkhannock, Penna. 



Francis Verigan, Hampton, Va. 



Nicholas Guyot Cameron, Princeton, N. J. 



Nelson Cary Haskell, Jr., Amherst. 



Grant Carpenter Manson, Detroit, Mich. 
Hedley Vicars Cooke, Jr., Orange, N. J. 
George Clarke Watson, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Robert Tilmon Rylee, Memphis, Tenn. 



The 

John P. Hopkins 
Prize 



Donald Broughton Grover, Petersham. 



fi4 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS, 1921-1922 



HONORS OF THE FIRST GRADE 



Awarded to those who have no grade lower than 82 and a grade of at least 92 
in half the number of hours. 



Seniors — 

C. E. Allen, Jr. 
J. Goodman, Jr. 
W. P. Lowell. Jr. 

Upper Middlers — 
F. W. Newman 



3 terms 

1 term 
3 terms 

C. H. Willard 

2 terms 



W. A. Riley 
T. Smitham 
G. C. Taylor, Jr. 
2 terms 

F. O. Newman 



2 terms 
1 term 
1 term 



1 term 



Lower Middlers 
G. A. Eddy 
R. D. Miller 

Juniors — 

E. W. Ames, Jr 



1 term 
1 term 
R. S. Willis, Jr. 

1 term 



G. K. Sanborn 
J. H. Smith 
1 term 

C. E. Borah 



3 terms 
1 term 



1 term 



HONORS OF THE SECOND GRADE 
Awarded to those who have an average of 85 and no grade below 72. 
Seniors — 



r 



E. E. Blazier, Jr. 


3 terms 


B. M. Fisk 


1 term 


G. W. Burr 


1 term 


0. R. Garfield 


1 term 


C. B. Collins 


2 terms 


J. Goodman, Jr. 


1 term 


E. P. Cottle, Jr. 


1 term 


T. Hale, 3d 


2 terms 


K. Creevey 


2 terms 


W. L. Hobson, Jr. 


1 term 


H. S. Crosby 


1 term 


E. C. Mack 


2 terms 


R. M. Crowley 


2 terms 


N. H. Miller 


1 term 


S. H. Curlee, Jr. 


1 term 


W. A. Riley 


1 term 


B. C. Cutler 


1 term 


G. C. Taylor, Jr. 


1 term 




C. H. Willard 


1 term 




»er Middlers — 








J. T. Frenyear 


1 term 


F. 0. Newman 


2 terms 


H. N. Jones 


1 term 


B. C. Turner 


2 terms 


J. S. Little 


1 term 


G. R. Weaver 


1 term 


E. B. Lough 


1 term 


J. M. Westcott, 2d 


1 term 


F. W. Newman 


1 term 


W. C. Wilder 


2 terms 



6.5 



Lower Middlers — 
G. B. Beecher 
J. P. Dickson 
G. A. Eddv 
P. K. Elwell 
E. H. Foster 
N. C. Haskell, Jr. 



1 term 
3 terms 

2 terms 
1 term 
1 term 
1 term 

K. Smith, Jr. 



C. J. Kohler 
R. R. Layton, Jr. 
R. D. Miller 
E. P. Renouf 
S. S. Rowe 
J. H. Smith 
1 term 



2 terms 
1 term 
1 term 

1 term 

2 terms 
2 terms 



Junioks — 

W. Alexander 
E. W. Ames, Jr. 
L. B. Osborne 



1 term 

2 terms 
2 terms 

C. K. Woolsey 



W. G. Poor 
W. C. Ridgway, Jr. 
R. T. Rylee 
2 terms 



1 term 
1 term 
1 term 



SENIOR HONORS 
Class of 1922 

BIBLE 

Kennedy Creevey Grant Carpenter Manson 

CHEMISTRY 

Paul Sherman Bauer Eugene Edward Blazier, Jr. 

Leland Wilson Cummings 

ENGLISH 

Carlos Eben Allen, Jr. Charles Asa Clough, Jr. 

Harry Gaylord Dorman, Jr. 

FRENCH, ADVANCED 

Nicholas Guyot Cameron Noel Henry Miller 

Charles Bingham Collins Sydney Fredrick Thomas 

Joseph Goodman, Jr. Gordon Butler Wadhams 

Charles Hastings Willard 

GEOGRAPHY 

George Chadbourne Taylor, Jr. 

GERMAN, ELEMENTARY 

Charles Bingham Collins Harry Gaylord Dorman, Jr. 

Joseph Goodman, Jr. 

GERMAN, ADVANCED 

Loren Hart Loomis Thomas Smitham 



GREEK. ELEMENTARY 

Carlos Eben Allen, Jr. Charles Hastings Willard 

GREEK, ADVANCED 

Harry Gaylord Dorinan, Jr. George Chadbourne Taylor, J 

HARMONY 

George Warren Hates 

HISTORY, AMERICAN 

Charles Shaw Bradeen Stanley deJongh Osborne 

HISTORY, CLASSICAL 

George Chadbourne Taylor, Jr. 

HISTORY, ENGLISH 

Edward Clarence Mack William Alton Riley 

LATIN 

Carlos Eben Allen, Jr. Eugene Edward Blazier, Jr. 

Thomas Hale, 3d 

MATHEMATICS, ADVANCED ALGEBRA 

Smith Davison Turner, Jr. 

MATHEMATICS, SOLID GEOMETRY 

Ralph Manning Crowley William Plummer Lowell, Jr. 

Owen Richardson Garfield Thomas Smitham 

Joseph Goodman, Jr. Sydney Fredrick Thomas 

Smith Davison Turner, Jr. 

MATHEMATICS, TRIGONOMETRY 

Robert Ober Clark William Plummer Lowell, Jr. 

Edmund Petrie Cottle, Jr. Paul Sanford Seward 

Owen Richardson Garfield Thomas Smitham 

Joseph Goodman, Jr. Sydney Fredrick Thomas 

Charles Hastings Willard 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

James Bray ton Deanc Duryea Elwell Elmendorf 

PHILOSOPHY 

Robert Ober Clark Ralph Manning Crowley 

Physics 

William Plummer Lowell, Jr. Sydney Fredrick Thomas 

SPANISH 

Burnham Morris Fisk Thomas Hale, 3d 

George Chadbourne Taylor, Jr 

67 



CUM LAUDE SOCIETY 



These members of the class of 1922 were elected to membership in the Cum 
I^aude Society on the basis of their superior scholarship in all subjects for their 
Senior year. 

This society aims to bestow that recognition upon high scholarship in the 
preparatory schools which the Phi Beta Kappa Society gives to it in the colleges. 

( arlos Eben Allen, Jr. Thomas Hale, 3d 

Eugene Edward Blazier, Jr. William Plummer Lowell, Jr. 

( harles Bingham Collins Edward Clarence Mack 

Joseph Goodman, Jr. William Alton Riley 

Thomas Smitham 

FROM THE CLASS OF 1921 

George Chadbourne Taylor, Jr. Charles Hastings Willard 



68 



CLASS OF 1922 



The following students, members of the class of 1922 unless otherwise indi- 
cated, have entered college. 

Amherst — Charles Bingham Collins, Burton Payne Gray, Everett Stearns 
Noble, Gerald Beckley Woodruff. 

Bowdoin — Charles Shaw Bradeen, Gordon Bucknam. 

Brown — Arthur Eugene Jensen (1923). 

California Institute of Technology — Meridan Hunt Bennett. 
University of California — Benjamin Kinsell Swartz (1923). 
Colgate — Seymour Sherwood Munro. 
Cornell — Douglas Ripley. 

Dartmouth — Carlos Eben Allen, Jr., William Sylvester Forrest, Jr. (ex- 
1922), James Henry Grady, John Glenn Hartigan, Richard Wellington Hus- 
band, Jr. 

Harvard — Robert Gray Allen, Theodore Lyman Crockett, Malcolm Lincoln 
Donaldson, Harry Gaylord Dorman, Jr., James Henry Durgin, Howard Finney, 
Jr., Bernard Jasper Goldberg (1923), Joseph Goodman, Jr., Donald Broughton 
Grover, Bartlett Harding Hayes, Jr., Frank Paul Kane, Edwin Bailey Lough 
(1923), James Martin, Stanley deJongh Osborne, Leicester Haydon Sherrill. 
Donald Spencer, Everett Howard Stahl, William Alexander Strickland (1923), 
Charles Lee Todd, Jr. 

Lafayette College — Robert Marsh Boarts, Jr., Donald Vastine Booz. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology — George Warren Bates, Paul 
Sherman Bauer, Stanley Cheney, Leland Wilson Cummings, John Eugene 
Deignan, Duryea Elwell Elmendorf, Frank Ching Fan Lin (1923), William 
Plummer Lowell, Jr., Lathrop Bennett Merrick, Noel Henry Miller, James 
Southworth Moon, Lawrence Scribner Philbrick, Elliot Sterling Pratt (1923), 
Sayre Broadhead Rose, Smith Davison Turner, Jr., Augusto Villalon (1923), 
William McAlpine Walworth, William Charles Wilder (1923), Frank Albert Wil- 
kinson, Nelson Frank Wilmot. 

University of Michigan — James Brayton Deane, Adolph Bernard 
Loveman. 

Princeton — George Baker Atwood, Frederic Mercer Avery (ex- 1923), 
Eugene Edward Blazier, Jr., Waller Beall Booth, Jr. (1923), Lansdon Hebbard 
Bowen, Harry Schiller Brandman, John Handy Edwards, William Melville 
Hart Greene (1921), Thomas Hale, 3d, William Langhorne Hobson, Jr., John 
Huttig, Karl Abraham Kopetzky (1923), Whitney Connor Lewis, John Martin 
McDonough (ex- 1922), Edward Clarence Mack, Eugene Manuel Matalene 
Henry William Matalene, Jr., Robert Nelson Moore (1923) , Alexander 
Sayles, Thomas Smitham, Ralph Cuyler Stevens, Jr., George Chadbourne 
Taylor, Jr., James Walker (ex- 1923). 

69 



University of Oklahoma — David Byrd Morgan (1924). 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute — Willis Hillings Heilman. 
Trinity — Richard Strong Fox well. 
Tufts — Theodore DeLuca. 
Wesleyan — Wilmot Brereton Lee. 

Williams — Howard Carter Babbitt, Roger Wing Brace, Walker Evans, 
3d, Harold Ahrens Holbrook, Preston Paris Kellogg, Joseph Simpson Little 
(1923), Grant Carpenter Manson, Elwyn Greeley Preston, Jr., Paul Revere 
Reynolds, Jr., Donald Fassette Ross, Royal Josiah Wright, Jr. 

University of Wisconsin — Ralph Manning Crowley, Edward Hammett, 
3d (ex- 1923), James Harrington Kellogg (1923). 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute — Lawrence Bradford Cheney. 

Yale — Daniel Allen, Roger Walker Batchelder, Beresford Ellsworth Beck, 
Louis Pierre Brosseau, George Watson Burr, Nicholas Guyot Cameron, Pietro 
Jerry Capra (1923), Horatio Campbell Chapman (1923), Ray Butler Clark, 
Robert Ober Clark, Charles Asa Clough, Jr., Horace Wellington Cole, Roswell 
Strong Coles, Edmund Petrie Cottle, Jr., Kennedy Creevey, Henry Stetson 
Crosby, Shelby Hammond Curlee, Jr., Benjamin Crawford Cutler, Howard 
McKeen Cutler, George Henry Danforth, 3d, Walton Porter Doggett, Richard 
Derby Elwell, Tracy Fabian (ex- 1922), Burnham Morris Fisk, John Thomas 
Frenyear (1923), Stanley Gill (ex-1923), Franklin Irvine Greene (1921), Robert 
Read Hannum, Albert Spear Harris, Harry Sherman Holcomb, Henry Forbush 
Howe, Edward Ingalls, Lawrence Kirtland Jennings, Frank Danby Lackey, Jr., 
Loren Hart Loomis, Edward Gay Mason, Theodore Thomas May (1923), 
Harold Alan Paget, Henry Godfrey Phillipps, Jr., Archie Monroe Quarrier, 
Joseph Verner Reed, George Overton Riggs, William Alton Riley, William 
Charles Riley, Bruce Douglas Rindlaub, Paul Brainerd Sargent, Henry Mann 
Silver, John Wendell Smith, Charles Latimer Stillman, Robert Maxwell Stock- 
der, Sydney Frederick Thomas, Raymond Everett Tracy, Charles Terry 
Tread way, Jr. (1923), Gordon Butler Wadhams, Donald Kimball Walker, 
Frederic William Wallace, John Cairns Watson (1923), Frank Erbin Wattles 
Jr., James Mattocks White, Louie Gustave Wienecke Harry Nye, 
Wieting, Charles Hastings Willard, Cornelius Van Ness Wood, Sidney Hopkins 
Wylie. 



70 



STUDENTS 



CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT 



CLASS I— SENIORS 



NAME 

Aguinaldo, Emilio, Jr. 
Allis, Jairus Searle Hurlbut 
Anderson, Robert Palmer 
Bigelow, Victor Stoddard 
Bliss, Charles Lydston 
Bruce, James Gould 
Bucknam, Charles Clark 
Buttrick, Allan Winfield 
Castleman, Godwin Munn 
Chalker, Richard Bushnell 
Cleaveland, Fred Maurice, Jr. 
Cooke, Hedley Vicars, Jr. 
Crane, Edward Payson 
Crosby, Willard Barnhart 
Daley, Leo Francis 
Dana, Richard 
Dunkle, Robert Johnston, Jr. 
Ellison, William Partridge 
El well, Paul Kenneth 
Epler, Palmer York 
Fitchen, John Frederick, 3d 
Foote, Alfred Sherman 
Ford, William Raymond Coffin 
Gordon, Alexander Dorward 
Harris, Hervie Eugene 
Heath, Ellis Kendrick 
Johnson, John Crittenden 
Jones, William Barksdale, Jr. 
Karnheim, Charles Frederick 
Lawson, George Robert 
Liebman, Walter Henry, Jr. 
Lloyd, Charles Disbrow 



HOME RESIDENCE 

Manila, P. I. 
Springfield 
Noank, Conn. 
Andover 
Newburyport 
Syracuse; N. Y. 
Wellesley Hills 
Andover 
Forest Hills, L. I., N. 
Old Saybrook, Conn. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Orange, N.J. 
Richmond 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Andover 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Brookline 

Newton 

Gloucester 

Methuen 

Albany, N. Y. 

Washington, D. C. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Hazardville, Conn. 

Elmhurst, L. /., N. Y 

Worcester 

Hamburg, N. Y. 

Vaughan, Miss. 

Medford 

Lawrence 

New York, N. Y. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



PRESENT ADDRESS 

Bartlet 12 
Clement 6 
Bartlet 30 
7 Locke St . 
Draper 3 
Day 1 
Phillips 18 
15 Wolcott Ave. 



Day 31 
Taylor 3 
Bartlet 25 
Taylor 12 
Adams 17 
Mrs. Jackson's 
14 Bartlet St. 
Bartlet 19 
Bartlet 7 
Day 35 
Bartlet 17 
Bancroft 7 
Bishop 31 
Bartlet 7 
Bishop 19 
Bishop 21 
Bishop 25 
Phillips 13 
Phillips 10 
Abbot 7 
Bishop 26 
Lawrence 
Bishop 17 
Bishop 13 



71 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Lord, John Anderson, Jr. 


Danvers 


Bishop 14 


Lord, Richard Noel 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


McNeer, Gordon Palmer 


Seward, Alaska 


Taylor 17 


Mears, Robert Moultrop 


Mansfield 


Miss Cheever's 


Merrick, Miner William 


Homer, N. Y. 


Andover 2 


Merrill, Frederick Thayer 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Phillips 8 


Monroe, John Hill 


Brookline 


Mrs. Gardner's 


Moody, Howard Hartwell. 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Day 33 


Moulton, William Watkins 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Bartlet 8 


Multer, Smith Lewis, Jr. 


East Orange, N. J. 


Bartlet 24 


Murphy, Charles Barney Gould 


Durham, N. H. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Newman, Frank Watson 


Tunkhannock, Pa. 


Bartlet 3 


Newman, Fred Otis 


Tunkhannock, Pa. 


Bartlet 3 


Parkinson, Clinton Frederick 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Pierce, Ross Edwards 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Taylor 26 


Posey, Marshall Lyne 


South Orange, N. J. 


Andover 4 


Remington, Harry George 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Bartlet 29 


Renouf, Henry Charles 


And over 


140 Elm St. 


Rudman, Sidney Stanley 


Roxbury 


Miss Cheever's 


Scott, Stuart Nash 


Madison, Wise. 


Phillips 4 


Simonds, Philip Baldwin, Jr. 


Providence, R. I. 


Bishop 14 


Smith, Macauley Letch worth 


Ijouisvilh, Ky. 


Bartlet 26 


Smith, Russell Train 


Concord 


Phillips 12 


Stern, Jesse Myron 


Chestnut Hill 


Bartlet 23 


Trevvett, Walter Egan 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Bartlet 16 


Turner, Benner Creswill 


Columbus, Ga. 


Abbot 9 


van Peski Frederik Herman 


Rotterdam, Holland 


Phillips 14 


Wasserman, Milton 


Scarsdale, N. Y. 


Day 27 


Watson, Louis Henry 


New York, N. Y. 


Bartlet 29 


Wayland-bmith, Robert 


Kenwood, N. Y. 


Johnson 12 


West, Harold Albert William 


New York, N. Y. 


Eaton 2 


Wright, John Goddard 


Boston 


Mr. Johnson's 



Seniors — 64 



CLASS II— UPPER MIDDLERS 



Asher, Frank Lewis 
Bailey, Arthur Chaplin 
Barbour, William Tefft, Jr. 
Basham, Harvey Alonzo, Jr. 
Beecher, George Buckingham 
Blunt, William Williams, Jr. 
Brayton, Lawton Slade 



Boston 

Wilmington, Del. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Shawnee, Okla. 
Hillsboro, Ohio 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Fall River 



Phillips 7 
Bancroft 2 
Johnson 17 
Phillips 13 
Day 8 
Abbot 16 
Bancroft 15 



72 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Brown, Gardner 


Hinsdale, III. 


Day 14 


Chace, Richard Arnzen 


Tiverton, R. I. 


Adams 24 


Connor, Samuel Powers, Jr. 


Maplewood, N. J. 


Hardy 2 


Curtis, Paul 


Wellesley Hills 


Phillips 11 


Cushing, William Harvey 


Brookline 


Phillips 11 


Danforth, Nicholas Williamson 


Summit, N. J. 


Bishop 21 


Dickson, John Paul 


Nantucket 


Pease 11 


du Pont, Edmond 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Johnson 12 


Eddy, George Alfred 


Newtonville 


Bishop 35 


Eldridge, Harold Norton, Jr. 


Northport, L. I., A r . )' 


Bart let 4 


Eldridge, Huntington 


Chicago, III. 


Johnson 4 


Foster, Edward Harris 


Andover 


Lupine Road 


Hamilton, Robert Chandler 


Chicago, 111. 


Day 29 


Haskell, Nelson Cary, Jr. 


A mherst 


Phillips 3 


Hay, Malcolm 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Bartlet 1 


Hicks, Leslie Robert, Jr. 


Melrose Highlands 


Day 8 


Hitchcock, Henry 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Bartlet 8 


Holbrook, Gerald Clark 


Red Bank, N.J. 


Miss Cheevers' 


Holt, Reginald Woodbury 


Andover 


74 Bartlet St. 


How, James 


St Louis, Mo. 


Clement 13 


Howe, Mark DeWolfe 


Boston 


Day 10 


Jackson, Edmund Balch 


Cambridge 


Pemberton 1 


Layton, Robert Reese, Jr. 


Bridgeville, Del. 


Bartlet 2 


Leach, Anthony Osborne 


Danvers 


Farrar 6 


Learned, Ebenezer, Jr. 


Norwich, Conn. 


America 8 


Lord, William Walcott 


Danvers 


Johnson 20 


McCandless, John Ashley 


New York, N. Y. 


Andover 9 


McKinlay, Robert Emmons 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Eaton 


Miller, Randolph Vanlderstine 


Homer, N. Y. 


Bancroft 16 


Newcomb, Henry Martyn 


Arlington, N. Y. 


Bishop 5 


Ottaway, John Palmer 


St. Clair, Mich. 


Day 2 


Paskus, Richard Martin 


White Plains, N Y. 


Johnson 27 


Peabody, Alfred Horatio Belo 


Cambridge 


Bancroft 3 


Pope, John Macauley 


Woodclif Lake, N. J. 


Adams 5 


Redpath, Robert Upjohn, Jr. 


Maplewood, N.J. 


Bishop 18 


Renouf, Edward Pechmann 


A ndover 


140 Elm St. 


Rice, Edward Archibald 


Woburn 


Bartlet 17 


Richards, Francis Bullard, 2d 


Wetmore, Colo. 


Andover 2 


Richardson, Arthur Welland 


( 'harles River 


Mrs. McCurdy s 


Roberts, Joseph Baxter 


Nyack, N. Y . 


Day 6 


Rogers, John 


Kennebunk, Me. 


Bartlet 10 


Rogers, Richard 


W est Newton 


Mr. Kelley's 


Shoop, Wilbur Roy 


Northport, L. I., N. Y 


. Mrs. Jackson's 


Smith, Joseph Harold 


Andover 254 South Main St. 


Stebbins, Edwin Allen, Jr. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Andover 6 



73 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Stone, Knowlton Davies 


Andover 


1 Locke St 


Whiting, Richard George 


Winter Hill 


Bishop 35 


Willis, Raymond Smith, Jr. 


Glen Ridge, N.J. 


Phillips 15 


Woodward, William Harwood 


Roanoke, Va. 


Eaton 1 


Upper Middlers — 56 




CLASS III- 


-LOWER MIDDLERS 




A 11 /"M A T Tl T 

Allen, Claude LeRoy, Jr. 


Melrose 


Clement 5 


Askren, Robert Leslie 


New Concord, Ohio 


Mr.Stott's 


Barnes, Clarence Alfred, Jr. 


Mansfield 


Bishop 12 


Bauer, Byrne Weiller 


New York, N. Y. 


Pemberton 5 


Beal, Bruce Hilton 


Brookline 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Bernheim, Richard 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 27 


Biery, Francis Joseph 


Andover 


45 Salem St. 


T"»l V 1 /"i 1 i g~\ pa 

Blanchard, Gerald Geoffrey 


New York, N. Y. 


Eaton 6 


Borah, Charles Edward 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


Bishop 33 


Bracken, Thomas Brett 


Evanston, III. 


Mrs. Sullivan's 


Bryant, Robert Bancroft 


Gardner 


Bishop 2 


Chnstenson, Charles Edwin 


Burlingame, Calif. 


Park 2 


Dobbins, Stanwood Fuller 


Bradford 


Mr. Stott's 


Downes, Robert Brooks 


Bradford 


Taylor 10 


Farnham, John Paulding 


New York, N. Y. Miss Hinchcliffe's 


J^erry, Chamberlain Spear 


Clinton, N. Y. 


Churchill 5 


Harrison, James Lewis 


Painesville, Ohio 


Day 13 


XT 1 ttt»ii • mi 

Healey, William Thomas 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Miss Cheever's 


Hibbard, Stephen Brace 


Pittsfield 


Adams 14 


Huesmann, Louis MacDonald 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Bancroft 4 


Jepson, Chauncey LeBaron 


M elrose 


Miss Cheever's 


Keedy, Allen 


North Andover 


Bishop 3 


Linn, Francis Smith 


South Zanesville, Ohio 


Pease 12 


Lobb, John Simonds 


Munising, Mich. 


Miss Foster's 


Mulqueen, Carr 


New York, N . Y. 


Eaton 4 


Newcomb, Wyllys Stetson 


Arlington, N ' . Y \ 


Hardy 3 


Nichols, Monroe Kimball 


Andover 


25 Central St. 


Palmer, John Peabody 


Seattle, Wash. 


Adams 22 


Poore, Charles Morton 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Proudfoot, David Martin 


Cambridge 


Mrs. McCurdy's 


Rolfe, Maurice Wyman 


Swampscott 


Hardy 1 


Rossi, Henry 


Lawrence 


Bishop 15 


Rylee, Robert Tilmon 


Memphis, Tenn. 


Pemberton 5 


Stafford, Richard Rockwell 


Stamford, Conn. 


Johnson 19 


Stewart, Charles Arthur, Jr. 


Cherry field, Me. 


America 3 



74 



NAME 

Taylor, Donald Walker 
Watson, George Landon 
Weeks, Edward Walsh 
Winters, Rand Eddy 
Woolsey, Convers Keith 



HOME RESIDENCE 

Worcester 
Kokomo, Ind. 
Andover 
Bay City, Mich. 
Aiken, S. C. 
Lower Middlers — 40 



PRESENT ADDRESS 

Clement 7 
Taylor 9 
19 Wolcott Ave. 
Johnson 19 
Johnson 10 



CLASS IV— JUNIORS 



Alcaide, Harold 

Allie, Harold Joseph 

Anderson, Edward Ralph 

Annis, Jere Wright 

Archbald, Wodrow 

Bain, William Joseph, Jr. 

Biddle, W T illiam Eugene, Jr. 

Blaikie, Cameron, Jr. 

Bliss, Frederick Warren 

Brockway, Robert Kingsley 

Brown, George Franklin Corns tock 

Brown, Sumner Eugene 

Bull, Frederick Guion 

Caine, Robert John 

Capra, Carl 

Carlin, Alfred William 

Carpenter, Francis Forfar 

Chadwick, Daniel 

Chadwick, Henry Tesamond 

Coonley, Frederick, Jr. 

Dane, John Lawrence 

Davis, Francis Edward 

de la Vergne, Chester Rhoades, Jr. 

Diman, Ezra Sampson 

Dow, George Lincoln, Jr. 

Drake, James Benjamin 

Dudley, Chester Wesley, Jr. 

Kadie, Douglas Durrant 

Elliot, Robert Lamoureaux 

Ellis, Ezekiel John 

Emrich, Duncan Black MacDonald 

Farmer, Elmer Capen 

Francis, Daniel Marion 

French, Richard Soule 



Brookline 

Andover 

Methuen 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Pottsville, Pa. 
Lawrence 
Amesbury 
Englewood, N. J. 
Newburyport 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Keene, N. H. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Germantown, Pa. 
Englewood, N. J. 



Williams Hal 
Taylor 24 
Tucker 1 
Williams Hall 
Farrar 4 
Lawrence 
Pease 10 
Churchill 4 
Williams Hall 
Bartlet 18 
Williams Hall 
Abbot 7 
Tucker 3 
Adams 6 
Bishop 15 



Johannesburg, So. Africa Clement 3 
New Rochelle, N. Y. Williams Hall 
Old Lyme, Conn. Pemberton 6 

Lawrence Lawrence 
West New Brighton, S. I., N. Y. 

Williams Hall 
Marblehead Mrs. Hill's 

Andover 1 Temple Place 

Banff, Alberta, Canada Williams Hall 
Taunton Phillips 20 

Cambridge Williams Hall 

Bath, Me. Williams Hall 

Boston Pease 9 

Tilton, N. 11. Mr. Tower s 

Medford Day 15 

Covington, La. Williams Hall 

Framingham Williams Hall 

Wilmington, Del. Woods 8 

Phoenix, Ariz. Mr. Stott's 

Andover 276 So. Main St. 



75 



NAME 

Fuller, James Constant 
Gill, Charles Farrington 
Goodwin, Robert Auel 
Graves, Hubert Newton 
Gregg, James Bartlett 
Harrington, Howard DeWitt 
Hazard, Robert Culver 
Heaiy, Robert William 
Holt, Hiland John Dale 
Hopkins, Douglas Turnbull 
Hopkins, Stephen Davis 
Houghton, Augustus Seymour, 
Huntress, Howard Bancroft 
Huppertz, Stephen Vail 
Johnson, Edward Alfred 
Jones, Owen Craven 
Judge, John Newton 
Kaufman, John Loughlin 
Keesling, Francis Valentine, Jr. 
Kimball, Chester Frayer 
Kimberly, James Holbrook 
King, Wyatt Alexander 
Kissinger, Warren Nicholas 
Layton, Caleb Rodney, 3d 
LeBoutillier, George Tyrroll 
Luria, Herbert Lipman 
McCarthy, Daniel Joseph 
McClellan, John Alden 
McHugh, Thomas Augustine 
McKinlay, William Emmons 
McKinney, Frank Leo 
Malcolmson, Charles Towsley 
Marshall, Warner, Jr. 
Marshuetz, Adolph G 
Merriam, George Franklin 
Miller, Charles Averill, Jr. 
Mitchell, David Wendell 
Moore, Jack Kinney 
Norris, Forris Wood, Jr. 
Norris, Harry Franklin, Jr. 
O'Kane, W'illiam Henry 
Page, Jack Boardman 
Palmer, Frederic, 3d 
Parisien, Arthur Emile 
Park, John Gray 



HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 



White Pimm, N. 
Hartland, Vl. 
Hewlett, L. I., N, 
I. 



Providence, R. 
Hampton, Va. 
Andover 

Salamanca, N . Y. 
Chicago III. 
Andover 

New York, N . Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Jr. New York, N. Y. 
Andover 
Concord 
Detroit, Mich. 
Pleasantville, N . Y . 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Sistersville, W. Va. 
Neenah, Wise. 
Hudson, Ohio 
Reading, Pa. 
Georgetown, Del. 
Andover 
Reading, Pa. 
Andover 
Andover 
Lawrence 
Yonkers, N . Y. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Chicago, III. 
Brookline 

Larchmont, N . Y. Mr. 
Mount Kisco, N . Y . 
Murtinsburg, W. Va. 
A ndover 
Wichita, Kans. 
Cambridge 
Staunton, Va. 
Durham, N. H. 
Phoenix, Ariz. 
Haverford, Pa. 
Haverhill 
Groton 



Eaton .> 
Adams 22 
Williams Hall 
Williams Hall 
Williams Hall 
18 Chapel Ave. 

Williams Hall 
Mrs. Sullivan's 
100 Main St. 
Woods 
W r oods > 
Woods 7 
00 Chestnut St. 
Adams 10 
Day 15 
Adams 3 
Day 19 
Day 
Woods 
Adams 17 
Johnson 21 
Taylor 1 
Farrar 1 
Tucker 1 
Williams Hall 
Williams Hall 
20 High St . 
1 Orchard St . 
Lawrence 
Pease 12 
Williams Hall 
Taylor 24 
Williams Hall 
L. C. Newton's 
Adams 22 
Williams Hall 
123 Elm St. 
Williams Hall 
Williams Hall 
Mr. Manning's 
Adams 10 
Hardy 4 
Williams Hall 
Bishop 34 
Williams Hall 



70 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Phillips, Hollis Hall 


Andover 


25 Highland Road 


Pigeon, Abram Standish 


East Boston 


Williams Hall 


Plum, Stephen Haines, Jr. 


Newark, N.J. 


Adams 19 


Poland, Warren Morrison 


Wakefield 


Churchill 6 


Poore, George Capron 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Potter, Eastman 


Birmingham, Mich. 


Miss Carter's 


Putnam, Sebastian Visher Talcott 


New York, N. Y. 


Cannon House 


Quimby, Allen, Jr. 


Portland, Me. 


Williams Hall 


Read, Carlton Arthur 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Reily, George Wolf, 3d 


Harrishura, Pa. 


Taylor 13 


Reiner, Henry Christian 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Williams Hall 


Robertson, Treadwell Ayres, Jr. 


Monterrey, Mexico 


Williams Hall 


Robinson, Frederick Augustus 


Maiden 


Williams Hall 


Rogers, Francis Clark 


M ethuen 


Williams Hall 


Roland, Richard Hood 


Nahant 


Williams Hall 


Schwartz, Harold 


Plainfield, N . J. 


Williams Hall 


Shepard, David Prindle 


Winnipeg, Manitoba, 


Can. 






Williams Hall 


Sibley, Ernest Evans 


Palisade, N.J. 


Williams Hall 


Smith, Charles Howard 


Chamber sburg, Pa. 


Taylor 20 


Smith, Richard Clarke 


Rutland, Vt. 


Williams Hall 


Smith, Sherwood Winslow 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Churchill 3 


Snow, Carol 


Kennebunkport, Me. 


Williams Hall 


Spaeth, Paul Earnest 


Princeton, N.J. 


Eaton 2 


Sprigg. John McMahon 


Dayton, Ohio 


Williams Hall 


Stein, Gustav Adolph, Jr. 


Copenhagen, Denmark America 9 


Stewart, Donald William 


Chicago, III. 


Eaton 3 


Sun, Thomas Kwang Jwe 


Tientsin, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


Swain, Howard Townsend, Jr. 


Boston 


Williams Hall 


Tate, Walter Seymour Ballou 


Andover 


135 Main St. 


Taylor, Varnum 


Wakefield 


Williams Hall 


Taylor, William Davis 


Boston 


Williams Hall 


Thurber, Francis Beattie, 3d 


New York, N. Y. 


Adams 15 


Treadway, Graham Richards 


' Bristol. Conn. 


Johnson 28 


Tseng, Yueh Sien 


Tientsin, China 


Mrs. Roberts's 


Tufts, Cleon Howard 


Manchester, N. H. 


Mr. Tower's 


Tuttle, Egbert Clayton, 2d 


Rutland, Vt. 


Mr. Stott's 


Tweed, Henry Howe 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


Johnson 15 


Tyler, Warren Perley 


Wakefield 


Johnson 5 


Van Wicklen, Frederick Miller, Jr. 


Englewood, N. J. 


Tucker 3 


Veeder, George Albert 


Winnetka, III. 


Park 3 


Verigan, Francis 


Fort Casey, Wash. 


Clement 12 


Wilmot, Noyes Salvador 


Union City, Conn. 


Mr. Stott's 


Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi 


Kobe, Japan 


Abbot 18 



Juniors — 122 



77 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT 



CLASS A — SENIORS 



HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 



Alcaide, Otto Antonio 

Babson, George Jay 

Birch, William Dunham 

Boardman, William Edward Bradford 

Bradeen, Frederick Barton, Jr. 

Bradley, George 

Brown, Wentworth 

Carpenter, John Hart 

Chappell, William Blackstone 

Clark, Robert Browning, Jr. 

Colby, Ira Gordon, Jr. 

Conwell, Charles Brewster 

Cory, John Aumock 

Craig, Gibson Ernest 

Darling, George Bapst, Jr. 

Dickinson, Henry Randel 

Dodge, Ernest Homer 

Dove, Percival, Jr. 

Dyer, Henry Salmon 

Ely, Cheever Hamilton 

Ely, John Wilson 

Emery, Natt Morrill, Jr. 

Engstrum, Frederick 

Evans, Ralph Merrill 

Fletcher, George Alfred, 2d 

Flint, Thomas 

Foote, William Jenkins 

Francis, Howland Coit 

Franks, Harry Edward 

Garfield, Owen Richardson 

Gay, William Campbell 

Goodwill, Francis Ormes 

Gordon, Lewis Henderson 

Graves, Eugene Brainard 

Gray, Edward LeBreton 

Greene, Roger Denise 

Haight, Eric Hall 

Hamilton, Wilson 

Harris, Byron Douglas 



Brook line 
Leesburg, Va. 
Dover, N.J. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Essex, Conn. 
Lawrence 
Berlin, N.H. 
Salem, Ohio 
New London, Conn. 
Haverhill 
Claremont, N.H. 
Somerville 
Brielle, N. J. 
Springfield 
Allston 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Lowell 

Andover 



Phillips 1 
Bartlet 8 
Bartlet 12 
Day 4 
Bancroft 9 
Bishop 27 
Day 11 
Phillips 22 
America 8 
Bishop 34 
Johnson 11 
Hardy 5 
Draper 6 
Clement 8 
America 5 
Abbot 14 
Mr. Tower's 
17 Salem St. 



Brookline Miss Hinchcliffe's 

Sharon Bishop 22 

Newark, N.J. Bishop 16 

Bethlehem, Pa. Miss Hinchcliffe's 

Los Angeles, Calif. Draper 5 

Haverhill Haverhill 

Haverford, Pa. Bancroft 3 

Boston Taylor 11 

New Haven, Conn . Day 34 

Brookline Bishop 6 

Lawrence Lawrence 

Middleboro Bancroft 7 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Bartlet 30 

Jamestown, N . Y. Bartlet 14 

Flushing, N. Y. Bartlet 28 

Providence, R. I. Mrs. Roberts's 

Rochester, N. Y. Draper 3 

Denver, Colo. Phillips 2 

Boston Draper 6 

Caledonia, N. Y. Bishop 20 
Johannesburg, So. Africa Bancroft 9 



78 



NAME 


HOME RESIDEN'CE 


PRESL..NT AUU±vc«5 


Harris, Herbert Donald 


Johannesburg, So. Af 


rica Bartlet 13 


Heald, ^ llliam Edward 


}fethven 


Phillips 12 


Hereford, Robert Ogden 


New York. N . Y. 


Johnson 18 


Hitchcock, Edson Beckwith 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 10 


TT J T"> * 1 1 TT* ■ 

Hodges, Richard Burt 


Ben Avon, Pa. 


Abbot 4 


TT 11* T 1 TT 1 t 

Hollis, John Hudson, Jr. 


Lynn 


Miss Carter's 


TT 1 TO 1 l y~i 1 • 

Humphrey, Edward Cornelius 


Louisville. Ky. 


Bartlet 26 


TT ■ 1 • TT**11* A 11 

Hutchinson, VS llliam Arnold 


Pepperell 


Bancroft 12 


James, Charles Durand 


Milwaukee. T7*?>r. 


Taylor 16 


Jennings, Edward Morton. Jr. 


Winthrop 


( annon House 


Jones. Herbert Norman 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Bartlet 19 


Kern, Alfred Dean 


Portland, Me. 


Draper '2 


Kern, James Simon 


Middletoicn, Pa. 


Phillips 10 


Long, Charles Francis 


Framingham 


Bishop 1 1 


T 1 4 11 1f~ If i* 

Look, Allen MacMartin 


West Tisbury 


Bancroft 12 


Lyon, Charles Durant 


Meriden, Conn. 


Taylor 1 1 


Mcv_ arthy, Eugene r leming 


Bufalo, N. Y. 


Mr. Johnson's 


McClellan, John 


Woodstock, Conn. 


Taylor 19 


McComb, Malcolm htuart 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 5 


McCord, Donald Nelson 


Middletown, Pa. 


Day 9 


MacKinnon, Joseph Aver 


Shanghai, China 


Andover 9 


Marshall, John Curtis 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Mrs. Roberts'- 


Mercer, Aymer Turnbull 


Andover 


64 Salem St. 


"\ T '11 TD 1 Tin i 

Merrill, Earl Whittemore 


Summit, IV. J. 


Day 10 


Mills, Hiram Francis 


Waits-Held, Vt. 


Pemberton 2 


Munger, John Dudley 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Abbot 14 


Newberry, Fredric Stark 


Montclair, N.J. 


Johnson 18 


Phillips, Montague Burrell 


Peterborough, N . H. 


Bancroft 17 


Quarrier, Sidney Sayre 


Short Hills, N. J. 


Bartlet 9 


T**l_ * T* 1 n • 1 1 

Rhmes, Paul Fairbanks 


Watertoicn, N . Y . 


Bancroft 18 


Richardson, Paul Harvey 


Middleton 


Bishop 22 


Rickard, James Theodore 


Andover 


Taylor 28 


Robison, Sanford Harding 


Kansas City. Mo. 


Adams 11 


Rosenthal, David Anson 


New York. N . Y. 


Mrs. Sullivan's 


Ross, Donald Stirling 


Ardmore, Pa. 


Johnson 17 


Rowe, Sargent Stephen 


Walt ham 


Johnson 16 


Saunders, Henry Warren, Jr. 


Westbrook. Me. 


Abbot 17 


Scaife, James Verner, Jr. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Mr. Trott's 


Seward, Paul Sanford 


Guilford, Conn. 


Bancroft 16 


Sheh, Quincey Queen Shan 


Tientsin, China 


Dr. Stearns's 


C TL * fTM T /T* 1 1 

Shipman, Thomas Lemngwell 


Andover 


Bartlet 27 


Smith, Dudley Tenney 


Montclair. X . J. 


Bancroft 15 


Speer, John Howard 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Johnson 1 1 


Spiel, Robert Edward 


Chicago, III. 


Mr>. Sullivan's 


Stevens, John Werner 


Mount Vernon. X . Y. 


Tucker 4 



7M 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 


Thompson, Beverly Tucker, Jr. 


Oak Park, III. 


Park 4 


Treat, Robert Belden, Jr. 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Abbot 4 


Van Alstyne, William Beekman, Jr. Kinderhook, N. Y. 


Bishop 3 


Van Duyn, John, 2d 


Syracuse, N . Y. 


Taylor 18 


Vogt, Joseph Sexton 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Miss Cheever's 


Vose, Edward Rich 


East Eddington, Me. 


Abbot 15 


Warner, Douglas Calvin 


White Plains, N. Y. 


Johnson 19 


Weaver, Gordon Read 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Bancroft 10 


Weil, Emanuel Max 


New York, N. Y. 


America 7 


Westcott, John McMahon, 2d 


Springfield, Ohio 


Day 23 


Wetzel, Carroll Robbins 


Trenton, N . J. 


Phillips 9 


White, Russell, Jr. 


Cambridge 


Adams 7 


Wyer, Richard Farrar 


Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. Abbot 16 


Wylie, Donald Penniman 


LynnHeld Centre 


Churchill 7 




Seniors — 98 






-UPPER MIDDLERS 




Alger, Russell Alexander, Jr. 


Detroit, Mich. 


Day 35 


Allen, Richard Bedford 


Andover 


147 Main St. 


Askew, Henry Ess 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Adams 17 


Baker-Carr, John D'arcy 


Nairobi, British East Africa Adams 9 


Barber, Courtenay, Jr. 


Chicago, III. 


America 1 


Barnes, Melvin Bunker 


Andover Twin Cedar Farm 


Beardsley, Walter Raper 


Elkhart, Ind. 


Day 4 


Bixler, Paul Edwin 


Lencoes, Bahia, Brazil 


Day 28 


Blanchard, Albert Cook 


Bangor, Me. 


Abbot 15 


Bliss, Thorndike Bruce 


Danvers 


Adams 9 


Block, Philip Dee, Jr. 


Chicago, III. 


Johnson 23 


Blunt Charles Nash 


Port Huron, Mich. 


Bishop 4 


Booth, Albert Washington 


Methuen 


Day 22 


Rnnth Themis Curtis 


New Britain, Conn. 


Johnson 4 


Borg, Cecil 


New York,N. Y. 


Day 12 


Bradley, George Goodnow 


Hartford, Conn. 


Taylor 4 


Bradley. Walter Peters 


Houston, Texas 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Bremer, Theodore Glover, Jr. 


Brookline 


Bishop 4 


Brown, Gordon Kenneth 


Keene, N. H. 


Abbot 6 


Burton, Malcolm King 


Forest Hills, L. I., N. 


Y. Clement 9 


Bush, William Brainard 


New York, N. Y. 


Phillips 6 


Buss, Eugene Rowell, Jr. 


Wyoming, Ohio 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Campopiano, Fred 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


Card, Joseph Phelps 


Highland Park, III. 


Bartlet 11 


Carey, Frank Dawson 


Lawrence 


Clement 3 


Carter, George Robert, Jr. 


Honolulu, H. T. 


Johnson 24 



80 



NAME 

Cary, John Reeder 

Chopitea, Jose I 

Chute, Edward Ensley 

Cookman, Robert Rollen, Jr. 

Cornish, Charles Hubbard 

Cragin, Malcolm Allen 

Cragin, Stuart Wilson 

Cross, Kent Converse 

Dean, Henry Bower 

Dickerman. William Carter, Jr. 

Dolman, John Elbert, Jr. 

Dunsford, Bevan 

Dunsford, Harold 

Earle, Victor Montague, Jr. 

Edson, Edward Gilroy, Jr. 

Edwards, William Seymour 

Failing, John Noyes 

Flynn, Grant Yetman 

Foster, Willard R. S. 

Gartley, Alonzo 

Gettys, Charles Briggs 

Grant, Maxwell Berry 

Gray. George, 2d 

Ham. Clifford Dudley, Jr. 

Hammond, Seymour Chamberlain 

Harriman, Lawrence Manning 

Harvey, Stanley Benedict 

Henry, Stuart Compton 

Hinsdale, Charles Linsley 

Hobbs, Stillman Moulton 

Hogue, Oliver Driscoll, Jr. 

Holt, John Eliot 

Howe, Thorndike Dudley, Jr. 

Howell, Charles Morgan, Jr. 

Hutcheson, Joseph Chappell, 3d 

James, William Gilbert 

Johnstone, Vanderburgh 

Jones, Harry Allen 

Keator, William Chauncey, Jr. 

Keep, Champness Terry Sedgwick 

Knight, Richard Custer 

Kohler, Carl James 

Larsen, George Harriman 

Lauchheimer, Alan 

LeRoy, Newbold, Jr. 



HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Day 21 


Lima, Peru 


Bartlet 4 


Lowell 


Pemberton 3 


Fiichburg 


Bartlet 18 


Mapleioood, N.J. 


Day 33 


Worcester 


Taylor 15 


Worcester 


Taylor 6 


Winchendon 


Phillips 19 


Harrisonburg, Va. 


Clement 4 


New York, N. Y. 


Bishop 2 


St. Joseph. Mo. 


Phillips 22 


Chelmsford 


Abbot 5 


Chelmsford 


Abbot 6 


Yonkers, N . Y. 


Bancroft 18 


Beaumont, Texas 


Bartlet 25 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Day 26 


East Orange, N. J. 


Phillips 17 


Havana, Cuba 


Adams 8 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Mrs. Farlow's 


Honolulu, H. T. 


Adams 10 


Louisville, Ky. 


Bartlet 16 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Mr. Johnson's 


Gardiner, Me. 


Taylor 18 


Managua, Nicaragua 


Adams 4 


Spokane, Wash. 


Taylor 14 


North Wilmington 


Abbot 5 


Traverse City, Mich. 


Taylor 17 


And over 


29 Central St. 


Meriden, Conn. 


Taylor 9 


Hampton, N. H. 


Bancroft 2 


Brookline 


Bishop 24 


New York, N. Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


Boston 


America 10 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Day 16 


Houston, Texas 


Johnson 25 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Miss Cheever's 


Pasadena, Calif. 


Bartlet 20 


Pleas-aniville, N. Y. 


Williams Hall 


Wayne, Pa. 


Day 2 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 23 


Melrose 


America 10 


Kohler, Wise. 


Bartlet 15 


Brookline 


Bancroft 5 


Far Rockaway, L. I., N. Y. Taylor 8 


New Rochelle, N. Y. 


Miss Carter's 



81 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


HOME ADDRESS 


Lockett, John 


Winnetka, III. 


Pemberton 1 


Lovett, George Rowell 


Berlin, N. H. 


Day 24 


Mansfield, George Mortimer 


Canton 


Day 32 


Mead. James Jennings, Jr. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Johnson 24 


Miller, Richard Dunbar 


Racine, Wise. 


Bartlet 1 


Miller, William Whipple 


Winnetka, III. 


Abbot 4 


Morris, Richard Taylor 


Hamilton, N. Y. 


Taylor 3 


Mott, John Grenville 


Highland Park, 111. 


Bishop 33 


Munroe, Edward Mansfield 


Peabody 


Clement 10 


Newcombe, George Russell 


New York, N. Y. 


Cannon House 


O'Connell, Clinton Paul 


Hackensack, N. J. 


Bartlet 13 


Onthank, Curtis Heath 


Fitchburg 


Phillips 19 


Parker, Edward Linne 


Newport, R. I. 


Draper 5 


Patrick, Gerard Vermilye 


Elyria, Ohio 


Taylor 4 


Peck, Irving Hobart, Jr. 


Derby, Conn. 


Mrs. Hill's 


Peelle, Stanton Canfield, Jr. 


Chevy Chase, Md. 


Pease 9 


Perkins, Thomas Lee 


Upper Montclair, N. J 


Miss Cheever's 


Peters, John Lovett 


East Holliston 


Day 22 


Petze, Edwardes Sinclair 


Newburgh, N. Y. 


Phillips 1 


Potter, Daniel Peirce 


North Adams 


Phillips 9 


Reed, Morris Houghton, Jr. 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bishop 23 


Reinhart, Alan David 


Brookline 


Day 19 


Remick, Jerome Hosmer, Jr. 


Detroit, Mich. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Riggs, Theodore Scott 


Washington, D. C. 


Taylor 21 


Robertson, John Ferguson 


North Tarrytown, N. Y. 


Mr. Johnson's 


Roome, William Journeay, 3d 


PlainHeld, N. J. 


Mr. Tower's 


Rosenbaum, Emanuel Frank, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


Day 36 


Samper, Ernesto 


Bogotd, Colombia, S. A. 


Adams 8 


Sanborn, George Knight 


Andover 


5 Locke St. 


Sanford, Charles Hamilton, J»\ 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Day 29 


Sawyer, Charles Henry 


Andover 


Bishop 8 


Schulte, Arthur David 


New York, N. Y. 


Taylor 7 


Schulten, Alexis John, Jr. 


Louisville, Ky. 


Eaton 1 


Sheldon, Joel Craik 


Louisville, Ky. 


Bishop 27 


Shepard, Francis Guernsey 


South Orange, N. J. 


Pemberton 3 


Sinclair, Walter Baldwin 


Omaha, Nebr. 


Johnson 1 


Skinner, Morris Phillips 


Madison, N. J. 


Bishop 16 


Slagle, Roy Edward 


Lima, Ohio 


Abbot 13 


Smith, Keith, Jr. 


Linwood, Utah 


Bishop 8 


Smith, Samuel Bailey, 2d 


Laconia, N. H. 


Day 17 


Spear, Arthur Prince, Jr. 


Brookline 


Phillips 21 


Spence, Arthur Tallmadge 


Milwaukee, Wise. 


Taylor 16 


Stephens, William 


Plymouth 


Andover 1 


Stevenson, Malcolm Wilder 


Winnetka, III. 


Adams 10 



NAME 


HOME RESIDENCE 


PRESENT ADDRESS 


Thorn, Charles Norman, Jr. 


WestHeld, N. J. 


Bancroft 11 


Toner, Williams McCulloch 


Anderson, Ind. 


Bartlet 20 


Tsai, Kuo Fong 


Tientsin, China 


Abbot 7 


Tutein, Ernest Arthur, Jr. 


Winchester, 


Clement 2 


Tutein, Richard Allen 


Winchester 


Clement 1 


Tweedy, Laurance, Jr. 


South Orange, N. J. 


Mrs. Jackson's 


Vanderschmidt, George Frederick, Jr. 


Leavenworth, Kans. 


Day 2 


Viles, William Payson 


Augusta, Me. 


Johnson 26 


Wadhams, William Henderson, Jr. 


New York,N. Y. 


Bishop 4 


Waite, John Day 


Crown Point, N. Y. 


Clement 11 


Walker, Roland 


Oberlin, Ohio 


Adams 3 


Walker, Stoughton 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


Bartlet 2 


Ward, Thomas, 2d 


Washington, D. C. 


Andover 6 


Watson, Charles, 3d 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Draper 1 


Watson, George Clarke 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Farrar 6 


Wells, Edward Payson, 2d 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Adams 21 


Wells, Louis Badger 


Bryn Mawr, Pa. 


Draper 1 


WTiite, Alden Darling 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Phillips 20 


Wingate, Frank Poucher 


Arlington, N . J. 


Bishop 23 


Wood, Robert Julian 


Decatur, III. 


Andover 1 


Woods. George Edward, Jr. 


Astoria, L. I., N. Y. 


Day 20 


Worth, John Sharpless, 2d 


St. Davids, Pa. 


Mrs. Sullivan's 


Wright, John Patterson 


Keene, N. H. 


Day 32 



Upper Middlers — 138 



CLASS C— LOWER MIDDLERS 



HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 



Alexander, Walter 
Ames, Edward Winslow, Jr. 
Anthony, Warren Wilcox 
Austin, Richard Coffin 
Babcock, Theodore King 
Barber, Robert Stanton 
Beeson, John Kennedy 
Billhardt, Karl Fred 
Bixler, Henry Elwell 
Bodwell, Henry Arnold 
Bowen, George Henry 
Brockelman, Bernard Brinkhaus 
Bryant, John Walden 
Buckley, Charles William 
Burton, Myron Simmons 



Aurora, III. 
Annapolis, Md. 
Portsmouth, R. I. 
Nantucket 
Cambridge 
Westerly, R. I. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Brockton 

Lencoes, Bahia, Brazil 
Andover 
Newton 
Fitchburg 
West Newton 
Swampscott 

Forest Hills, L. N. Y. 



Bancroft 4 
Farrar 5 
Miss Foster's 
Taylor 5 
Miss Carter's 
Cannon House 
Johnson 13 
Day 3 
Day 28 
31 Morton St. 
Taylor 10 
Mrs. Hill's 
Phillips 8 
Johnson 3 
Abbot 8 



83 



NAME 

Bush, Kimberly 
Bushnell, Lowell Francis 
Case, John McDougall 
Chan, Hin-Cheung 
Cheney, Gilbert Cunningham 
Clarke, Lawrence Litchfield 
Colby, Charles Howard 
Coleman, Joseph Francis Lansing 
Colling, Arthur Frederick, Jr. 
Collins, Frederic William 
Colquhoun, Gordon Lee 
Coxe, Brinton 
Curtis, John Morton 
Curtis, William Elroy 
Dale, Alan Arthur 
Davison, Thurlow Weed 
Dorn, Sidney Lillie 
Dorr, Dudley Hunt, Jr. 
Drummond, John Landells 
English, Benjamin Farren, Jr. 
Evans, Weller Burns 
Fishel, Carlton Mark 
Fisher, Agnew 
Fisher, John Milligan 
Flanders, Kenneth 
Flowers, Norman Farrand 
Flynn, John Doyle 
Foster, Frank Pray 
Fox, Douglas Claughton 
Foxall, Douglas Hanley 
Glendinning, Geoffrey 
Glock, Ralph Charles 
Goodman, Charles Edmund, Jr. 
Hanley, Francis Joseph, Jr. 
Harris, James Dexter 
Hawkes, Albert Whitfield 
Heilman, W T illiam Milton 
Howarth, Francis George 
Hyde, Samuel, 2d 
Keany, Matthew 
Kelly, Byron Case 
Kemp, Louis Franklin 
Layman, Daniel Wonderlich, Jr. 
Lee, Burton James, Jr. 
Lindsay, David, 3d 



HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRE98 



New York, N. Y. 
Danville, III. 
Darien, Conn. 
Hongkong, China 
Southbridge 
Southbridge 
Melrose 

Hewlett, L. I.,N. Y. 
Plain field, N. J. 
Whitman Mr. 
Andover 

Philadelphia, Pa. Mr. 
Wellesley Hills 
South Orange, N. J. 
BakersHeld, Calif. 
New York, N. Y. 
Johnstown, N . Y. 
Lancaster 
Bronxville, N.Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
East Orange, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Greenwich, Conn. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Winchester 
Jackson, Mich. 
Fall River 
Montclair, N. J. 
Plandome, L. I., N. Y 
Rochester, N . Y. 
Lawrence 
Meriden, Conn. 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Whitman 
Maiden 

Montclair, N . J. 
Kittanning, Pa. 
Oxford 
Fall River 
Andover 
Sodus, N. Y. 
Elmhurst, N. Y. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wilmington, Del. 



Mrs. 



Phillips 6 
Taylor 25 
Bishop 32 
Sullivan's 
Bartlet 9 
Taylor 10 
Johnson 8 
America 2 
Cannon House 
L. C. Newton's 
38 Chestnut St. 
L. C. Newton's 
Phillips 11 
Adams 20 
Mrs. Roberts's 
Day 23 
Abbot 4 
Johnson 6 
Adams 2 
Pemberton 6 
Bartlet 24 
Williams Hall 
Johnson 7 
Johnson 5 
Adams 1 
Johnson 9 
Day 25 
Mr. Kelley's 
Adams 12 
Bancroft 6 
Lawrence 
Adams 15 
Pease 10 
Taylor 23 
Adams 18 
Mr. Kelley's 
Day 25 
Phillips 21 
Mr. Stott's 
32 Morton St. 
Mr. Tower's 
Farrar 5 
Cannon House 
Adams 2 
Tucker 5 



84 



HOME ADDRESS PRESENT RESIDENCE 



Linson, Paul Jordan 
Look, Frank Byron 
Loveland, Charles Noyes, Jr. 
McClellan, Hugh Derby 
Mapes, Charles Francis 
Marshall, William Paul 
Massey, Albert Goodale 
Moore, Arthur LaCroix 
Mumby, George Ernest 
Newbold, Haywood 
Osborne, Leslie Becker 
Owl, Frell McDonald 
Paine, Ralph Delahaye, Jr. 
Paxton, Worthen 
Pierce, John Henry 
Poor, William George 
Powley, Harry Crane, Jr. 
Pratt, Nichols Ripley 
Prior, John Andrew 
Randall, Roy Earl 

Ransom, Henry Edward MacDonald 

Rich, Harold Perrine 
Ridgway, William Combs, Jr. 
Rollins, Richard Russell 
Rugee, Louis Nickel 
Sanders, Wallace Mcllvain 
Sawyer, Henry Severance 
Scott, William Clement, Jr. 
Shelden, Charles Freeman 
Shikata, Shinzo 

Southgate, Hugh MacLellan, Jr. 
Spivack, Sydney Dreyfus 
Stein, Alva 

Stevenson, George Smith 
Stout, Stuart 

Street, Gustavus Calder, 3d 
Sun, Charles Kwang Hwa 
Sykes, Henry Wilfred, Jr. 
Thomas, William Barzillai 
Thompson, Edwin Turner 
Thorn, Gordon Phillips 
Thrall, Robert Campau 
Traver, Wallace Deitz 
Uliman, James Ramsey 



Kingston, N. Y. 
West Tisbury 
Wilkes Barrc. Pa. 
Andorer 

Newburgh, N. Y. 
Rye,N. Y. 
Waiertown, N. Y. 
Portsmouth, Ohio 
Palmyra, N. Y. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Mr. Tower's 
Pease 14 
Adams 4 
1 Orchard St. 
Johnson 3 
Pease 11 
Adams 21 
Bishop 1 
Bancroft 17 
Bancroft 5 



Guatemala City, Guatemala Andover 5 

Cherokee, N. C. Pemberton 2 

Durham, N. H. Bishop 28 

Washington, Pa. Bancroft 6 

Chicago, III. America 6 

West Swanzey, N. H. Tucker 2 

Port Jefferson, N. Y. Cannon House 

Hingham America 4 

Medford Phillips 17 

Brockton Day 3 
Gould 

Toronto, Ontario, Canada Adams 23 

Buffalo, N . Y. Taylor 25 

Englewood, N . J. Eaton 5 

Des Moines, la. Day 14 

South Bend, I nd. Phillips 2 

Denver, Colo. Taylor 17 

D alt on Johnson 10 

Newburgh, N. Y. Churchill 5 

New York, N. Y. Day 16 

Osaka, Japan Mr. Manning's 

Chevy Chase, Md. Park 1 

Brookline Mrs. Gardner's 

Newton Johnson 2 

Winnetka, III. Adams 10 

Fort Scott, Kans. Day 27 

Houston, Texas Johnson 25 

Tientsin, China Dr. Stearns's 

Belmar, N . J. Mr. L. C. Newton's 
Johannesburg, So. Africa Mrs. Hill's 

Fall River Johnson 26 

Westfield, N. J. Bancroft 11 

Detroit, Mich. Johnson 22 

New York, N. Y. Draper 2 

New York, N. Y. Taylor 22 



85 



NAME 

Varian, John Frederick 
Watters, Kenneth Wallace, Jr. 
Whitham, John Garnett, Jr. 
Wickwire, Theodore Harry, 3d 
Wilder, Stanley Kendall 
Wolcott, James Lister 
Yuan, Henry Ke An 
Yuan, William Ke Chiu 



HOME RESIDENCE PRESENT ADDRESS 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Lawrence 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Dover, Del. 
Tientsin, China 
Tientsin, China 
Lower Middlers — 112 



Johnson 14 
Day 21 
Andover 3 
Bishop 36 
Day 18 
Adams 13 
Taylor 2 
Taylor 2 



8G 



CLASSIFICATION 



Classical Department — 

Class I — Seniors 64 
Class II — Upper Middlers 56 
Class III — Lower Middlers 40 

160 

Class IV — Juniors 122 

Scientific Department — 

Class A — Seniors 98 
Class B — Upper Middlers 1 38 

Class C — Lower Middlers 112 

348 

630 



REPRESENTATION 



U 1 d.^dCll UoCL to 


199 




2 


llCn XvllXL 


116 


fYlrl q Vi nm n 

\J riS d 11 LI 111 <X 


Wow Jprsev 


43 


Wpst Virginia 


2 


P*»rmavl vt» nifl 
l ciiiis^v i v ctinu 


33 


"MVvrtVi Carolina 




Connecticut 


28 


South Carolina 


1 


Illinois 


22 


Iowa 


1 


Michigan 


17 


Louisiana 


I 


New Hampshire 


16 


Mississippi 


J 




14 


XNeDrdsKd. 




Missouri 


13 


Tennessee 




Maine 


11 


Utah 




Indiana 


7 


Alaska 




Rhode Island 


7 


Hawaiian Territory 


2 


Delaware 


6 


Philippine Islands 


1 


Wisconsin 


6 


China 


9 


California 


5 


South Africa 


4 


Kentucky 


5 


Canada 


3 
2 


Virginia 


5 


Brazil 


Arizona 


4 


Japan 


2 


Colorado 


4 


British East Africa 




Texas 


4 


Colombia, S. A. 




Vermont 


4 


1 Cuba 




District of Columbia 


3 


Guatemala 




Georgia 


3 


Holland 




Kansas 


3 


Mexico 




Maryland 


3 


Nicaragua 




Washington 


3 


Peru 




Minnesota 


2 








87 


Total 


630 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Fred T. Murphy, 1893 

Frank S. Livingood, 1872 
Addison S. Thayer, 1877 
Tracy H. Harris, 1882 
James M. Crosby, 1887 
Richard Armstrong, 1892 
Edwin H. Clark, 1897 
William W. Thayer, 1902 

George T. Eaton, 1873 

Frederick E. Newton, 1893 

George F. French, 1897 



President 
Vice-Pbesidents 



Statistical Secretary 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Detroit, Mich. 

Reading, Pa. 
Portland, Me. 
New York, N. Y. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Hampton, Va. 
Winnetka, 111. 
Concord, N. H- 

Andover 

Andover 

Andover 



Meetings, with a reception and dinner, are held at Andover each year in 
connection with the graduation exercises. The date for 1923 will be June 15. 
It is desired that correspondence regarding membership and information 
concerning past members of the Academy be sent to the Statistical Secretary. 



BOSTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Philip Loring Reed, 1902 
vice-presidents 

Desmond FitzGerald, 1863 
George L. Huntress, 1866 
Nathaniel Stevens, 1876 
Dr. Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 
Arthur J. Selfridge, 1881 

secretary-treasurer 
William B. Higgins. 1914 



Hobart Ames, 1883 
Selden W. Tyler, 1891 
Stephen E. Young, 1894 
Samuel A. F. Ely, 1911 
Van Zandt Stone, 1912 



88 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Arthur C. Jelly, 1878 William F. Merrill, 1895 

Fred B. Lund, 1884 Arthur Drinkwater, 1896 

Elias B. Bishop, 1889 Philip W. Thomson, 1898 

Raymond M. Crosby, 1893 Joseph S. Seabury, 1900 

Brewer Eddy, 1894 Howard M. Bartlett, 1902 

Frederick B. Greenhalge, 1894 Robert T. Fisher, 1906 



CHICAGO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

I. Newton Perry, 1905 Henry A. Gardner, Jr., 1901 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Raymond F. Snell, 1914; 6 North Michigan Avenue 

DIRECTORS 

Robert Stevenson, Jr., 1896 Alexander L. Jackson, 1910 

Frank S. Porter, 1896 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

S. Lewis Smith, 1885 Charles A. Otis. 1888 



DETROIT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

William T. Barbour, 1896 Lawrence K. Butler, 1897 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Kenneth L. Moore, 1910; 169 Van Dyke Ave. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Burns Henry, 1896 C. Hayward Murphy, 1902 

Steuart L. Pittman, 1908 Kenneth L. Moore, 1910 



NEW JERSEY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT SECRETARY 

Forrest F. Dryden, 1889 Albert Frey, 1881; 331 South Orange Ave. 

Newark 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Decker, 1910 Allan M. Hirsh. 1898 

Kinsley Twining, 1897 



NEW YORK ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Francis R. Appleton, 1871 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Tracy H. Harris, 1882 Oliver G. Jennings. 1883 

SECRETARY 

Frank H. Simmons, 1894; 110 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. 

TREASURER 

Frank Dale Warren, 1879; 225 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Henry J. Fisher, 1892 James L. Mills, 1897 

G. Ernest Merriam, 1892 Fred S. Bale, 1902 

F. Maurice Newton, 1895 Douglas H. Cooke, 1903 
Herbert H. Ramsay, 1905 



NORTHWESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Fred E. Weyerhaeuser, 1892 John Crosby, 1880 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Edwin White, 1902; 98 East 4th Street, St. Paul, Minn. 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT VICB-PRESIDENT 

Joseph W. Lucas, 1885 Henry N. Merritt. 1908 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Horace O. Wells, 1892; Pine Street, west of Broad, Peirce School 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Walter L. Murphy, 1868 Laurence T. Bliss, 1891 

George L. Herrick, 1869 Harry B. Hickman, 1894 

Seneca Egbert, 1880 William H. McCarthy, 1907 

Herman V. Ames, 1884 Langdon W. Clark, 1914 

Dr. Wm. S. Wadaworth, 1887 Sydney Thayer, Jr., 1915 



90 



PITTSBURGH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT 

Southard Hay, 1898 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

M. B. Suydam, 1896 

SECRETARY 

James J. Brainard, 1899; 1863 Shady Ave. 

TREASURER 

Chauncey O'Neill, 1900 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. W. Burdick, 1898, Chairman 
G. B. Preston, 1877 
E. H. Brainard, 1888 
C. E. Beeson, 1890 



Clinton L. Childs, 1898 
Turner D. Moorehead, 1906 
J. B. Blair, 1916 
T. M. Jones, 3d, 1917 



ST. LOUIS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Wilbur B. Jones, 1905 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

Sidney R. Overall, 1903; Federal Reserve Bank Building 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

James E. Allison. 1885 A. Linn Bostwick, 1904 

Walter C. Taylor, 1885 Samuel N. Holliday, 1904 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Major Marlborough Churchill, 1896 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Charles Sheldon, 1887 W. D Wilcox, 1889 

Ord Preston, 1894 

TREASURER 

Duer McLanahan, 1917 
91 



SECRETARY 

Robert C. Dove, 1907; Shoreham Hotel 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Hon. Richard Wayne Parker, 1864 John A. Mcllhenny, 1888 

Irving H. Dunlap, 1881 Robert S. Hume, 1894 

Henry S. Graves, 1888 Murray A. Cobb, 1899 

A. Britton Browne, 1906 



OMAHA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Charles E. Metz, 1911 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Ralph Peters, 1911 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

John H. Caldwell, 1908; U. S. Trust Co. 



9i 



INDEX 



Subject Page 

Absences 24 

Academy 

Constitution 11-16 

History 11-16 

Location 16 

Administration Offices 33 

Admission Requirements 18-21 

Algebra 57 

Alumni Association 88 

Athletic fee 26 

Athletic grounds 35 

Bible 56 

Board 28 

Dining Hall 

Private Houses 

Boston Alumni Association 88 

Breakage Deposit 25 

Chapel 33 

Chemistry 59 

Chicago Alumni Association 89 

Classification 87 

Class Officers 23 

Cleveland Alumni Association 89 

Course of Study 48-50 

Cum Laude 68 

Curriculum 48-50 

Detroit Alumni Association 89 

Dining Hall 28 

Diploma Requirements 23 

Dormitories 31-32 

Faculty Houses 30 

Rents 27-28 



93 



Subject Page 

Scholarship Rooms .... 36 

Williams Hall (for young boys) .... 29 

Drawing ... 58 

English ' ... 55 

English Bible 56 

Entrance Examinations 22 

Entrance Examination Requirements 18-20 

Excuses, Out-of-Town 24 

Expenses 25-27 

Faculty 6-8 

Fees, Athletic and Infirmary 26 

Founders of Phillips Academy 4 

French 52 

Furniture in Rooms 27 

Geography 59 

Geometry 57 

Graduation Fee 26 

Greek 51 

Gymnasium 33 

History of Phillips Academy 11-16 

Honor Students (1921-1922) 65-68 

Infirmary 34 

In6rmary Rates 26 

Latin 51 

List of Students 1922-23 71-86 

Mechanical Drawing 58 

Music 61 

New Jersey Alumni Association 89 

New York Alumni Association 90 

Northwestern Alumni Association 90 



94 



Subject Paob 

Peabody House 33 

Philadelphia Alumni Association ... 90 

Phillips Academy 11-16 

Its Origin 

Constitution 

Phillips Inn 34 

Philosophy 60 

Physical Training 60 

Physics 59 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association 91 

Preachers 10 

Principals 4 

Prizes 42-47 

Prizes Awarded 1922 62-64 

Public Speaking 56 

Recitation Buildings 32 

Religious Exercises 24 

Representation 87 

Scholarship Aid 36 

Self-Help 36 
Special Room-Scholarships 28 

Scholarship Funds 36-42 

Scholarship Honors 65 

Scholarship Rooms 36 

Senior Honors 66 

Spanish 54 

St. Louis Alumni Association 91 

Students, List 1922-23 71-86 

Swimming Pool 33 

Testimonials 18 

Trigonometry 58 

Trustees 5 

Washington Alumni Association 91 

Williams Hall 

Dormitory for Young Boys 29 



95 



CALENDAR 



1924 



January 7 
March 28 

A pr il 7 
June 12 

June 13 
June 16-21 



Monday, 8. 'f5 -p.m. Second term begins 

Friday noon Second term ends 

Easter Recess — 10 Days 



Monday, 8.1^5 -p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



June 17 and 18 Tuesday and Wednesday 



June 



Saturday 



Third term begins 

Recitations close for the two 

lower classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board Exam- 
inations. 

School entrance examinations in 
Andover, New York City, and 
Chicago 

Third term ends for the two 
upper classes 



September 16 Tuesday, 9.00 a.m. Chapel, followed by entrance 

examinations 

September 17 Wednesday, 7.ko a.m. Fall term begins for the two 

lower classes 

September 18 Thursday, 7.1f5 a.m. Fall term begins for the two 

upper classes 

December 18 Thursday noon First term ends 

Christmas Vacation — 18 Days 



1925 



January 5 
March 26 

April 6 
June 11 

June 12 
June 15-2C 



Monday, 845 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Easter Recess 
Monday, 8.^5 p.m. 
Thursday noon 

Friday 



June 16 and 17 Tuesday and Wednesday 



June 20 



Saturday 



Second term begins 
Second term ends 
11 Days 

Third term begins 

Recitations close for the two 

lower classes 
Commencement 

College Entrance Board exam- 
inations 

School entrance examinations in 
Andover, New York City, and 
Chicago 

Third term ends for the two upper 



FOUNDERS 



Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS Hon. JOHN PHILLIPS, LL.D. 

Hon. SAMUEL PHILLIPS, Jr. 



Constitution and Deeds of Trust signed 
Board of Trustees organized 
School opened for instruction 
Act of Incorporation passed 
Theological Seminary opened 
Scientific Department opened 
Archaeological Department opened 
Theological Seminary incorporated 
Theological Seminary real estate purchased 



April 21, 1778 
April 28, 1778 
April 30, 1778 
October 4, 1780 
Septmber 28, 1808 
September 27, 1830 
May 1, 1901 
April 16, 1907 
July 1, 1908 



PRINCIPALS 



ELIPHALET PEARSON, LL.D. 
EBENEZER PEMBERTON, LL.D. 
MARK NEWMAN, A.M. 
JOHN ADAMS, LL.D. 
OSGOOD JOHNSON, A.M. 
SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, LL.D. 
FREDERIC W. TILTON, A.M. 
CECIL F. P. BANCROFT, Ph.D., LL.D. 
ALFRED E.STEARNS, Lttt.D., L.H.D. 



1778 — 1786 
1786 — 1793 
1795 — 1809 
1810— 1833 
1833 — 1837 
1838 — 1871 
1871 — 1873 
1873 — 1901 
1903 — 



4 



TRUSTEES 



PRESIDENT 

ALFRED LAWRENCE RIPLEY, A.M. 
Elected 1902 

CLERK 

ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D 
Elected 1903 

TREASURER 

JAMES COWAN SAWYER, A.B. 
Elected 1900 



JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D. 
Elected 1899 

CLARENCE MORGAN, A.B. 
Elected 1900 

CLIFFORD HERSCHEL MOORE, Litt.D. 
Elected 1902 

HENRY LEWIS STIMSON, A.M. 
Elected 1905 

ELIAS BULLARD BISHOP, A.B. 
Elected 1907 

JOHN ADAMS AIKEN, LL.D. 
Elected 1908 

FRED TOWSLEY MURPHY, M.D. 
Elected 1908 

GEORGE BO WEN CASE, A.B. 
Elected 1920 

THOMAS COCHRAN, A.B. 
Elected 1923 

JAMES BROWN NEALE, A.B. 
Elected 1923 



Andover 

AXDOVER 

Andover 

Cambridge 
Shelbitrne, Vt' 
Cambridge 
New York, N. Y. 
Newton Centre 
Greenfield 
Detroit, Mich. 
Englewood, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Mi n ersvi lle, Pa. 



5 



FACULTY 



ALFRED ERNEST STEARNS, A.M., Litt.D., L.H.D., Principal 

On the Peter Smith Byers Memorial Foundation 6 Chapel Avenue 

Instructor 1897-1903. Elected Principal 1903 

GEORGE THOMAS EATON, A.M. 73 Bartlet Street 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1880 

CHARLES EMERSON STONE, Pn.B. 158 Main Street 

Instructor in French Appointed 1890 

CHARLES HENRY FORBES, A.M. 25 Hidden Road 

Professor of Latin on the John C. Phillips Foundation Elected 1891 

ARCHIBALD FREEMAN, A.M. Phillips 16 

Instructor in History Appointed 1892 

ALLEN ROGERS BENNER, A.B. Andover 7 

Professor of Greek Elected 1892 

JAMES CHANDLER GRAHAM, S.B. Phillips 5 

Peabody Instructor in Natural Sciences Appointed 1892 

JOHN LEWIS PHILLIPS, A.B. Williams Hall 

Instructor in Latin Appointed 1 894 

FREDERICK EDWIN NEWTON, Ph.B. 9 Salem Street 

Instructor in Mathematics Appointed 1895 

WARREN KING MOOREHEAD, A.M. Hidden Field 

Director of the Department of American Archeaology and 

Curator of the Museum Elected 1901 

LESTER EDWARD LYNDE, A.B. 195 Main Street 

Instructor in Mathematics and Principal's Assistant Appointed 1901 

HORACE MARTIN POYNTER, A.B. 21 Phillips Street 

Instructor in Latin Appointed 1902 

PEIRSON STERLING PAGE, M.D. 193 Main Street 

Physical Director and Medical Adviser Appointed 1902 

GEORGE WALKER HINMAN, A.M. 169 Main Street 

Instructor in Latin Appointed 1906 

CECIL KITTREDGE BANCROFT, A.B. Bartlet 5 
Instructor in Latin, Principal's Assistant, and Registrar Appointed 1906 

CHARLES ARTHUR PARMELEE, A.M. Bartlet 22 

Instructor in French Appointed 1906 

ARTHUR WILLIS LEONARD, A.B. 79 Bartlet Street 

Instructor in English Appointed 1907 

GEORGE FRANKLIN FRENCH, A.M. 12 School Street 

Instructor in French Appointed 1907 



6 



CLAUDE MOORE FUESS, Ph.D. 


183 Main Street 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1908 


FREDERICK MAY BOYCE, A.M. 


154 Main Street 


Instructor in Physics 


Appointed 1909 


GUY HEBARD EATON, A.B. 


Johnson Hall 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1909 


OSWALD TOWER, A.B. 


32 Phillips Street 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1910 


FRANK O'BRIEN, A.B. 


Adams Hall 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1910 


CARL FRIEDRICH PFATTEICHER, Th.D. 


173 Main Street 


Instructor in Music, Bible, and Philosophy 


Appointed 1912 


FREDERIC WILLIAM HEATON STOTT, A.B. 


77 Bartlet Street 


Instructor in English and Public Speaking 


Appointed 1912 


EDWIN TENNEY BREWSTER, A.M. 


8 Judson Road 


Instructor in Geography 


Appointed 1916 


HOWARD WADSWORTH CHURCH, Ph.D. 


Bishop 10 


Instructor in German 


Appointed 1917 


ROY EVERETT SPENCER, A.B. 


Pemberton 4 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1917 


LESTER CHARLES NEWTON, A.M. 


17 Salem Street 


Instructor in French and German 


Appointed 1918 


LAWRENCE V ROTH, A.M. 


Taylor Hall 


Instructor in History 


Appointed 1918 


FRANK MAY BENTON, A.B. 


Johnson Hall 


Instructor in Latin 


Appointed 1918 


HAROLD CRAWFORD STEARNS, A.B. 


Bishop 29 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1918 


HENRY PRESTON KELLEY, A.B. 


Day 30 


Instructor in Spanish and French 


Appointed 1918 


WINFIELD MICHAEL SIDES, S.B. 


Eaton 7 


Instructor in Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing 


Appointed 1919 


HERBERT FREEMAN FRASER, A.M. 


18 Salem Street 


Instructor in Mathematics and History 


Appointed 1919 


ROSCOE EDWIN DAKE, S.B. 


Williams Hall 


Instructor in Mathematics and Chemistry 


Appointed 1921 


JAMES WILLARD WILLIAMS, A.M. 


Taylor Hall 


Instructor in Biology and Latin 


Appointed 1922 


M. LAWRENCE SHIELDS, A.B. 


Day 7 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1923 


JOHN EDWARD FOSTER, A.B. 


Bancroft 13 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 1923 



7 



HENRY HOWARD LDDi, S.B. 


Williams Hall 


Assistant in Physics 


Appointed 19x3 


JOHN SEDGWICK BARSS, A.M. 


54 Salem Street 


Instructor in Mathematics 


Appointed 1923 


A. ELLIS FREEMAN, S.B. 


Cheever House 


Instructor in English 


Appointed 19x4 


O A T) A TT T r\\XT XT'TD ACT 

SARAH LOW *ROSl 


210 Main Street 


Librarian 


Appointed 19 lz 


ALFRED VINCENT KIDDER, Ph.D. 


215 Main Street 


Director of the Southwestern Expedition of the Archaeological 


Department 


Appointed 1915 


FREDERICK JOSEPH DALY, A.B. 


Bancroft 1 


Private Secretary to the Principal 


Appointed 1916 


RAY ARTHUR SHEPARD, S.B. 


Draper 4 


Assistant to the Physical Director 


Appointed 1919 


OTHER OFFICERS 




VIRGIL D. HARRINGTON, A.B. 


18 Chapel Avenue 


Purchasing Agent and Manager of the Service Department 


HENRY S. HOPPER 


25 Phillips Street 


Bursar 




JOHN H. BUTTIMER, S.B. 


Bishop 7 


Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 




MABEL L. JONES 


221 South Main Street 


Secretary to the Principal 




ALICE T. WHITNEY 


61 Bartlet Street 


Recorder 




MONTVILLE E. PECK 


Adams Hall 


Assistant to the Physical Director 




ETHEL A. HITCHCOCK 


Phillips Street 


Assistant in the Purchasing Agents Office 




MELVINA M. McKEEVER 


Isham Infirmary 


Head Nurse at Isham Infirmary 




MRS. C. M. BAILEY 


Williams Hall 


Matron at Williams Hall 




EUNICE C. LOVEJOY 


21 Lovejoy Road 


Assistant in the Treasurer s Office 




E. ROSAMOND GREENWOOD, A.B. 


Lawrence 


Secretary to the Principal 





s 



EVELYN JENKINS, A.B. 

Assistant Secretary to the Principal 
EDITH L. WADE, A.B. 

Assistant in the Library 
MARION E. HILL 

Assistant in the Treasurer s Office 

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGY 
GLADYS M. SALTA 

Secretary to the Director of the Department of Archaeology 
IDA Z. SANFORD 

Secretary to the Director of Southwestern Expedition 



Ballardvale Road 
Porter Road 
Lupine Road 



ACADEMY PREACHERS, 1923-1924 



President CLARENCE A. BARBOUR, D.D. 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Rev. ROBBINS W. BARSTOW 


Concord, N. H. 


Dean JAMES A. BEEBE, D.D. 


Boston 


President BERNARD I. BELL, D.D. Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y. 


Rev NEHEMIAH BOYNTON D D 


Mow York Citv 


Dpan CHARLES R BROWN D D 


Mpw TTavpti Conn 


Rev. ALBERT COE 


Somerville 


Rev JOHN T DALLAS 


Hanover, N. H. 


Rev. D. BREWER EDDY 


Boston 


President W. H. P. FAUNCE, D.D., LL.D. 


Providence, R. I. 


Rev. ARTHUR HOWE 


Watertown, Conn. 


Rt. Rev. EDWIN H. HUGHES, D.D. 


Maiden 


Rev. EDWIN A. McALPIN 


Madison, N. J. 


Prof. SAMUEL McCOMB, D.D. 


Cambridge 


President PAUL D. MOODY, D.D. 


Middlebury, Vt. 


Rev PALFREY PERKINS 


Boston 


Rev. MALCOLM E. PEABODY 


Lawrence 


Prop WTTJTAM LYON PHELPS PhD Litt D 

x xvUr • T t xxjX^x.t\.1tx Xj x wii x xx ijxjx uj x. n . xj . . xjx i i . i-^ • 


New Haven, Conn . 


Mr DWID R PORTER 

lUlli XJ aTx t XJ_/ XV. X UltlXvJll 


New York City 


Prov T HAYFS PROCTOR Ph D 

x ii,\JT . x ■ xxrv X XjO X XVV/V^ X vllj X Jl, XJ • 


Williamstown 


Proti T DTTNCAN SP4FTH PhD Litt D 

X ItUr ■ O • XJ \J V_yxi.i.> ul xxJJ X XXj X xx • XJ . , XJi X X . u • 


Princeton, N. J. 


Rirv HAROTDF B SPEIGHT 


Boston 


r>iTAxr W T TTJ ARD L SPFRRY DD 

XJ H/Ars tt XXjXj.TXsXVX-/ Xj. OX XjXVXV x j xj *xj • 


Cambridge 


Principal ALFRED E. STEARNS, Litt.D., L.H.D. 


Andover 


Rev. J. ROSS STEVENSON, D.D., LL.D. 


Princeton, N. J. 


Rev. JAY T. STOCKING, D.D. 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Rev. JOHN TIMOTHY STONE, D.D., LL.D. 


Chicago, 111. 


President J. LEIGHTON STUART 


Peking, China 


Rev . ARTHUR S. WHEELOCK 


Andover 


Rev. JOHN SHERIDAN ZELIE, D.D. 


Troy, N. Y. 


10 





PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



Phillips Academy is not a private school, but an endowed 
academy, controlled by a Board of Trustees and administered 
under the written constitution of its founders. By the terms 
of this Constitution, or Deed of Gift, signed April 21, 1778, 
Esquire Samuel Phillips (1715-1790) of North Andover and his 
brother, John Phillips (1719-1795) of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
set aside tracts of about 141 acres on Andover Hill and 200 acres 
in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, together with the sum of 1614 
pounds, as a foundation for a school. This document, outlining 
the broad principles upon which the proposed institution was to 
be conducted, was composed by Esquire Phillips's son, Samuel 
Phillips, Jr. (1752-1802), with the advice and aid of his friend, 
Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826). Samuel Phillips, Jr., was after- 
wards Judge of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, 
President of the Senate, and Lieutenant-Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Although Judge Phillips derived many of his educational 
theories from the writings of John Locke and from the English 
nonconformist schools with the scheme of which he was familiar, 
his plan was nevertheless highly original. The purpose of the 
academy was specifically stated in the following words: — 

"And, in order to prevent the smallest subversion of the true intent of this 
Foundation, it is again declared, that the first and principal object of this In- 
stitution is the promotion of true Piety and Virtue; the second, instruction in 
English, Latin, and Greek languages, together with Writing, Arithmetic, 
Music, and the Art of Speaking; the third, practical Geometry, Logic, and 
Geography; and the fourth, such other of the liberal Arts and Sciences, or 
Languages, as opportunity and ability may hereafter admit, and as the Trustees 
shall direct." 

The chief emphasis was laid on the development of character, 
and the Master was to take pains k 'to regulate the tempers, to 



n 



enlarge the minds, and form the Morals of the Youth com- 
mitted to his care". It was stipulated, also, that the school 
"shall be ever equally open to youth, of requisite qualifications, 
from every quarter". The government was placed in the hands 
of a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. In order to prevent 
sectarianism and provincialism, it was specified that a majority 
of the members should be laymen, and that more than half 
must not be residents of the town in which the academy is 
located. The Trustees were hampered by no vexatious or 
trivial restrictions, but were given sole authority over the institu- 
tion. By the provisions of the Act of Incorporation, passed by 
the General Court, October 4, 1780, their number was fixed at 
never more than thirteen or less than seven, and they were 
permitted to possess real estate with an income not exceeding 
five hundred pounds and personal property with an income not 
greater than two thousand pounds. These holding powers have 
since been considerably enlarged by legislative enactments, as 
the school has grown. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held on 
Tuesday, April 28, 1778. Of the twelve original members, four 
were members of the Phillips family: Esquire Samuel Phillips, 
John Phillips, William Phillips of Boston, and Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. These men became in turn the first four presidents of the 
Board. The other members, all relatives or close friends of the 
Phillips family, were John Lowell and Oliver Wendell of Boston, 
Rev. Josiah Stearns of Epping, Rev. Elias Smith of Middleton, 
Rev. William Symmes of North Andover, and Rev. Jonathan 
French, Nehemiah Abbot, Esq., and Eliphalet Pearson of 
Andover. 

Phillips School, as it was called until its incorporation, was 
opened for instruction April 30, 1778, in a remodeled carpenter's 
shop on Andover Hill, thirteen pupils being present; before the 
year was over, fifty-two had registered. The first principal was 
Eliphalet Pearson, a stimulating teacher and stern discipli- 
narian, who established high standards of instruction and super- 



12 



vision. Shortly before he resigned in 1786 to become a professor 
at Harvard, a new wooden building was erected to meet the 
demands of the rapidly expanding school. Pearson was suc- 
ceeded by Ebenezer Pemberton, a polite and scholarly master, 
who devoted much attention to the manners of his pupils. When 
he left in 1793, he was followed in office by Mark Newman, in 
whose administration the Andover Theological Seminary was 
founded, largely through the efforts of Dr. Pearson. This 
seminary, which was opened September 28, 1808, was placed 
under the jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees of Phillips 
Academy, and remained in Andover almost exactly a century. 

The fourth principal, John Adams, who replaced Newman in 
1810, raised the prestige of the school, increased the attendance, 
and enlarged the faculty. He published the first catalogue and 
made the first revision of the curriculum; but his primary interest 
was in the moral welfare of the boys. The second Academy 
building was burned on January 28, 1818, and a new brick, 
colonial edifice, designed by the famous architect Bulfinch, was 
erected within a year; this "classic hall", described in Oliver 
Wendell Holmes's poem, The School Boy, is now in use as the 
Dining Hall. In 1830 the Teachers' Seminary, a new institu- 
tion made possible by a bequest of His Honor, William Phillips 
(1750-1827) of Boston, was opened in a massive square structure, 
commonly known as the Stone Academy, built for that purpose. 
This Teachers' Seminary, combining the aims of a normal 
school and a scientific school, was the second of its kind in the 
United States. After twelve years of existence with only 
moderate success it was finally, in 1842, merged with Phillips 
Academy as the "English Department", a name which was 
changed in 1892 to a more nearly accurate title, "Scientific 
Department". 

In 1832 John Adams resigned at the age of sixty, and Osgood 
Johnson was elected principal. Unfortunately he died in 1837, 
of consumption, in his thirty-fifth year. During his adminis- 
tration the "Commons", dormitories known to so many gene- 

13 



rations of Phillips boys, were built under the direction of Samuel 
Farrar, Esq., Treasurer of the Trustees. 

Samuel H. Taylor, whose reign of thirty -four years was the 
longest in the school history, became principal in 1837. The 
word "reign" is used advisedly, for he was an autocrat, severe 
in his methods of government and prompt to punish offenders. 
" Uncle Sam", as he was familiarly called, was a relentless 
drill-master in the classics and gained a well-deserved reputation 
for thoroughness and accuracy. He was a strong and vigorous 
personality, who made an enduring impression on all who came 
under his influence. In 1864 the Stone Academy was destroyed 
by fire, and was replaced by the Main Building, which 
has since been twice reconstructed. In 1865 Mr. George 
Peabody gave $25,000 to found the Peabody Instructorship in 
Natural Sciences, first filled by the late William B. Graves. 
Dr. Taylor, on January 29, 1871, dropped dead in the vestibule 
of the Main Building. For the next two years the office of 
principal was held by Frederic W. Tilton, who, however, could do 
little in that short period. 

The modern era of development began in 1873 with the 
arrival of Cecil F. P. Bancroft, who was principal until his 
death in 1901. Dr. Bancroft, working in a quiet, tactful, but 
persistent way, brought about many needed reforms. He 
first made a complete revision of the curriculum, thus enabling 
the school to meet the entrance requirements of any college, 
classical or scientific, and greatly broadening the range of 
studies. In his effort to gather about himself a larger and 
more efficient body of teachers he was entirely successful. The 
attendance also increased: in 1873 there were 252 pupils; in 
1895 this had grown to 524, and after 1892 it never again 
dropped below 400. Dr. Bancroft also strove to secure additions 
to the plant, especially by providing dormitories in which boys 
could live under the direct supervision of instructors. He was 
aided in this aim by Melville C. Day of the class of 1858, who, 
in 1892, gave $8000 for a new dormitory, Taylor Cottage (now 

14 



Pemberton Cottage), which was the beginning of the present 
extensive system of houses for students. Mr. Day continued 
his gifts, providing in all six dormitories which to-day furnish 
rooms for 168 boys, besides the teachers in charge. At his 
death in 1913 Mr. Day made Phillips Academy his residuary 
legatee. His gifts to the school amount in all to over $800,000. 

On June 5 and 6, 1878, Phillips Academy celebrated its 
centennial anniversary with elaborate exercises, including an 
historical paper by Rev. William E. Park, an oration by Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, a poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes, and 
speeches by Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Gustavus V. Fox, 
and other distinguished men associated with the school. At 
this time a fund of $100,000 was raised, partly for the endowment 
of a principalship and a professorship in Latin. 

Dr. Bancroft's period was marked by both progress and ex- 
pansion. He was a man of clear vision and foresight, firm 
will, and shrewd discrimination, who had the good sense to be 
patient until circumstances were favorable for pressing his 
projects. His policy has been maintained by his successor, 
Alfred E. Stearns, during whose administration Phillips 
Academy has grown in material equipment, in numbers, and in 
efficiency. In 1908, when Andover Theological Seminary was 
moved to Cambridge, the Trustees acquired the entire Seminary 
plant on Andover Hill at a cost of $200,000, thus more than 
doubling its property in land and buildings. In 1901 two gener- 
ous benefactors of the school, Mr. R. Singleton Peabody of the 
class of 1857, and his wife, Margaret Peabody, established the 
Archaeological Department and provided for it a large endow- 
ment for instruction, publication, and research, and for the 
care and housing of collections in American Archaeology. 

The official installation of Principal Stearns into office hap- 
pily coincided with the celebration of the 125th anniversary of 
the founding of the school, held on June 16, 1903. The guest of 
honor was His Excellency, Sir Chentung Liang Cheng, Minister 
Plenipotentiary from the Chinese Empire to the United States, 

- 15 



who was a student at Phillips Academy in 1880 and 1881. At 
the exercises in the new Borden Gymnasium the speakers were 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie, Hon. Robert R. Bishop, Sir Chentung 
Liang Cheng, and Mr. Stearns. On the same day Brothers' 
Field was dedicated with an address from the principal donor, 
Mr. George B. Knapp. 

Concerning the significant developments of recent years, im- 
portant though they are, little need be said here. At his death 
in 1917, Colonel Oliver Hazard Payne, of the class of 1859, be- 
queathed to the academy the sum of $500,000, this being the 
largest single gift yet made to the Trustees. In 1919, at the 
instigation of an alumni committee, a nation-wide campaign for 
a Building and Endowment Fund of $1,500,000 was opened, and 
has resulted in the securing of about $1,600,000. The income of 
two-thirds of this amount will be devoted to the salaries of 
teachers and officers. 

In the World War, Phillips Academy played a distinguished 
part. Its Ambulance Unit, which sailed overseas in April 1917, 
was the first to be sent from any American school, and its bat- 
talion, formed in February, 1917, prepared many young men for 
the army. At least 2400 of its alumni were enrolled in the mili- 
tary or naval service of the United States or its Allies; and 
eighty-seven gave their lives in the cause of their country. A 
Memorial Bell Tower, erected on Andover Hill, commemorates 
their loyalty and sacrifice. 

LOCATION 

Andover is a town of nine thousand inhabitants, situated 
on the Portland Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
twenty-three miles north of Boston. 



16 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY is national in its representation and 
democratic in its life and spirit, and is "equally open to youth 
of requisite qualifications from every quarter". It aims to 
attract students of serious educational purposes and high moral 
standards. 

The Academy is not a suitable school for boys who are idle, 
insubordinate, or lacking in self-control; nor is it adapted for 
those who require the constant supervision of teachers in the 
preparation of school work. Students who are found to be un- 
able or unwilling to meet the requirements, and those whose 
influence is injurious, must be withdrawn from the school. As 
maturity is not always to be measured by years, the school has 
no specific regulation as to the age of the candidate. In general, 
however, it has been found that boys of fourteen are able to meet 
the responsibilities of life in the Academy. 

The school provides accommodations and surroundings for its 
students which enable them to pass by gradual and natural 
stages from the paternalism of home life to the freedom that 
awaits them in college. Williams Hall, with its close super- 
vision, special hours, and home life, offers attractive and helpful 
surroundings to the young boy just leaving home for his school 
career. A natural and progressive development is provided for 
subsequent years in the houses and halls which are in charge of 
married instructors. The regulations which obtain in all 
dormitories are here in force, but there is in them the atmos- 
phere of home. The later life of the dormitories is designed to 
develop a larger sense of responsibility and to prepare for the 
community life of college. Boys in the dormitories are under 
the supervision of instructors and are required to observe fully 
the regulations of the school. In the judgment of the school 
authorities the average boy will secure the best results intel- 
lectually and morally by following out this gradual change in 
residence. 



17 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



The requirements for admission to Phillips Academy consist 
in evidence of good character and of a satisfactory school record. 
The Academy being unable to receive all who apply for admis- 
sion, even when they can meet its minimum requirements, is 
obliged to discriminate among the applicants on the basis of 
their school records. It asks each candidate for admission to 
take certain specified examinations, in part to enable it to dis- 
criminate fairly among the applicants, but chiefly to enable it to 
properly classify those who are admitted. The school record 
already made by an applicant — interpreted to some extent 
by these examinations — determines largely the Academy's 
decision on each applicant. 

Students in the Academy arrange their work in accordance 
with the Course of Study as outlined on pages 48-50. This 
outline exhibits the work which is done each year by a student 
who is neither behind nor ahead of his class in any subject. 
It is not required that all the studies of the student shall be in 
the class in which he is rated; he is permitted to take individual 
subjects below or above that class, if his preparation in the pre- 
requisites of those subjects justifies such action. But a student 
ordinarily is not permitted to take courses in one class to the 
exclusion of uncompleted courses in a lower class except in sub- 
jects continuing through successive years. 

Applicants for admission to any of the three lower classes are 
asked to take entrance examinations set by the Academy on the 
work of such courses in its curriculum as they have completed. 
(In some subjects the examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board should be taken.) Each candidate should 
take the examinations for which his previous work fits him, 
irrespective of the class groups in which the subjects are listed 
below. 



is 



Junior ^° en * er as a norma ^ J un i° r (first-year class) a 

Ql ass candidate must have completed an approved 

grammar school course. He must pass satis- 
factorily examinations (1) in the following topics of Arithmetic: 
common and decimal fractions, denominate numbers, per- 
centage, interest, and square root, and (2) in such essentials of 
formal English grammar as are treated in Kittredge and Far- 
ley's Concise English Grammar (Ginn & Co.). The examina- 
tion in English grammar will be combined with a test in spelling 
and composition. It is strongly recommended that candidates 
for the Junior Class become familiar with the declensions and 
conjugations of either Latin or French or German before en- 
trance to the Academy. 

^ For those who wish to enter as normal Lower 

, 7 , Middlers the Academy sets papers on the work 

Middle , • t • , 

£j done m its Junior year as outlined on pages 

48-49. These examinations cover 

one year's work in Algebra, as described on page 58. 

one year's work in English, as described on page 56. 

one year's work in Latin, as described on page 52. 

one year's work in French (or German), as described on 

pages 53-54. 

TT Those who wish to enter as normal Upper 

U DDer 

Middle Middlers should take examinations on the work 

Q^ ass °f the Academy's first two years, as outlined 

on page 49. These examinations cover : 
*At least one year's work in Algebra (see note below). 

^Candidates for the Upper Middle Class in Courses B and C should have completed 
Elementary Algebra (Mathematics A, as defined by the College Entrance Examination 
Board) and should secure credit for this subject at the college for which they are preparing. 
Those who cannot secure this credit should take the Academy's examination covering its 
first year's work in Algebra, described on page 58. Candidates who pass that examina- 
tion study Algebra 2 in the Academy. 

Normal candidates for the Upper Middle Class in Course A are required to take the 
Academy's examination on its first year's work in Algebra, described on page 58. If the 
candidate can secure credit at college for Elementary Algebra Complete (Mathematics 
A, as defined by the College Entrance Examination Board), he should do so, and the 
Academy's examination in Algebra is waived. 



10 



two years' work in English, as described on page 56. 
two years' work in Latin, as described on pages 52-53. 
two years' work in French (or German) as described on 
pages 53-55. 

one year's work in German (or French) or Greek, as de- 
scribed on pages 54-53-52. 
As a substitute for any of its examinations the Academy will 
accept grades of 60% or higher obtained on a corresponding 
examination of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
It will also accept credits already established (by examination 
or certificate) at the college for which the candidate is preparing. 
Candidates who have completed a subject which they do not wish to 
continue should obtain credit at college for that subject instead 
of taking the Academy's examination. The Academy's examina- 
tions are designed to determine a candidate's ability to do 
further work in a subject and ordinarily do not give credit for 
a subject that is not to be continued. 

Senior Each Upper Middler in the Academy at the 

Classes enC * °^ Upper Middle year takes preliminary 

college examinations. Candidates for admission 
to the Senior Classes, therefore, should secure credit, at the 
college for which they are preparing, for the work of the 
Academy's three lower years or its equivalent. These credits 
are obtained by passing college entrance examinations, or, in the 
case of those colleges which admit on the certificate plan, by 
presenting to the college such certificates as it requires. 

The Academy occasionally admits to its Senior Class candi- 
dates for admission to college by the so-called "new plan". No 
candidate will be accepted on this basis unless he has completed 
an approved equivalent of the three lower years in the Academy, 
and has made an especially good record in scholarship. He must 
pass entrance examinations set by the Academy in those sub- 
jects already studied which he will continue. 

Students are not admitted to the Senior Class later than the 
beginning of the winter term. 

20 



Classification 



Candidates who are admitted to the Academy 
and secure credits in the ways indicated in the 



preceding paragraphs are rated as 

Juniors, if credited with fewer than 11 hours of the Acad- 
emy's courses; 
Lower Middlers, if credited with 11 to 28 hours; 
Upper Middlers, if credited with 29 to 45 hours; 
Seniors, if credited with 46 hours. 



fully, and completely and forwarded to the Principal of the 
Academy. Testimonial letters may either accompany it or be 
sent later. 

Certificates of standing in schools formerly attended are 
required. At the close of the school year, in June, the Academy 
sends to these institutions for complete official records of the 
candidates' work. 

Each candidate should take in June such examinations as the 
requirements outlined on pages 19-20 demand. Candidates 
should not count on qualifying by means of September exam- 
inations without definite assurance from the school authorities 
of the possibility of their admission in this way. The pressure 
for admission in recent years makes such procedure difficult. 
Those who take college examinations or secure certificate 
credits at college should forward official returns to the Academy 
as soon as they are received. 

Present members of the school are allowed first choice in room 
reservations for the following year. Rooms are assigned 
to incoming students about August 1, and in the order in 
which their admission applications are filed. Space for indicating 
room preference is provided on the admission application 
form. 



Procedure 
in applying 



In making application for admission to the 
Academy the form in the back of this catalogue 
should be used. It should be filled out care- 



Entrance Phillips Academy entrance examinations for 

^ . ■■ . candidates for the Junior, Lower Middle, and 
Examinations rT ^ r -in 1 i <« i 

Dates and Upper Middle classes, and new plan candi- 

p/ dates for the Senior class will be held on Tuesday 

and Wednesday, June 17 and 18, 1924. The 
schedule of hours is announced in May. The examinations will 
be given in 

Andover: Phillips Academy, Graves Hall. 

Chicago: Northwestern University Building, corner Lake 

and Dearborn Streets. 
New York: Room 206, Journalism Building, Columbia 
University. 

Examinations will be held in other large cities, in June only, 
if the number of candidates in any locality is sufficient. 

The examinations of the College Entrance Examination 
Board are held in a large number of cities in the United States 
and abroad, during the week of June 16-21, 1924. Application 
to take these examinations should be made to the Secretary of 
the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th 
Street, New York City, in general before the middle of May. 

On Tuesday, September 16, 1921±, examinations will be held at 
9.30 a.m., in Andover only, according to a schedule of rooms 
and hours announced at that time. 

For examinations held in Andover on these regular dates no 
fees are charged. For examinations held outside of Andover a 
fee of $.5.00 is required. 

Specimen examination papers will be supplied upon request. 

„ . j No special students, except foreigners, are re- 

, ceived in the Junior or Lower Middle year, and 

students .1*1 1 • • i» • 1 

the Academy makes no provision lor special 

students who are not candidates for graduation, or for entrance 

to college, scientific school, or professional school. 

Special courses may be arranged in the Upper Middle and 



22 



Senior years, only at the written request of parents and by 
special Faculty vote. 

Diploma The diploma of the Academy is granted to 

Requirements students who have secured passing grades. 

(a) in all required subjects in the course selected. 

(b) in subjects which amount to at least 69 hours of the curri- 
culum. 

(c) in a sufficient number of the subjects recognized by the 
College Entrance Examination Board to complete 15 units. 

(d) in all subjects pursued in the Senior year. 

„ ... Written examinations are held in each study at 
Examinations , , , . . . . 

^ least once a term, but the term grading is based 

Promotions ° n resu ^ s °^ D0 * n written examinations and 
daily work. A student who is guilty of dis- 
honesty in an examination may be suspended or dismissed. At 
the close of each term, a report of the student's scholarship 
and attitude towards his work is sent to his parents or guardian. 
Mid-term reports are also sent for all students whose work is 
below the passing grade, 60%, and for those who obtain grades 
of 80% and above. 

Class Each student is assigned to the special care of 

n „ a member of the faculty who is known as his 

Class Officer. This officer arranges the sched- 
ule of studies for each member of the class under his charge, 
and recommends such subsequent changes as seem desirable. 

„. . . The entire school is divided into groups of 

Uivision 

nm approximately twenty students each. Each 

^ group is assigned to the special charge of an 

instructor whose duty it is to familiarize himself with the 
previous history and present standing of the several members, 
and to serve as their counselor. 



23 



APPOINT M[E NTS 



7.45 a.m. Morning chapel. 
8.07 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. (Recitation 
. at . 4.07 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. \and study hours. 

W 8.00 p.m. Evening study hours begin. 

10.30 a.m. and 5.15 p.m. Sunday chapel services. 
Wednesday and Saturday afternoons are half -holidays. 

j jj ours Students are expected to occupy themselves 
with their studies or other school work during 

all study hours. 

Every absence of the student from recitation, 

A b ^ph cp 9 

morning chapel, Sunday service, or from his 
room during study hours, must be accounted for. The accumu- 
lation of eight unexcused absences involves suspension from 
school. In all cases of illness, notice must be sent at once to the 
Medical Adviser, who investigates daily all cases reported. 

Special importance is attached to meeting all appointments 
immediately preceding and following vacation and recess periods. 
A failure to meet such appointments must be regarded as a very 
serious offence and may necessitate withdrawal from school. 

. ^ ^ All out-of-town excuses must be obtained from 
wf-of- own ^ e p r i nc ipal. On half -holidays and on special 
holidays such excuses are granted occasionally 
to those whose school standing is good. The student who goes 
out of town without permission forfeits his connection with the 
school. 

Students are required to be present at morning 
e igions chapel. The Sunday services in the Chapel 

and the religious work of the school is conducted 
in connection with the Academy Church, an undenominational 
organization. Distinguished clergymen are frequently invited 
to preach to the school. Voluntary communion services are held 
in the Chapel during the year. The Society of Inquiry (the Chris- 
tian Association of the school) holds a voluntary meeting on 



24 



Sunday evening, which is often addressed by an invited speaker. 
During the winter term this society maintains a number of 
voluntary Bible and Discussion Groups led by members of the 
faculty. 

Upon written request from their parents, students may be 
excused to attend the morning services of the Protestant Epis- 
copal, Baptist, or Roman Catholic churches. 

EXPENSES 

Parents can estimate approximately the expenses of their sons 
at the Academy, and they are particularly requested not to 
furnish money beyond what is necessary for modest expendi- 
tures. Pupils who are supplied with much spending money, 
or who are allowed to incur debts, often accomplish little in 
their studies, and are liable to form habits which require their 
withdrawal from the school. Parents are earnestly requested 
to refuse permission to their sons to contract debts. 

The schedules of the items named below indicate the range of 
school charges. 

Table 1 indicates the range of the Academy's regular charges. 
Table 2 shows an average charge. Table 3 indicates the charges 
to scholarship students. 

Table 1 Table 2 *Table 3 

Tuition $250.00 $250.00 $0 to 250.00 

Room, light, and heat 100.00 to 350.00 225.00 to 50.00 

Board 230.00 to 420.00 280.00 to 280.00 

Athletic fee 20.00 20.00 to 12.00 



$600.00 to 1040.00 $775.00 $0 to 592.00 

T nil ^ ne t^tion for the year is $250.00 divided as 

Imtwn Bills foUows . three . fifths> or $i 5 o.OO, payable Octo- 
ber 1; two-fifths, or $100.00, payable on March 1. Each student 
is required to deposit with the Treasurer on entering the school 
the sum of $20.00 to cover breakage and other obligations which 
may be incurred during the school year. The balance remaining 
after such charges have been deducted will be returned. 
*For explanation of the items in Table 3 see pages 36 and 26. 

25 



An additional charge of $10.00 is made to members of the 
Senior class to cover the expenses of Commencement. A rebate 
of $1.50 from this charge is made if the student fails to secure his 
diploma. Students in Chemistry and Physics are charged for the 
supplies which they use. All bills are mailed to parents or 
guardians, but may be paid in person by the students. Class- 
room privileges will be denied to students whose bills are not 
settled on or before the dates mentioned above. As instructors 
must be engaged and other provisions for education must be 
made by the school authorities for the entire year in advance, 
tuition charges will not be refunded when students are suspended, 
dismissed, or withdrawn during the school year. Checks should be 
drawn in favor of the Trustees of Phillips Academy. 

A charge of four dollars a day to each student 
Infirmary is made for infirmary service which includes 

Service room and board. Extra charges are made for 

nurses employed in addition to the regular 
nursing staff. Local physicians render their bills for services 
directly to parents or guardians. 

Athl ti Fee ^ charge of $20.00 is made for the main- 
tenance of athletics, but for scholarship boys 
this charge is $12.00 a year which may be paid wholly or 
in part by the performance of special work assigned by the 
Bureau of Self-Help. Three-fifths of the total amount of this 
charge is payable October 1st, and two-fifths on March 1st. 
Students are not asked to contribute further to the financial 
support of the various school teams. 

„ „ Payments for student rooms in the school 

Room Rents . . , „ „ , £ , , 

buildings are required as follows: three-ntths 

of the entire yearly rental on or before October 1 ; the remaining 

two-fifths on March 1. A deposit of $25.00, which will be 

credited to the first regular payment of room rent, is required 

when the contract for the room is filed and the assignment 



26 



made. When a room is assigned to a student, his parent or 
guardian agrees by contract to pay the entire rental of the room, 
up to the close of the current school year, whether the student con- 
tinues a member of the Academy or not. The right is reserved 
by the Trustees to transfer boys from room to room in the school 
buildings whenever changes seem desirable; such changes, 
however, do not relieve the original occupants from the obliga- 
tion of meeting the entire year's rent unless newcomers are 
secured to fill the vacancies. 

Each room is furnished with a rug, desk, chiffonier, two chairs, 
bed, mattress, pillow, sheets, pillow cases, and one pair of blan- 
kets. Towels are not included. 

No refund of deposits will be made until the close of books for 
the fiscal year, June 30. 

PRICES OF ROOMS FOR 1924-1925 

SINGLE ROOMS 
Andover, Nos. 3, 5; Clement, No. 6; Pease, No. 14; Woods, No. 8 
Churchill, No. 4: Hardy, Nos. 4, 5. 
Woods, No. 7. 

Churchill, No. C; Clement, Nos. 3, 5, 8; Tucker, Nos, 2. 4, 5; Tower, 

No. 3. 
Woods, No. 5. 
Tower, Nos. 4, 5. 

Churchill, No. 3; Clement, Nos. 4, 7; Hardy, Nos. 1, 2, 3; Taylor, 

Nos. 5, 12, 19, 26. 
Day, Nos. 15, 34; Johnson, Nos. 6, 13, 16, 23; Taylor, Nos. 1, 6, 8, 
13, 15, 20, 22, 27. 

Abbot, Nos. 13, 14; Adams, Nos. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20; Bishop, 
Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32; Clement, 
No. 1; Day, Nos. 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 28, 31, 32; 
Johnson, Nos. 7, 14, 15, 22; Park, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4; Phillips, Nos. 
3, 4, 7, 14, 15, 18; Taylor, Nos. 7, 14, 21, 28. 
Clement, No. 2; Johnson, Nos. 2, 9, 20, 27. 
Johnson, Nos. 1, 8, 21, 28. 

SINGLE SUITES 
$250.00 Clement, No. 13; Eaton, Nos. 3, 4. 

$300.00 Andover, No. 4; Bartlet, Nos. 4, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 23, 24, 27, 28. 
$325.00 Adams, Nos. 1, 7, 18, 24; Bishop, Nos. 7, 13, 36; Day, Nos. 13, 36. 



$100.00 
$125.00 
$135.00 
$150.00 

$160.00 
$175.00 
$200.00 

$225.00 

$250.00 



$275.00 
$300.00 



27 



DOUBLE ROOMS 



The price stated is the amount paid by each student — not the price of the 
room. 

$135.00 Abbot, Nos. 4, 5, 7, 16; Farrar, Nos. 4, 6; Pease, Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. 
$150.00 Churchill, No. 5; Tucker, No. 3. 
$175.00 Johnson, Nos. 4, 11, 18, 25. 
$200.00 Tucker, No. 1. 

DOUBLE SUITES 

The price stated is the amount paid by each student — not the price of the 
suite. 

$160.00 Abbot, Nos. 6, 15; Farrar, No. 5. 

$200.00 Andover, Nos. 1, 6, 9; Bishop, No. 28; Draper, Nos. 1, 3, 5, 6; Eaton, 

Nos. 1, 5, 6; Pemberton, Nos. 1, 3, 5, 6; Woods, No. 6. 
$225.00 Bancroft, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18. 
*250.00 Adams, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 23; Bartlet. Nos. 1, 2, 8, 9, 12, 13, 

18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 30; Bishop, Nos. 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 33, 
35; Day, Nos, 2, 4, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21, 23, 27, 29, 33, 35; Taylor, 
Nos. 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25. 

$275.00 Phillips, Nos. 2, 12. 

$300.00 Johnson, Nos. 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26; Phillips, Nos. 1, 8, 11, 13, 

19, 22. 

$350.00 Bartlet, Nos. 7, 20. 



j^ QOm About twenty "room scholarships" amount- 

. . ing to approximately $50.00 each are available 

for deserving boys. These scholarships will be 
credited to the regular room charges on the recipients' term 
bills and will be awarded by the Principal to boys whose cir- 
cumstances compel them to keep their expenses at a low average. 

D'nin Hall ^ e e( l u ip men t of the Academy includes a 
well-appointed Dining Hall which accommo- 
dates two hundred and fifty boys. A fixed charge of $4.50 a 
week, payable one term in advance, has been made during the 
year 1923-1924 to cover light, heat, service, and food such as 
soups, vegetables, cereals, bread, butter, milk, coffee, tea, etc. 
Meats, fish, eggs, and desserts are served a la carte at cost and 
are charged against meal-tickets which are sold at $5.00 each. 
The average cost has been about $8.00 a week. 

28 



Private About eleven private houses in the vicinity of 

Houses Academy, under license from the Trustees, 

provide board and lodgings for students, and no 
student may occupy any house not thus licensed by the school. 
Some of the houses provide furnished rooms only; others provide 
rooms and board, and some furnish board for students rooming 
in neighboring houses. The price of table board is $10.00 and 
$12.00 a week. Students rooming in private families may, if 
they desire, board at the Dining Hall. The price of furnished 
rooms, including ordinary service, is from $5.00 to $7.50 a week. 

Engagements for table board may, on suitable notice, be 
terminated at the close of any term. Arrangements and pay- 
ments for room and board in private houses must be made with 
those in charge of the houses. 



SUMMARY OF PAYMENTS 

Tuition: 1st payment, Oct. 1; $150.00 2nd payment, March 1; $100.00 

Athletic Fee: 1st " " 1; 12.00 2nd " " 1; 8.00 

Room: 1st " "1; 2nd " "1; 

three-fifths of total charge two-fifths of total charge 

Deposit: Payable October 1; amount, $20.00. 
Graduation Fee: Payable March 1; amount, $10.00. 
Table Board: Payable one term in advance. 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Williams Hall through tne g eneros itv of Prof. Edward H. 
A Dormiior Williams, Jr., of the class of 1868, the school 
v J! in 1910 secured possession of a valuable piece of 
J property for the housing and care of younger 

boys. The property, comprising several acres, adjoins the Old 
Campus and is within a short distance of the other school 
buildings. 

29 



Williams Hall has attractive accommodations for forty-two 
boys. The rooms are spacious, light, and airy, and are heated 
with hot water and lighted with electricity. On the main floor 
is a common reading and recreation room. Table board is 
furnished in the building to all occupants of the house. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to provide in this building sur- 
roundings as helpful as possible for the best development of 
young boys, and to this end they have placed it in charge of a 
married instructor. Boys whose work is below standard may 
be required to report at seven-thirty each evening, when they 
work under supervision and are free to consult the resident 
instructor and his assistants in regard to their studies. 

Williams Hall supplies a stepping-stone between the natural 
restrictions of the home and the somewhat freer life of a large 
school. Although the boys who live here have all the advan- 
tages that Phillips Academy offers, they are under somewhat 
closer supervision than is customary throughout the rest of the 
school. For the school year 1924-1925 the charge for room and 
board in Williams Hall, not including the regular tuition charge, 
will be $750.00. A limited number of room scholarships are 
awarded annually in this hall. A special circular explaining 
in detail the equipment and arrangements of Williams Hall, 
and containing both interior and exterior views of this building, 
will be furnished on request. 

^ 7 , TT The school provides for dormitory purposes 
h acuity Houses „ , „ , . , 

fourteen nouses formerly occupied as private 

dwellings. These houses are suitable for younger boys, espe- 
cially those who are members of the two lower classes. Each 
house is in charge of a resident instructor. The rooms are fur- 
nished, and the charges include heat, light, and care of the 
rooms. 

The Abbot House provides accommodations for eighteen boys, 
the America House for twelve, the Berry House for six, the 
Blanchard House for eight, the Cheever House for twelve, the 

30 



Churchill House for six, the Clement House for thirteen, the 
Farrar House for six, the Hardy House for five, the Park House 
for six, the Pease House for nine, the Tower House for four, 
the Tucker House for seven, and the Woods House for five. 

Dormitories Through the generous gifts of Mr. Melville C. 

Day of the class of 1858, Mr. Warren F. Draper 
of the class of 1843, and a number of citizens of Andover, and by 
the purchase of the property formerly belonging to the Andover 
Theological Seminary, the Academy now possesses thoroughly 
modern dormitories providing at reasonable rates attractive 
accommodations for almost the entire student body. Below is 
given a brief description of these various buildings, and a list 
of the prices of rooms in each will be found on pages 27-28. With 
the exception of some of the Faculty Houses and Williams Hall 
these buildings are of brick. All are furnished, heated by steam, 
lighted by electricity, and equipped with shower-baths and the 
modern sanitary conveniences. Most of the study rooms have 
open fireplaces. Each building or entry is in charge of a resident 
instructor. 

Phillips Hall, erected in 1808, was entirely remodeled in 
1912. It is divided by a fire wall into two separate entries and 
provides accommodations for seventeen boys in each entry. 

Bartlet Hall was erected in 1820 and entirely rebuilt in 
1915. This building also is divided by a fire wall into two separ- 
ate entries, and contains both double and single suites, accommo- 
dating twenty-one boys in each entry. 

Pemberton Cottage, erected in 1891, contains five double 
suites. 

Andover Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double 
suites, one single suite, and two single rooms. 

Draper Cottage, erected in 1892, contains five double suites. 

Eaton Cottage, erected in 1892, contains four double suites 
and two single suites. 

31 



Bancroft Hall, erected in 1900, contains sixteen double 
suites. The building is divided by fire walls into three separate 
entries, each entry accommodating ten boys. 

Day Hall, erected in 1911, contains twelve double suites, two 
single suites, and twenty single rooms. The building is divided 
by a fire wall into two separate entries, each entry accommo- 
dating twenty-three boys. 

Bishop Hall, erected in 1911, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Day Hall and accommodates the same 
number of boys. 

Adams Hall, erected in 1912, is divided into two separate 
entries, each of which, like the Faculty Houses, is in charge of 
a married instructor. Each entry accommodates twenty boys. 

Taylor Hall, erected in 1913, accommodates twenty boys 
in each of its two entries and is in charge of two married in- 
structors. 

Johnson Hall, erected in 1922, is similar in its arrangement 
and appointments to Taylor Hall and accommodates the 
same number of boys. 

(For prices of rooms see pages 27-28.) 

This latest and largest addition to the school 

n ., ,. plant was completed during the current school 

Recitation , ., ... 

„ . 7 7 . year. 1 he building, containing twenty-six reci- 

Buildmq , ,. ° . .. . 

tation rooms and two examination rooms and 

thoroughly modern in every respect, was made possible through 

the activity and interest of the alumni of the school who 

generously provided the funds required for its erection. 

Graves Hall Graves Hall, devoted to Science, contains in 
addition to the large and well-equipped labora- 
tories for Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, three recitation 
rooms, a lecture room, and a drafting room. 



S2 



Pearson Hall ^ >earson Hall, erected in 1817 and remodeled in 
1878, and again in 1922, is used for recitation 
purposes. It contains four large recitation rooms and three 
conference rooms. 

j , , This building contains rooms for the collection 

Buildin °^ ^ e Department of Archaeology and a lecture 

room. 

P abod House ^^kody House bears the name of the founders 
of the Archaeological department, with the 
funds of which it was erected. The building carries out the 
expressed wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody that their bene- 
faction should promote the social interests of the student body 
as well as further the study of American Archaeology. Quar- 
ters are provided for the Phillips Union and include a well 
appointed grill, a large and attractive reading room, and a 
memorial room used as an assembly hall for receptions, lectures, 
and meetings of the various organizations of the school. 

. , . . . A . Brechin Hall is used for administrative and 
Administration ... r „, , n 

Offices and library purposes. Ihe lower floor contains 
T the offices of the Principal, the Treasurer, 
and the Registrar. A large hall on the upper 
floor is devoted to the library of about sixteen thousand vol- 
umes, which is in charge of a trained librarian and is open 
daily for the use of students. 

The Cha el ^ e ^apel, erec ted in 1875 and enlarged in 
1920, provides accommodations for the religious 
exercises of the school. The daily morning chapel exercises 
and the Sunday preaching and vesper services are held in this 
building. The Chapel contains the William Couch Egleston 
memorial organ. 

Borden ^ e ^ ca ^ em ^ nas a l ar £ e gymnasium, com- 

~ . pletely equipped with modern apparatus, and 

(jrUTTinaSlllTTl ./J.** ^ ^ ix 

y in charge of a Physical Director who is also 

the Medical Adviser. Students of all classes are required to take 
regular gymnasium work. 

33 



Sivimminq Pool The swimmin ^ P° o1 ' adjoining the gymnasium, 
is seventy-five feet long and thirty feet wide, 
and represents the most modern ideas in swimming pool con- 
struction. The elaborate filtration plant in the basement of the 
building assures the purity of the water used in the pool. 

The swimming pool was constructed in 1910 with funds se- 
cured entirely by the efforts of the students themselves. 

The Case ^ e Case Memorial Building, erected in 1923, 

M . , by Mr. and Mrs. George B. Case and family in 

±Vle7TlOTlCll e r> n n t • i 

jy memory 01 George B. Case, Jr., provides un- 

usual facilities for all kinds of athletic activities 
and healthful recreation during the winter term and on stormy 
days when such activities are not possible on the regular playing 
fields. 

Philli s Inn ^ e scno °^ property includes a well-equipped 
hotel, situated near the centre of the grounds, 
under lease to a manager, and furnishing to parents and friends 
of the school quiet and comfortable accommodations. 

The I sham ^ ca °- emv maintains an infirmary, the gen- 

T j. erous gift of Miss Flora E. Isham, whose name 

it bears. The infirmary was completed in 1912, 
is thoroughly modern in all its appointments, and was carefully 
planned under the direction of experts in hospital construction. 
In addition to the general wards, it contains single rooms for 
those requiring special treatment, and an operating room. The 
contagious wards are completely separated from the ordinary 
wards, and at each end of the building there is a large sun parlor 
entirely encased in glass. Boys who are sufficiently indisposed 
to be unable to attend classes are sent to the infirmary for proper 
care. Except when special arrangements have been made 
in advance by parents or guardians, the following regulations 
will be observed in the conduct of the infirmary. Patients at 
the infirmary requiring medical attention shall call in local 
physicians approved by the school authorities. In cases re- 

34 



quiring the attendance of specialists, the best men available 
in Boston will be called in consultation. In special emergencies, 
when operations seem necessary and parents cannot be con- 
sulted in advance, the Principal of the school assumes respon- 
sibility for authorizing such operations. The Medical Adviser 
may at any time examine and report upon individual cases. 

Athletic Brothers' Field, comprising twenty-three acres, 

Grounds 1S m °^ 0Se P rox * m fty to tne gymnasium and 

contains ample facilities for baseball, football, 
and track athletics. The Academy possesses other extensive 
grounds for various athletic sports, including baseball, football, 
soccer, and tennis. 

Bulletin ^ 6 bulletin, a ma S azme devoted to the in- 

terests and history of the school and its alumni, 
is published four times a year and sent to all former members of 
Phillips Academy whose addresses are known. 



3: 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



o 7 j i> The sums granted as scholarships vary accord- 
ing to the excellence of the boys in their studies, 
a student of the highest rank receiving a sum 
equivalent to the full tuition fee and room rent. Every new 
applicant for a scholarship must pay on entering the Acad- 
emy the sum of $50 toward his tuition. This sum is not re- 
mitted. At the close of each term scholarships are adjusted in 
accordance with the student's record in his studies during that 
term. Boys of limited means who possess scholarly ability 
and ambition are encouraged to apply for admission, and, if 
admitted, may be reasonably sure of financial assistance. 

~ . , Furnished rooms are set apart in various 

p . . . dormitories for boys who are obliged to keep 

Q h / h n their expenses within the lowest possible 
limits. A rental of $40 to $50 is charged each 
occupant of these rooms. Choice of room is determined by the 
scholarship rank of the applicant. 

Self Hel Ample opportunities are afforded by the Acad- 

emy to scholarship boys to earn a portion of 
their school charges. Service in the Dining Hall and boarding 
houses enables them to earn their board. Several agencies are 
assigned by the Bureau of Self Help and a number of students 
may earn a portion of the school charges by work in connec- 
tion with the school offices, and in caring for recitation rooms. 
An energetic boy may find various other chances for remunera- 
tive work. 

The William Phillips Fund of $4,633.33 estab- 
lished in 1795 by a gift of Hon. William Phillips 
and increased in 1827 by his bequest. 

The Students' Educational Fund, begun with a gift of $100 
from the Senior Class of 1854, now amounts to $5,700. 

36 



Scholarship 
Funds 



The Farrar Fund, a legacy from a former Treasurer, Samuel 
Farrar, established in 1865, amounts, with additions from in- 
come, to $22,000. 

The Clarke Scholarship Fund of $1,200 was established in 1870 
in memory of Mrs. John Aiken Clarke. 

The Samuel H. Taylor Memorial Fund of $3,700 was estab- 
lished in 1871. 

The Peter Smith Byers Scholarship of $500 was established in 
1878 by the late John Byers. 

The Class of 1878 Scholarship Fund, established by the Classi- 
cal Class of 1878, amounts to $967.37. 

The Jonathan Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1878 by the late Edward Taylor in memory of his father. 

The French Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 1879 by 
the bequest of Hiram W. French. 

The Caroline Parker Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1880 by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy. 

The Alden Memorial Fund of $5,000, a legacy from Dr. 
Ebenezer Alden, was established in 1881. 

The Gerard Sumner Wiggin Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1881 by the bequest of Lady Elizabeth Sumner 
Buckley-Mathew Fleming. 

The Stone Educational Fund of $25,000 was established in 
1882 by Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Valeria G. Stone Guarantee Fund of $1,400 was established 
in 1882 from premium received on stocks sold from the gift 
of Mrs. Valeria G. Stone. 

The Warren F. Draper Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Warren F. Draper. 



37 



The Richards Scholarship of $1,450 was established in 1889 
by the late Mrs. Mary A. Richards in memory of her sons. 

The Charles L. Flint Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the bequest of Hon. Charles L. Flint. 

The Henry P. Haven Scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1890 by the estate of Henry P. Haven. 

The Emma Lane Smyth Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1890 by the late Ex-Governor Frederick Smyth of New 
Hampshire. 

The James and Per sis Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1890 by the late Mrs. Mary E. Fairbanks. 

The Dowe Scholarship Fund, established in 1892 by the be- 
quest of Joseph Dowe, amounts to $3,097.98. 

The John Cornell Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was established 
in 1894 by the bequest of John Cornell for pupils from the town 
of Andover. 

The James Calvin Taylor Scholarship of $1,000 was founded 
in 1895 by his sister, the late Mrs. Mary W. Fairbanks. 

The Mary W. Holbrook Fund of $500 was founded in 1900 
by legacy of Mary W. Holbrook. 

The Edward Taylor Fund, a legacy from Edward Taylor, 
established in 1900, amounts to $1,000. 

The Ruby A. Carter Scholarship of $1,500 was founded in 1905 
by the late Mrs. Ruby A. Carter, in memory of her husband 
and daughter. 

The Herman Verhoeff Hartwell Scholarship of $2,000 was 
founded in 1907 by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Hartwell in memory 
of their son. 

38 



The Timothy A. Holt Scholarship Fund of $26,000 was estab- 
lished in 1908 by the bequest of Timothy A. Holt for the benefit 
of pupils from the town of Andover. 

The George Ripley Fund of $2,500 was established in 1908 
by a bequest of George Ripley of Andover. 

The James Huntington Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1910 by the widow and daughter of James Huntington, 
P. A. 1848. 

The Charles C. Clough Memorial Fund of $2,440 was estab- 
lished in 1923 by the Princeton classmates and friends of the 
late Charles C. Clough, P.S. 1906. 

The Allan Morse Penfield Scholarship of $1,000 was established 
in 1913 by the legacy of Allan Morse Penfield, P. A. 1904. 

The George B. Knapp Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 
lished in 1914 by a legacy of Miss Katherine Knapp. 

The Morris L. Glazer Scholarship Fund of $100 was established 
in 1918 by a gift of Morris L. Glazer, Class of 1917. 

The Harriet L. Erving Scholarship of $1,500 was established in 
1922 by the bequest of Harriet L. Erving. Income is to be used 
toward the tuition of her grandnephews during their course of 
study in the Academy. When not in use by them, said income 
is to be given toward the tuition of a needy student to be chosen 
by the Principal. 

The Samuel M. Evans Scholarship of $2,000 was established in 
1922 by Samuel M. Evans, Class of 1887. One-half of the in- 
come is credited to the Alumni Fund each year and the other 
half is used for a scholarship. 

The Frank Butler Walker Scholarship of $1,425 was established 
in 1923 by a legacy from the estate of Mrs. Mary C. B. Walker. 
The income is used for a scholarship. 

39 



The James Greenleaf Fuller Memorial Scholarship of $200 is 
sustained by Samuel Lester Fuller, P. A. 1894, in memory of his 
brother, and is available during his Senior year for a student 
of limited means, who in the judgment of the Principal embodies 
the best ideals of school life in scholarship, character, and 
influence. 

The Class of 1871 Andover-H award Scholarship of $300, sus- 
tained by Henry S. Van Duzer, P